8 Films Every Health Professional Student Should Watch

I don’t know about you, but some films can really leave a mark. Over my journey, I have watched many medically related films but these 8 continue to surface to the top of my memory. Next time you need a pick-me-up, choose one of the following:   Hacksaw Ridge is a 2016 biographical war drama film directed by Mel Gibson. The film focuses on the World War II experiences of Desmond Doss, a combat medic who refused to carry or use a weapon or firearm of any kind. Doss was the first conscientious objector to be awarded the Medal of Honor.   Something the Lord Made is a 2004 biographical drama film directed by Joseph Sargent. This film is about Vivien Thomas, a cardiac pioneer, and his complex partnership with Alfred Blalock, a pioneer of modern cardiac surgery.   Patch Adams is a 1998 comedy-drama film directed by Tom Shadyac. This film is based on the life story of Dr. Hunter “Patch” Adams who built and ran the free community hospital, Gesundheit Institute, in West Virginia.   Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is a 2017 film directed by George C. Wolfe. The film is based on the best-selling book by Rebecca Skloot and documents the story of Henrietta Lacks whose cancer cells (HeLa cells) changed the course of cancer treatment forever.   The Heart of Nuba is a 2016...

32 Amazing Tips to Learn and Study Faster

Have you ever felt that there aren’t enough hours in the day? Or that you’re always struggling to get everything done in time? Medical Students—and anyone trying to learn something new—will probably understand what I’m talking about. Even if you’re fully invested in the process and have strong motivation, there’s just one thing keeping you from succeeding more: the lack of time. While it’s impossible to add extra hours to a day, there is still a way out. Want to know what it is? Learn and study faster. We’ve put together an infographic that will show you how to make the most of the time you have at your disposal. With 32 different ways of fast learning to choose from, at least some of them will surely be perfectly fitting for you. It won’t hurt to look through our infographic. And the couple of minutes you spend on it will pay off when you start using some of the techniques described below! Part of having a healthy study habit and maximizing your learning capacity is a healthy diet. Make sure to know about these eight superfoods for better studying! Everything steps up a notch on test days. You have to work harder and be ready to change things if they don’t work. As you progress you gain a better sense when to cut corners. Free more time for important things,...

The 8 Types of Medical School Professors

Going to medical school soon? Here’s a comic from Dr. Fizzy that will tell you just what type of medical school professors you will encounter, one way or another. They are all unavoidable and annoying, but at least they will help you get your medical degree, right? These are the types of medical school professors you will run across in medical school. The Enthusiast: will do your dissection for you but anatomy is not fun! Maybe he should drop the act… The Drone: he’ll allow you to catch up on sleep during class, but you’ll start to miss Powerpoint, even if he reads off it. The Party Animal: you will finally learn the effects of beer on kidney sections, but he will encourage you to drink beer under the table. Talk about peer pressure and second-hand drinking! The Comedian: she’s occasionally funny, but may cry if a pity laugh isn’t given. Might be insecure. The Sexist: great if you’re a female, but you may not be a female. Great if you’re a man, but may not be if you’re a woman. The Dummy: he’s easy at writing exams, but his board exam will be written by someone with actual medical knowledge. The Omniscient: kind of cool how he knows so much; however, the glass will shatter once you see the final exam. The Unmemorable: not memorably horrible and will make up most of...

Pursuing Medical School via a Non-Traditional Route

Do you wish to change your career and become a doctor? Pursuing a medical career after staying out of school for a significant number of years or after working/studying in a different field can be quite arduous. Luckily, you can effectively pursue medical school via a nontraditional route as many people do (myself included). As a non-traditional applicant, you can leverage the skills you earned from your previous career to better inform your pursuit of medicine as a career. Regardless of the reason why you wish to change your career, you need to be thoroughly prepared to impress admissions committees and prove your dedication to your ultimate goal. More importantly, you need to be ready to embrace your status as a non-traditional pre-med student. If you are set on applying to medical school as a non-traditional pre-med student, below are some invaluable tips to guarantee your success. 1. Be fully decided and committed. It’s all or nothing. Being a nontraditional student, you are required to show an unparalleled level of maturity and responsibility. You need to ensure that you are making the right decision. Having specialized in another field, you have certain advantages over your younger peers. You have more diverse life experiences from which to draw, which means you have more compelling reasons as to why you have chosen to change things up and pursue a medical career...

How To Remind Yourself Why You’re In Medical School Studying

In the middle of a semester where the days are filled with endless studying, lab work, real work, homework, club responsibilities, and an attempt at a social life, it is very important to remember why you are doing it all. For me, I anticipated this semester to be one of the most challenging – full of three upper-level science classes and an English class, a TA for organic chemistry, two jobs, two leadership positions in clubs, in addition to a slurry of other unnamed obligations that I am thankful I get to do. I admit, though, that my mindset the entire semester has been to just get through it, while maintaining my GPA, friendships and social life, and my mental health. In the midst of studying late nights for physics exams or waking up early to review biochemistry notes, I became unaware of the wave that is carrying me through the semester. I think this is a popular defense mechanism; it is essentially focusing on surviving instead of thriving. However, as I am carried along the wave characterized by work, school, and sleep, I easily lose sight of why any of it matters. I live in the mindset of “just get it done”. If you’re in this type of semester or phase of life, I urge you to find yourself something that will daily, weekly, or monthly remind you...

So What Really Is The Purpose Of A Medical Residency?

Going through rotation after rotation as a third year medical student, I often wonder if I’m really retaining anything. Some days prove to be so overwhelming that I often wonder whether I can truly perform as a physician in the field. The sheer volume of knowledge that we are expected to muster in a quick and efficient way is quite jarring. So, I thought maybe residency will help me out with this. As I started talking to residents on each rotation, they all gave me different takes on the value and utility of a medical residency. One description in particular has stuck with me, breaking down our progression as clinicians from the first day of residency all the way to our (hopefully) long tenure as attending physicians.   1. Safe As first year residents, we know a lot, and there’s no doubt about it. However, the importance of establishing patient safety and understanding the concept of “do no harm” takes primary importance. It’s ok to not know what to do rather than doing something unsafe. Our actions are often life changing and you want to make sure that you start off your clinical practice on the right foot by determining the safest approach.   2. Good As you progress further along in residency right as you are entering the median years, the focus is on building on safety and...

12 Study Tips to Help You Pass the USMLE Step 2 CS Exam

The USMLE Step 2 Clinical Skills (CS) exam is a critical stepping stone in your medical career, since it affects your ability to get a license. While the exam is graded pass/fail and you can take it more than once, it’s frustrating to prepare for it again and again. With the right study and practice tips, you won’t need to! Tips to Clear Step 2 CS Exam Here are some of the most effective tips to help you clear the Step 2 CS exam: Primary Resource – Even though you will find plenty of resources both online and offline, “First Aid for USMLE Step 2 CS” covers detailed cases for all the main diseases in America. It’s really the only book you need. Mini Cases – To improve your differential diagnoses, read mini cases and reread them a couple days before your USMLE exam. This will help you ask the right questions if your patient doesn’t have what you initially thought they did. Timed Practice – Simulate the conditions of the actual Step 2 CS exam by using a timer while practicing. During the real exam, this keeps you from getting too nervous and forgetting about time because you’re stressed. Live “Patient” – Working with one or more partners or standardized patients is the most important of practice tips to clear Step 2 CS exams. This lets you interact...

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