Are Textbooks Too Expensive? Survey Says Yes

The second-biggest financial stressor for college students, right after paying for tuition, is buying the source materials they need for their classes, according to a Morning Consult survey which was done at the request of Cengage. Cengage is a company that offers course materials like study guides, homework sheets, and textbooks to millions of students throughout the country. The survey was comprised of information from 1,651 former and current college students, ages 18 to 30. In the survey, 85 percent of students said paying for course materials, including the textbooks for their classes, is stressful financially. Only 73 percent of students said that paying for student housing was stressful. That figure was even lower for healthcare at 69 percent and meals and food at 63 percent. While all the categories mentioned can be expensive, a large number of students, at 87 percent, felt textbooks and course materials were overpriced and not worth the money. A similar number of students, at 86 percent, believed their college tuition was overpriced. The students reported they had to make sacrifices to help pay for their course materials. Four in 10 students said they missed meals to save extra money to chip at the cost of the materials. Two in 10 students said they even changed the major they pursued just to cut down on the cost of what they needed. Meanwhile, three in 10 students said...

The FAQs About Third Year Clerkships

There was some point in your life, either as a young elementary school kid or a senior in college, when you finally decided that you were going to become a doctor. You dedicated every waking moment of your life to that task, preparing yourself in the best way possible to become one of the best. After four years of college and two years of medical school, you finally arrive on the wards, ready to care for patients. So now what? Being 4 months out from my first day as a third year medical student, I can finally reflect back and answer some of the most common questions and concerns I had about doing well on third year clerkships. 1. What’s the best way to prepare for shelf exams? In one word – Uworld. To elaborate on this a little more, if your shelf consists of NBME questions, Uworld is a great resource to start with as you are going through the 4-8 weeks of each rotation. There are also NBME practice exams that can be found online to prepare you more. However, as per my experience, I found Uworld to be more than sufficient for doing well on shelf exams. 2. What resources can I use to study while on the wards? UpToDate, Case Files, Online MedEd. The most common questions you are going to be asked as a...

Science Behind Different Types of Video Game Medicine

Video games have some of the most advanced medicinal practices and some greatly staffed programs. In this article, we dive into the science behind some of the more popular games out there right now to see what video game medicine the government is secretly hiding from us. Battlefield 1 Medic! Battlefield 1 is a game developed by EA Dice, and is a World War I first person shooter game.  The player battles through the major events of World War I and competes online against other players. But what is interesting is the healing process of players in the game.  To “revive” or heal an opponent, one simply whips out a needle filled with a grey fluid and pokes the player anywhere on their body. That grey juice must have been a scientific advancement during World War 1 that the government didn’t want us to find out about; boosting white and red blood cell counts and drastically speeding up white blood cell work and platelets (for those who don’t know, platelets are small cells that clump together to prevent and aid in stopping bleeding). Those wounds, burns, and scrapes heal up quicker than wolverine, and your back in the fight! Call of Duty World War II As with Battlefield 1, Call of Duty World War II makes it seem that World War II had a much more advanced medical system...

5 Resources to Boost Your AIDS Awareness

Our world is changing and it is important that we stay aware of what is happening. AIDS is not a new topic, but a lot has happened in the past few years regarding awareness thereof. It is said that people believe only a certain demographic can get infected. This is absolutely not true and anyone is at risk. There are some steps you can take to protect yourself, but a lot of people living with AIDS got infected without having a choice. Understanding what it means living with AIDS and how to prevent it is where one needs to start. I tried to find the best website to raise AIDS awareness, but there are actually a lot of good ones. These resources help build awareness and keep us updated with new developments. Luckily, we live in an advanced world where technology and science are changing our lives for the better. People living with AIDS no longer have no hope. There are medications out there to assist them in living a full and happy life. If you would like to educate yourself more on the subject, these resources are of a great help. AIDSHealth.org This is a great place to start when you are trying to learn some facts about AIDS. It is a website created by the University of California and has a lot of information. What is great...

Lab Mice Might Become A Thing Of The Past

Scientists at École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) have developed a small laboratory-in-a-box capable of housing and feeding a colony of C. elegans nematodes (roundworms) and testing the effects of cosmetics, drugs, and other substances to determine their toxicity to living organisms in an automated, easy-to-manage process. EPFL helped create Nagi Bioscience, the company commercializing the technology, which has already placed functioning prototypes in notable labs around Europe. Click here to learn more about this laboratory innovation from EPFL News. Syndicated from The Doctor’s Channel. More on Mice on AlmostDocs.com: Helping Mice Mate: 3D Printing Ovarian Envelopes: Northwestern University researchers have tested various 3d printing techniques to discover the angles at which ovarian follicles will optimally interact with their scaffolds to increase ovary survival. 30º and 60º angles apparently provide better protection and vascularization than 90º angles. The results have been harnessed to create a prosthetic implant that is meant to help restore fertility. Sterile mice implanted with these new follicle-infused scaffolds were able to reproduce through natural mating processes. Nobel Prize Winning Scientist Recreates “Inception” in Mice: Susumu Tonegawa, the 1987 Nobel Prize winner in Physiology or Medicine, and his team of neuroscientists at MIT have published compelling evidence suggesting that it is possible to access the memory axis and induce false memories in a mouse model. Tonegawa’s findings pose interesting and thought provoking questions to not only the scientific community but also the political, legal and social communities. One is forced to...

Why Presentation Skills Will Help You As A Doctor

I recently worked on a group presentation with some of my classmates on treatment planning. We were given the patient’s chart and asked to come up with the best treatment for their condition and present the case to faculty member who would ask each presenter a different question on our treatment. When we did a presentation run through, everyone read directly off the slides. For students with no exposure to public speaking and presentation skills, it is no surprise that they would do this. We sit through hours of lectures where professors read off slides that sometimes aren’t their own. In college, as a pre-medical student, you may get away with awkward pauses and statements filled with hesitation (you know, those um’s and like’s in the middle of a sentence). In a professional school program, such as medical school, it is inexcusable not to have basic presentation skills. I came up with a few suggestions for students interested in practicing speaking in public: 1. Look for opportunities to become a leader in your school in clubs 2. Raise your hand in class and ask questions 3. Take electives in your respective program or academic opportunities to write or speak in public 4. Learn by observing Ted Talks or YouTube videos 5. Participate in Toast Masters sessions 6. Look for Improv groups or clubs Why is this important? As doctors,...

Are Older Doctors Worse Than Younger Ones?

If you’re a patient, would you trust older doctors, or younger ones? Perhaps you’d pick an older one because you think they’re more seasoned and knowledgeable. Or, maybe you’d choose a younger one because you think they’re more up to date with modern treatments. Deciding between doctors can be tricky, but a recent BMJ study has elucidated a key difference in performance between younger and older doctors. The study—led by Dr. Anupam Jena of Harvard Medical School—took a random sample of Medicare data for more than 700,000 hospital admissions from 2011 to 2014, and found that doctors age 50 and above have higher patient mortality rates than doctors under age 50. The results are summarized in the table below: Doctor age range Patient mortality rate 40 and under 10.8% 40-49 11.1% 50-59 11.3% 60 and above 12.1% The differences are small, but they’re meaningful. The study controlled for a number of factors, including the possibility that the sickest patients were assigned to older physicians on any given day. Jena suggests that older doctors have worse outcomes because they’re less up to date with the newest medical technologies. “There’s a fear that as doctors get further away from residency, they might be out of touch with new technologies and treatments,” Jena told STAT news. Studies support Jena’s claim—a study in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that over half of...