Never Say These Eight Things To Nurses

Nurses may be seen as saints, but they can still get pushed over the edge when one too many ridiculous statements come their way. Here are eight comments that can trigger a nurse’s involuntary face-slapping reflex: 8. “Nursing is easy. Some nurses work three days a week!” Anyone who says this has never worked three 12-hour night shifts and picked up an extra shift in between. 7. “Which doctor do you assist?” Nurses work for and with others; they are not simply handmaidens to physicians. 6. “Why didn’t you become a doctor?” As if becoming a nurse is somehow “settling for less” or aiming too low. 5. “This isn’t like on TV.” You’re right; if this was TV, you’d be dashing, 6’2”, not in a hospital gown, and taking me in your arms right now. 4. “Are you going to give that stethoscope back to the doctor?” Not even going there. 3. “Do you only date doctors?” Nurses are usually only attracted to Dr. Scholls. 2. “What happened to nurse so-and-so?” Believe it or not, nurses do go home eventually. 1. “Hey nurse.” While we do take pride in our profession, we also have names; I am not a servant, a waitress, or an otherwise objectified minion. Originally syndicated from Nurse.org with...

Five Ways To Keep Your Brain Alert In Medical School

Reading a Fast Company article this morning,  I was inspired to consider the ways I can keep my brain alert for the long haul. As a student, I do study most of the time so one could argue that my brain is constantly alert. It’s true that I do have to make a conscientious effort to relax my brain.  But, the suggestions in the article were very helpful. I’ve slightly modified the five daily habits that were recommended to the general public to be more school friendly. With a schedule as busy as ours, the following five suggestions may not be feasible to do on a daily basis. I think weekly is more manageable. Change your diet. I recently made changes to my own diet by drinking more water. If you’re anything like me, spending money and investing in a more expensive product such as the trendy Swell bottle could motivate you to drink more water. Or, adding fruit like berries, or lemon slices, or herbs like mint, help to change the flavor of plain water. Take inventory of what you could benefit from the most. For example, if you order Domino’s 3X a week, perhaps making home cooked meals would be an appropriate swap to incorporate more greens and vegetables to your diet. I have also found that switching the grocery store you shop for food adds some...

Top Five Graduate Degree Careers and Jobs

If you are wondering what you should ‘get a masters in’ by going back to school, you may want to consider one of the 5 fastest growing careers that require a graduate degree. All five choices represent occupations with the most projected growth between 2016-26 as reported by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), where the typical entry-level education is a master’s degree.i Earning a master’s degree is a big commitment. First, you likely want to make sure it’s worth the investment – of time, money and energy. In addition to considering your interest, it could be important to look towards your future career. Why not match your strengths with some solid data about job growth and salary potential? You could explore topics you love while preparing to pursue a potentially dynamic career path in the future. What Are the 5 Fastest Growing Careers That Require a Graduate Degree? The fastest growing careers that require a graduate degree are: (1) Physician Assistant – PA, (2) Nurse Practitioner – NP, (3) Statistician, (4) Mathematician, (5) Genetic Counselor. ii Just what does it mean to be in this category? Fastest Growing Careers That Require a Graduate Degree Courtesy of gradschools.com   Employment Outlook for the Fastest Growing Careers With a Graduate Degree (2016-2026) The number one factor in determining the top 5 fastest growing careers requiring a graduate degree is the employment outlook from 2016-2026. This is a...

The Latest Breakthrough in CTE Research for Your Football Players

Dr. Bennet Omalu, the inspirational character behind the movie Concussion starring Will Smith, and the lead author of the study claiming to have correctly diagnosed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in a living patient over 4 years before his death, identified the now deceased patient who was the subject of this announcement as Fred McNeill, former linebacker for the Minnesota Vikings. Although this is only one case, and researchers admit more evidence is needed before making further conclusions, this marks the first time a diagnosis of CTE was indicated during a patient’s life and then confirmed by an autopsy after the patient’s death. This is a great breakthrough in CTE research in alleviating and preventing CTE for football players, but we will need more data to adequately diagnose it. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, is a progressive degenerative brain disease associated with repetitive head trauma. Currently, CTE can only be confirmed post-mortem. In a new study from JAMA earlier this year, researchers examined the brains of 202 deceased former football players — more than half of them from the NFL — and talked to their family members to identify pathological and clinical features of CTE. CTE has affected football players of all ages, including a player student athlete that committed suicide because he had known about the condition: While it is unknown whether Madison had the same disease, the link between these two well-liked, successful, and smart young...

