Are Zombie Doctors Taking Over America?

They might be. But here’s how your boy ZDogg is fighting...

10 Non-Academic Books For Med Students (That You Won’t Have Time To Read)

If you have ever time to read for fun again, you might want to throw these on your night table! Feel free to add YOUR favorites in the comments or tweet them us @almostdocs 1. The House of God, Samuel Shem, M.D. Think your internship is bad? Think again.   2. Cutting for Stone, Abraham Verghese Conjoined twins, separated, grow up surrounded by medical professionals, have many feels.    3. Still Alice, Lisa Genova Brilliant Harvard Professor gets early-onset Alzheimer’s. Plot twist: she’s telling the story in first person narration.   4. Harvest, Tess Gerritsen Bad doctors. Bad, bad, bad doctors. 5. Midwives, Chris Bohjalian So, is this midwife a murderer or…   6. One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest, Ken Kasey Psychiatry rotation, eh?  Ya already know how this one ends.   7.  Turn Of Mind, Alice LaPlante I know there’s already one unreliable doc-with-Alzheimer’s narrator on this list but this one’s a murder mystery!   8. Healer, Carol Cassella Medicine and a gripping love story? Lemme at it.   9. Going Bovine, Libba Bray Okay, it’s YA Fiction but the girl has Mad Cow Disease!   10. The Emperor of Maladies, Siddhartha Mukherjee Okay, this one is serious and practically a textbook but if you’re a med student and you haven’t read it yet, it’s the definitive “biography” of cancer so,  you know: make...

Making the Most of the iPad Mini on Medicine Rounds

On my birthday a few years ago, I was lucky to get an iPad Mini from my husband. I already had an iPad and had shared my experience. In fact, we gave all of our residents iPads (one of them contacted Steve Jobs and got a response), and documented an improvement in efficiency on the wards. So why the Mini? What is all the fuss? Why is the Mini the new must-have for doctors and future doctors? 1. It fits in your white coat! Yes, while there were entrepeneurs who started creating the iCoat, the truth is who wants to wear a coat with a huge pocket on the side? This means that you also don’t need to wear the “strap” that we require our residents to wear for the iPad since we did not yet invest in the iCoat. 2. You can hold it in one hand! This for me is the best part and very underappreciated point in the blogs and reviews I have read. This means you can touch the screen with one hand while you are palming it with the other. I don’t even have the largest hands so I would say it definitely was just at the reach of my palm grasp, but I can imagine it would be perfect for my male colleagues. 3. It fits in your purse! While the female docs may find palming the iPad mini...

Should You Ask a Question in the OR?

Hint: The answer is always...

6 Questions for a Med Student on International Rotations

Practicing medicine abroad has always been an interest of mine and when I was recently contacted by Work the World, a program which places medical students in rotations in countries across the globe, I was eager to hear more about the kind of work that can be done internationally. Alison Maclean, a research student at the Liverpool Medical School in the UK whose interest is Women’s Health, took the time to answer some questions I had about her experience doing a 5 week elective in Sri Lanka. I was amazed by the freedom and opportunities she had to really practice medicine and excited to hear about the possibilities for learning and getting truly involved with clinical care. If Alison’s story appeals to you, taking some time to continue your medical education in a different country might be worth looking into. Work the World is just one of many organizations who offer international rotation opportunities. Additionally, many schools have developed global medical experience programs and may offer financial aid to assist you with travel costs. Consider talking to an advisor or doing some research online to make sure you find the right fit for you! Galle Fort, Sri Lanka (all pictures courtesy of Work the World) 1.     What are your interests and passions, what school do you attend, what field are you specializing in, what is your favorite part of...

How Med School (Ironically) Taught Me That Studying Comes Second

You know you have a problem when you can’t fall asleep at night. That’s where I was nearing at the end of anatomy in my first year of medical school. I couldn’t sleep because I was terrified of what the next day held. My sympathetic nervous system was on full alert, ready to handle the next day. The only thing between the next day and me was a night of sleep that seemed harder and harder to get to. In the “Chronicles of Narnia” series, C.S. Lewis remarks that sleep is something that becomes more difficult the harder you try to accomplish it. This was the curse of my predicament. I was exhausted and in dire need of rest at the end of each day, but held captive by what “could” happen the next day. In a follow-up visit with my pediatrician over winter break, I had some testing done that revealed some unanticipated results. Though I had been diagnosed with ADHD in grade school, my pattern of inattention and easy distractibility was more consistent with an anxiety disorder than ADHD. With further questioning and history taking, it became obvious that I was a classic case of generalized anxiety disorder. It wasn’t something that was created from the rigors of medical school; it was something revealed for what it was by the rigors of medical school. I had been able to get...

5 Precise Techniques to Become the Most Effective Learner Ever

If you’re like me, you probably study by going through your notes or powerpoints, perhaps rewriting your notes, but basically making sure that you can regurgitate the information that you are given. You may take practice tests and do well, but then get to the actual test and not do as well as you hoped. You blame it on the questions being of a different caliber than those on the practice test and so you didn’t prepare for that style of questions. You tell yourself that you’ll just study with more brute force next time. You’ll go through the lectures more times, you’ll write out your notes again, and you’ll hopefully do better. But then that doesn’t always happen. What we know about the world is exponentially growing, and it is difficult impossible to keep up. Looking at the sheer volume that we must learn as students can be overwhelming and discouraging. It makes us question whether we are cut out for this path. We live a stressful life of lectures, study groups, and examinations. And yet, there is one area that we tend to overlook that is essential for our success – how to effectively study. The American Medical Student Association recently held a webinar on how to be an effective learner in medical school featuring Jay Phelan from UCLA who helped develop PrepU, a website that creates...

Page 176 of 208‹ First...10...175176177...180...Last ›