Make the Right Choice: Best Paying Healthcare Careers in 2017

Choosing to go into healthcare has always been an admirable career decision, but you need money to make it through every day. The industry pays well and might be the motivation behind some individuals choosing to take this route. If you are going to study to become a professional, you might as well do it in the direction of the highest paying jobs. Here is a list of the healthcare careers that could help you earn good money. Surgeons A surgeon has an earning potential of around $187 000, which is not a small amount of money at all. It does take some time to become a surgeon, but I would say that it is completely worth it. Perhaps it’s time to work on that residency personal statement. Dentists I have seen a lot of jokes going around stating that dentists are people who failed at becoming doctors. Well, if their salaries is anything to go by, I’d reconsider that joke. Dentists can earn around $155 000, which is enough to live a comfortable lifestyle. Pharmacists Prescribing medicines to patients is a very important part of the healthcare industry and without pharmacists, the industry would not function at all. With earnings around $120 000 and many jobs available for pharmacists, this would be a wise career choice. Podiatrists Podiatrists are usually required to do their residencies earlier than some physicians. Research some...

Cultural Competency in Healthcare: What Is It and Why Do We Need It?

I was walking along a crowded street when a skinny, darkly colored man entered the flow of traffic in front of me. Looking back to see where he came from, I noticed a seemingly insignificant door at the base of a tall, weathered building. The scene wouldn’t have caught me off guard – a man simply exiting his workplace or home, perhaps – except for the blue and white NHS sign that was displayed on the brick exterior. I was in London, visiting a Bangladeshi community to learn about the social environment of this marginalized population. The man I had seen enter the street was most likely of Bangladeshi nationality given the brown color of his skin and his dark eyes. I was more interested in the building where he came from, though. The NHS label stood for National Health Service, the governing body that provides healthcare for the United Kingdom’s residents. My tour guide later explained that the building housed a free clinic for the homeless and low-income people in the area. Government-funded dollars provided access to healthcare, and I thought that was incredible. This ordinary scene on a rainy day in London, surrounded by people that look and speak very differently than me, started a cascade of thoughts on culture, health, and medical practice. I wanted to learn more about how culture influences healthcare. So, I did...

Summer Work Experience For Medics – How To Ramp Up Your All-Important Applications

When you’re considering your future career as an MD, what’s the biggest factor that will likely contribute to you landing a place at that college, or even scoring your dream residency? Could it be how long you kept your head in a book? Well, clocking up the hours in the library certainly helps! Will it be your bedside manner? Fortunately, this is something you can hone during your ward rounds, as you gain more and more exposure with the patients in your care. What about what extracurricular activities you committed yourself to during the summer break? That could certainly be a factor – bear with me, here! The short answer is relevant, educational and vocational experience: both fantastic grades as well as being able to show dedication to the field you’re interested in. The power couple of good grades (or, moreso, a good degree) and strong extracurricular experience can get you very far – as you’ll know from both your college and med school applications. For both pre-meds, and those anticipating their college days with a keen interest in medicine, the perfect time to build up your relevant experience is during the long summer break. Yes, of course this is a time to wind down, but why not build up a bank of solid, relevant work experience hours? We’ve pulled together our top tips for gaining relevant work experience...

Ketamine: The New “Miracle” for Depression?

Although it is known among the general population mostly as a popular party drug, ketamine was originally invented in a commercial laboratory in 1962.  In 1970, it was approved by the FDA for use as an anesthetic among soldiers in the Vietnam War. Non-medical use of ketamine began in the U.S. at roughly the same time, but it wasn’t until 1999 that ketamine became a federally controlled substance in the U.S. Despite its bad rap as a dangerous post-party drug, ketamine is listed as a “core” medicine in the WHO’s Essential Drugs List, as it is produced very cheaply around the world and is fast and effective as an anesthetic for minor procedures. Image: Source However, ketamine is having a new heyday as patients and clinicians are looking to the drug to help treat severe depression. Although it is still considered an “off-label” use of the medication, researchers from the University of New South Wales, in Sydney, Australia, have just completed clinical trials using ketamine to treat depression. Although the initial trial consisted of just 16 senior citizens, the researchers are extremely optimistic about the emerging results, published in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. Lead Professor Colleen Woo reported to ABC News in Australia that “all the symptoms of depression across the board disappeared. So [the patients] felt better, they were able to enjoy things, they were interested in...

