Stay Young: Drinking Coffee Adds Years To Your Life

Who knew that your morning cup of joe could actually be doing more than just keeping you awake? Two recently published studies published by the Annals of Internal Medicine show that drinking coffee will decrease your mortality rate, allowing you to actually have more time for more cups of coffee. So all those 2 a.m cups while studying for the MCATs or the 10 p.m cup just when you get back from class have actually been more beneficial than you thought.

One study had results that showed lower mortality:

During a mean follow-up of 16.4 years, 41 693 deaths occurred. Compared with nonconsumers, participants in the highest quartile of coffee consumption had statistically significantly lower all-cause mortality (men: HR, 0.88 [95% CI, 0.82 to 0.95]; P for trend < 0.001; women: HR, 0.93 [CI, 0.87 to 0.98]; P for trend = 0.009). Inverse associations were also observed for digestive disease mortality for men (HR, 0.41 [CI, 0.32 to 0.54]; P for trend < 0.001) and women (HR, 0.60 [CI, 0.46 to 0.78]; P for trend < 0.001). Among women, there was a statistically significant inverse association of coffee drinking with circulatory disease mortality (HR, 0.78 [CI, 0.68 to 0.90]; P for trend < 0.001) and cerebrovascular disease mortality (HR, 0.70 [CI, 0.55 to 0.90]; P for trend = 0.002) and a positive association with ovarian cancer mortality (HR, 1.31 [CI, 1.07 to 1.61]; P for trend = 0.015). In the EPIC Biomarkers subcohort, higher coffee consumption was associated with lower serum alkaline phosphatase; alanine aminotransferase; aspartate aminotransferase; γ-glutamyltransferase; and, in women, C-reactive protein, lipoprotein(a), and glycated hemoglobin levels.

Based on the study: Coffee drinking was associated with reduced risk for death from various causes. This relationship did not vary by country.

Meaning that when your deciding between an Italian brew or a good German blend, both will be helping you to live longer.

Another study looked at results amongst non-White Americans: Higher consumption of coffee was associated with lower risk for death in African Americans, Japanese Americans, Latinos, and whites.

58 397 participants died during 3 195 484 person-years of follow-up (average follow-up, 16.2 years). Compared with drinking no coffee, coffee consumption was associated with lower total mortality after adjustment for smoking and other potential confounders (1 cup per day: hazard ratio [HR], 0.88 [95% CI, 0.85 to 0.91]; 2 to 3 cups per day: HR, 0.82 [CI, 0.79 to 0.86]; ≥4 cups per day: HR, 0.82 [CI, 0.78 to 0.87]; P for trend < 0.001). Trends were similar between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee. Significant inverse associations were observed in 4 ethnic groups; the association in Native Hawaiians did not reach statistical significance. Inverse associations were also seen in never-smokers, younger participants (<55 years), and those who had not previously reported a chronic disease. Among examined end points, inverse associations were observed for deaths due to heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney disease.

Each person’s body is different, and has different factors to account for when looking at the study, but the overall consensus is that in these new studies coffee has been seen to decrease mortality rate.  So keep on sipping those morning cups; they’ll help you out in the long run.

Video Source: CBS News

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Jed Belaguas

Jed Belaguas is a content marketer, amateur web developer and copywriter, well versed in writing blogs, press releases, and editorial articles.