Studying Made More Enjoyable: The Art of Brewing Coffee

If you don’t like coffee, you should definitely start trying to. Pulling an all-nighter studying in the library will be much more enjoyable if you don’t want to spit out what’s keeping you alert. If you’re one of those people who prefers energy drinks for a late night studying, you’re doing it all wrong. They’re more expensive, loaded with sugar, and don’t warm your soul like a cup of coffee does. There are ways to acquire a taste for coffee – and it’s not by loading it up with cream and sugar. You must learn the art of brewing the perfect cup to enjoy all that coffee has to offer. And, if you already are a coffee addict, believe it or not, there may be a few tips you’ve missed out on… Buy it and keep it fresh– You never pick out the rotten strawberries at the grocery store so why do it with your coffee beans? Instead of digging through your pantry trying to find the coffee you bought months ago when you made your first attempt to become a coffee connoisseur, go buy fresh beans! To keep them fresh, the beans should be stored in a cool, dark area. If you don’t plan on using them within two weeks, keeping them in the refrigerator will ensure that they stay as fresh as when you bought them. Use...

Reasons My Intern is Crying

For anyone who has seen (and loves) the blog “Reasons my Son is Crying,” you’ll appreciate this. Here I discuss the reasons my residents are crying and expose the toll that stress can take on an individual [re: mourning the loss of a pen]. You can find this cartoon and more...

Picmonic: the Secret to USMLE Success?

Human memory is a fickle thing. How is it that we can remember a line from our favorite movies years later (“ARE YOU NOT ENTERTAINED?”) yet forget somebody’s name before they are even finished talking? For medical students, memory is an especially frustrating topic. The ultimate memory tests are the USMLE and COMLEX Step 1 board exams, 8-hour long marathon tests taken at the end of the second-year of medical school that cover all the material presented during the first two-years. At 649 pages long, First Aid for the USMLE Step 1 is considered to be a “condensed” version of the high-yield material tested on the exam. Adding to the stress of the exam, Step 1 scores are considered to be one of the most important factors in selecting candidates for residency interviews. Capitalizing upon, and perhaps worsening, this frustration has been a vast array of board preparation services offered: online courses, review books, and question banks to name a few. And while a 2003 study found no improvement in USMLE scores for those who took a commercial course versus self-study, there are no shortage of options available to students for board prep. One of the newest and fastest growing board prep companies is Picmonic, an Arizona-based start-up founded by two third-year medical students, Adeel Yang and Ron Robertson. Spreading through medical campuses with an impressive word-of-mouth campaign, Picmonic...

Top 10 Future Medical Advancements that You’ll Probably Use to Save Lives

A 69-year-old today has the same likelihood of dying as a 15-year-old hunter-gatherer once had. We are living longer and longer lives, and in the next decade several new technologies and procedures could extend the lives of our patients even further. Learn about just a few of the innovations that may one day be your best shot at saving, or just preserving someone’s life. Featured image from Flickr | Brookhaven National...

Is IBM’s Watson The Future Of Medical Decision Making?

Ever since soundly winning Jeopardy! in 2011, IBM’s Watson has been quite busy. Besides soundly beating out members of Congress in an untelevised Jeopardy! match, Watson also became possibly the smartest second-year medical student of all time. But like any bright medical student, Watson didn’t just stop there. IBM recently announced the development of two paradigm-shifting projects, WatsonPath, a diagnosis and education program, and Watson EMR Assistant, a tool for analyzing information stored in medical records. Building upon Watson’s question-answering abilities, WatsonPath draws from clinical guidelines, evidence-based studies, and reference materials to either support or refute a set of hypotheses. WatsonPath is essentially the algorithm machine every medical student wishes they had in their head during board exams. And with a “learning regimen” that includes breaking down board-style questions, why wouldn’t WatsonPath score the highest USMLE score ever? How can WatsonPath be used as an educational tool? The video above explains how the project not only offers answer suggestions, but also displays a schematic flow diagram showing the reasoning behind answers and confidence levels. WatsonPath breaks down clinical scenarios the same way any medical student would, looking at signs and symptoms, interpreting lab values, and searching for key associations. The project is currently being assimilated into the Problem-Based Learning (PBL) curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. Beyond the classroom walls, the possibilities of Watson for actual...

The Coolest Smartphone Adjuncts to Enhance Patient Care (and Make Your Friends Insanely Jealous)

Your iPhone is your best friend. Not only does it keep track of important meetings and give you access to your many email accounts, but you can also detect that new Fitz and the Tantrums song and instantly tweet it to all your friends in the span of 30 seconds. What you may not have realized is that it can also be used to aid in the assessment of your patients and to help guide patient care. Here are 4 of the coolest attachments to transform your smartphone into a diagnostic device: 1.   Welch-Allyn PanOptic iExaminer   If your (lack of) skill level is anything like mine, your attempts at funduscopic exams are met with incomplete, transient views of optic discs and getting stoked when you can identify even a red reflex.  With the advent of the PanOptic ophthalmoscope, fancy preceptor offices will afford you the ability to see the entire retina in one field, but what the heck do you do with this information and how do you relay it? Thanks to the iExaminer attachment, you can hook that Welch-Allyn PanOptic up to an iPhone for just under $100 and share these images with your attending and even with your patients.  So that’s what a flare hemorrhage looks like!   2.   Cellscope Oto System     While at the community health fair, you realize that 2 year old...

Student Debt: About the Mortgage Weighing You Down

So, I feel bad that all of my posts seem to do nothing but poke holes in the bubble that protects medical students from the “real world.”  I started with the threats to GME, and then brought home the government shutdown…and now I’m about to do the same with student debt.  But talk about it or not, this hulking Goliath is going to catch up with many of you one way or another, so I figure best to be prepared. Let’s get the numbers out of the way first: 86%– the amount of graduates from 2012 who had debt $166,750– the average amount of debt for these graduates from medical school ONLY.  Let’s note that there is actually a bimodal peak here, with over 1/3 of these students having debt > $200,000 (meaning that the average is skewed down thanks to those scholarship recipients). $49,651– the average salary of a 2012 intern. This equates to under $13/hr as residents work 40-80 hours per week. 36%– the amount of these graduates who also have undergraduate debt   Briefly I want to talk to you about a cushion we used to have called “federal loan subsidies”.  There were loans called subsidized Stafford loans that did not begin accruing interest until 6 months after the student graduated medical school.  But then Section 502 of the Budget Control Act of 2011 eliminated this...

Page 189 of 206‹ First...10...188189190...200...Last ›