You Come First: The Hippocratic Oath Matters To Students, Too

The Hippocratic Oath, an oath historically taken by physicians to uphold certain ethical standards, states, “I will apply, for the benefit of the sick, all measures which are required“. A pretty straightforward statement, something that pre-med and medical students typically understand – we have to do everything in our power to help our patients. We spend countless hours in libraries, labs, and hospitals trying to better ourselves so one day we can help others. The stress is very apparent, medicine is obnoxiously competitive and it takes a toll on everyone involved, students included, whether we like to admit it or not. We’re always so engrossed in our studies and endeavors that we forget one simple, but significant detail: we’re human too! Throughout history, healthcare (especially mental health) of healthcare professionals has been stigmatized. It is often viewed that since we take care of others, it is a sign of weakness on our part when we have those same problems, those that we encounter and treat on a daily basis. A lot of the times, the stress faced by students and practitioners of medicine leads to a hypocrisy, in the sense that we cope with our stress in the very ways that we advise our patients not to. Whether it is excessive, poor eating habits, lack of exercise, smoking or drinking, etc, all of it is detrimental to our physical...

7 MCAT Study Tips For The Busy College Student

There is no getting around it, the MCAT may make you or break you. Yes, you are more than a number. Yes, your extracurricular activities count. But, in order to show the admissions board what you “bring to the table,” you must meet that schools minimum score requirement for the MCAT. The MCAT is scary, it is, but the test can be conquered with the right prep and planning. I’m here to help calm your nerves, offer you a pillar of hope during your time of studying, and give you some tips on how to make your study time more efficient. The most important thing you can do is have a schedule and try not to deviate from it. There are numerous websites and companies who have sample study plans to choose from that can make your planning easier or you can devise on your own. Most of the templates follow a general trend and look something like this: 6:30-8:00 am – Wake up, eat breakfast, exercise, shower 8:00-12:00 pm – Study for the MCAT (Prep with questions, read material etc.) 12:00-2:00 pm – Break 2:00-5:00 pm – MCAT prep 5:00-7:00 pm – Break 7:00-9:00 pm – MCAT prep 9:00-10:30 pm – Unwind, go to bed. This schedule makes the MCAT look not too scary am I right? Well, usually if you’re scheduled to take the MCAT, you’re in...

PODCAST: How Do We Treat Psychiatric Disorders?

From the days of Freud, psychotherapy had been a dominant form of treating psychiatric disorders. But more recently, psychotherapy use has declined in favor of medications. In fact, according to a 2010 study in the American Journal of Psychiatry, the number of patients in outpatient mental health facilities receiving only psychotherapy fell from 15.9 percent to 10.5 percent from 1998 to 2007, while the number of patients receiving only medication rose from 44.1 percent to 57.4 percent. Now, there are a number of reasons behind this shift. On the one hand, many in the science community look down to psychotherapy as an unstandardized mode of treatment. Meanwhile, to these critics, medications have proven to be safe and efficacious after numerous clinical trials. These criticisms seem sound, but is a decline in psychotherapy use for the better? Does the use of medication alone ignore the social and cultural components unique to psychiatric disorders? In the first episode of The Void Podcast, I talk to psychiatrist Dr. Loren Sobel to answer these questions. Dr. Sobel practices psychodynamic therapy—a form of psychotherapy that seeks to uncover the psychological roots of patient’s mental illness. In addition to discussing the effects of the shift from psychotherapy to medication, Dr. Sobel and I speak at-length about the causes—including the scientific community’s greater dependence a biological model of disease. Have a...