Is alcohol now a better pain reliever than Acetaminophen‬‬?

Well here’s something to drink to: a new study from the University of Greenwich’s Journal of Pain suggests that alcohol might be a better pain reliever than Acetaminophen‬‬ and other common pain relievers. The study suggests that alcohol contained analgesic, or pain relieving effects. According to their researchers, a blood-alcohol content (BAC) of .08%, or three to four standard drinks, provides a small increase in pain threshold. The research also suggests that “higher blood alcohol content is associated with greater analgesia”, and “a moderate decrease in pain ratings was also observed”. From the Journal of Pain study, titled Analgesic Effects of Alcohol: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Controlled Experimental Studies in Healthy Participants: Despite the long-standing belief in the analgesic properties of alcohol, experimental studies have produced mixed results. This meta-analysis aimed to clarify whether alcohol produces a decrease in experimentally-induced pain and to determine the magnitude of any such effect. PubMed, PsycINFO, and Embase databases were searched from inception until April 21, 2016 for controlled studies examining the effect of quantified dosages of alcohol on pain response to noxious stimulation. Some evidence of publication bias emerged, but statistical correction methods suggested minimal impact on effect size. Taken together, findings suggest that alcohol is an effective analgesic that delivers clinically-relevant reductions in ratings of pain intensity, which could explain alcohol misuse in those with persistent pain despite its potential consequences for...

Why is this med student marrying her diploma?

Higher education is a demanding commitment, and graduating medical school is quite an achievement. While many medical student graduates go unto their medical track, business as usual, Angie Hamouie did something unique upon receiving of her diploma. Angie has a public website, showcasing the inspiration and details of her “Graduwedding”. She describes her idea in the home page: Imagine a graduation party that’s as EXTRA as a wedding. That’s a Graduwedding. It’s unlike any graduation party ever. A graduation is a person walking across a stage and accepting a really expensive piece of paper. But a ~Graduwedding~ is so much more– It’s the union of two souls, in this case Angie and her Medical Degree (MD).   The idea for the Graduwedding occurred after Angie discovered the results of her match into residency (read that story on the Enmatchment page!) She was so elated, she wanted to celebrate with literally anyone and everyone she’d ever met, and even people she hadn’t. This was such a big deal for her, because it was the culmination of 3 degrees and 9 years of higher education. Her match represented everything she had worked toward. Angie realized this graduation would only happen once in her life. She wondered, why is it that no one really celebrates their graduation? And if she threw a party, how could she convey that this party was a Big Deal?  ...

QUIZ: Medical Practices of the Past

How well do you know history’s important medical practices? Test your knowledge of how medical practices have evolved over time! Medical practices we use now have been reached by a wealth of knowledge gained over many years, tests and experiments and the study of data. Medicine in the 21st Century is based on scientific knowledge. So, when you realize what practices were used as little as 50 or 60 years ago, it seems amazing that we’ve come so far ever since! It also makes you thank God you weren’t alive in those times, for the treatment may have been worse than the illness. Try our quiz and see if you can guess which practices are fact and which are fiction. Source:...

Social Rejection And Alcoholism

Source: Pixibay We all know that there’s a distinct connection between leading a miserable life and alcoholism. Sometimes, cause, consequence, and correlation become inextricably tangled within the vicious cycle of heavy drinking and personal misfortune. A recent study, however, has shone a light into the connection between alcoholism and social rejection. It’s an important finding, which has implications across the board – on a healthcare level, it could help us to both prevent and treat alcoholism in vulnerable people. On a societal level, it demonstrates the kind of changes we need to make in order to keep the (fast-growing) spectre of alcoholism at bay. The study, published by the Research Society on Alcoholism, saw participants use their smartphones to record social interaction and personal alcohol usage for fourteen consecutive days. Researchers then analyzed the style of interactions recorded, and the alcohol usage on the days when they occurred. They found that there was an association between rejective social experiences and the amount of alcohol drunk, with those who had had interactions classified as ‘rejective’ tending to drink more than those who had not. Researchers were keen to stress that the closeness of the relationship in question appeared to be a significant factor. Those who had experienced rejection from those they considered ‘close’ were significantly more likely to drink heavily on the days when said interactions occurred than those who had experienced...

Medicine’s Gender Pay Gap is Huge

  A new survey conducted by Doximity, a social media site for physicians, shows that female physicians make an average of 26.5% (or $91,000) less than male doctors. The self-reported data—which was gathered from 36,000 licensed physicians and controlled for factors such as hours worked—shows that the pay gap exists in all medical specialties and in every U.S. city.   The largest wage gap is in neurosurgery, where female neurosurgeons are paid, on average, $93,000 less than males. One of the smallest pay gaps is in preventive medicine, where females still make $35,000 less on average. Meanwhile, in terms of geography, the largest wage gap exists in Mississippi, where female physicians make, on average, $118,000 less than males. The smallest gap is in Hawaii, where women make $45,000 less.   Medicine’s gender pay gap is especially concerning considering many medical specialties rely greatly on female physicians. For instance, specialties such as Pediatrics and Obstetrics & Gynecology are predominantly female, but male physicians in these specialties still make an average of 21% more than their female counterparts. These specialties, among others, will likely see more females in coming years as close to half of the graduates from U.S. medical schools are women. In fact, female graduates outnumbered males in states such as Pennsylvania, Illinois, and Washington. Furthermore, research suggests that female doctors perform better than males—a recent Harvard study showed...

5 “First Class” Medical Schools

The expansion of medical schools in the United States is in full effect, addressing the projected shortages of physicians in the United States. These are the 5 new medical schools welcoming their inaugural classes this month. These students are the first ever to learn at their school. No pressure. 1. UC Riverside School of Medicine University of Californnia Riverside School of Medicine is the first medical school to be established in California in several decades. Its first class, consisting of 50 students, started on August 5. The allopathic school is the sixth in the University of California system. Administrators say they plan to emphasize the need for physicians in the inland southern California region, which is largely underserved. The building cost $25 million and the launch required approximately $100 million from the community.   2. Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine  Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine is located in Buies Creek, North Carolina, focusing on underserved and rural areas. The inaugural class consists of 162 students, and at full enrollment the school expects to have about 600 students. Campbell is North Carolina’s first new medical school in 35 years. After graduation, students could begin residencies at Southeastern Regional Medical Center in Lumberton, Cape Fear Valley Medical Center in Fayetteville and WakeMed in Raleigh. The facility costed $35 million. 3. Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine  Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine welcomed...

5 Things You Need to Know About First Year

As August begins, all those anxious MS1s are entering into the world of “almost” docs. But what happens after the white coat ceremony? Here are the top 5 things I learned from my first year of med school. 1. Life revolves around school. From the very first day of anatomy lab until the final musculoskeletal exam, my life revolved around the next upcoming exam on the curriculum calendar. There was a certain amount of studying that needed to be done every day, and taking unnecessary days off created multiple dreaded 10+ hour study days. Unquestionably, medical school pushed me to manage my time more efficiently than anything in college. And while life did revolve around school, I tried my best to not make my life become just staring at power points. Just like my classmates and I become more efficient at studying, we squeezed as much fun as we could out of those windows of freedom, no matter how small they were.   2. Medical education is adapting to the digital age. Of all the scheduled class time during the year, I attended less than 25% of in-class lectures. WesternU COMP does a great job of being flexible with different learning styles, and the option to watch recorded lectures fit perfectly into my learning style. Instead of sitting through a 4-hour lecture, I could playback the lecture at 2x speed...

Page 20 of 173‹ First...10...192021...30...Last ›