What Happens If You Overuse Antibiotics?

I went to med school in a place where Lyme disease was endemic. So when I was on my Medicine rotation and one of my co-students complained about feeling tired and achy for a few days, our attending immediately said to him, “Get tested for Lyme disease.” The student was reluctant. He didn’t have a rash. Our student health plan was crappy with a huge deductible, so he would have had to pay for the test out of pocket. Also, I pointed out (from a personal Lyme scare) that he could get a false negative this early on. “Well, if you don’t want to get the test,” the attending said, “I’ll write you a prescription for doxycycline and you can just treat it.” And then we saw another attending, who totally agreed with this. Even years later, I still find this offensive. The course of treatment for Lyme is 10-21 days of antibiotics. Would you really give someone up to THREE WEEKS of antibiotics because they were tired and achy a few days? I took doxycycline and it made me throw up… not something I’d personally be excited to take for weeks for no reason. And… hello, antibiotic resistance? I’d like to believe that the attendings were just over-treating because it was a colleague and not something they recommend to all their patients. Originally syndicated from Dr. Fizzy’s Blog...

The Pros and Cons of Having Dyslexia

Dyslexia can be described as a general term for disorders that hinder one’s ability to read and interpret words, pictures, and other visuals. While this condition can’t be cured, there are  treatment options available for those diagnosed with dyslexia and can be identified easily at an early age. Did you know that 10% of the population in the UK suffer from the disorder? Over 700 million people worldwide suffer from the disorder. Dyslexia brings along many unexpected boons, such as high creativity and superior thought processing, and can easily be overcome with the right specialist, attention, tutoring, therapy, and other treatment options. Famous figures such as Steven Spielberg and Albert Einstein suffered from the disease, so it is definitely possible to become a successful person even with the disorder. Researchers are working day-to-day looking for ways at a better quality of life for dyslexics. For example, the BBC reports that a new typeface – Dyslexie – helps dyslexics read, by tweaking some of the characters. There are even applications such as Snaptype and Mental Note developed for individuals with visual impairments. How does dyslexia affect the human person? How can dyslexic individuals challenge themselves to overcome its impairments? Here is an infographic by Wooden Toy Shop detailing its challenges and gifts, and how to learn and succeed despite its setbacks. The Challenges and Gifts of Dyslexia by Wooden Toy...

A Day in the Life of a MD-PhD Student

Physician-scientists are medical doctors who contribute significant effort toward scientific research and play an integral role in the advancement of medical knowledge. They provide a unique perspective to the research community through first-hand experience with patients and the problems they face, but they also have the research skills to directly address those problems. Examples include Edward Jenner, a physician who created the smallpox vaccine, and Frederick Banting, who isolated and discovered the therapeutic potential of insulin. Modern physician-scientists continue to carry on the tradition of excellency established by these earlier physician-scientists, though they are becoming a smaller part of the biomedical workforce. Being a MD/PhD student looking to become a physician-scientist is a time-consuming process that requires both medical and research training. Research training can be done at various times such as during fellowship, in a research year during medical school, or by completing a PhD. The latter is frequently offered in a dual-degree program in which research and medical training are integrated over approximately 8 years. This is an ideal route for those people interested in effectively translating basic science findings into the clinic. Over the past 4 years, I’ve often been asked by undergraduates interested in a career as a physician-scientist to describe my daily life as a dual-degree MD/PhD student. Yet, I have not because my days are so variable that I’ve found it difficult to...

Page 21 of 201‹ First...10...202122...30...Last ›