How To Take The Perfect Nap

Sleep is an amazing thing, and something that most medical students don’t get enough of. Yes, sometimes pulling an all-nighter to study is necessary, but no matter how many hours you study, catching an ample amount of those precious Zzzs will allow you to recall information, think quickly and clearly, and subsequently, pass your exam. When you really don’t have time to get a full night’s sleep, a nap can make you feel refreshed both physically and mentally. Here are some great tips to make sure you optimize your nap time. Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually. Infographic and featured image from http://visual.ly/...

5 Must-Know Eye Conditions for any Opthalmology Exam

While most of the ABIM Examination topics fall neatly into organ system categories, not all of them fit into this schematic. These include: ophthalmology, primary care screening guidelines, vaccinations, etc. Here at Knowmedge, we’ve incorporated this important group of subject areas into General Internal Medicine, similar to the American College of Physicians’ Internal Medicine In-Training Exam Blueprint. Today, in this first of a series of blogs, we review the key eye diseases: Conjunctivitis, Macular Degeneration, Glaucoma, Retinal Detachment, and Cataracts. The eyes may see only what the mind knows, but your mind should know these eye conditions for the ABIM exam. The exam is several months away so go ahead and bookmark this page so you can quickly review it once more in the days before you obtain your certification or recertification.   1. Conjunctivitis Conjunctivitis is broken down into viral, bacterial, and allergic conjunctivitis Viral • Usually caused by adenovirus • Having a preceding upper respiratory infection or recent exposure to a person with conjunctivitis are clues to aid in the diagnosis • Acute onset • Usually unilateral redness • Watery discharge is present • Highly contagious • Frequent hand washing must be performed to prevent spread of infection • Supportive treatment including cold compresses and artificial tears. NO role for antibiotic eye drops with viral conjunctivitis   Bacterial • Common causing agents are Staph aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae,...

5 Medical Breakthroughs That Will Change The World by 2020

Salim Ismail, the founding executive director of Singularity University, gives you the top 5 medical breakthroughs that will revolutionize the healthcare sector by 2020. Read more about Salim Ismail. Filmed at FutureMed, in February 2013, at Singularity...

These Docs Dreamed of Saving the World, and They’re Doing Just That

Doctors across the United States can read up on vital health information with a quick Google search, but how do medical professionals in global underserved communities access this same material? WiRED International, a volunteer-driven non-profit, has been solving this problem since 1997 by building Medical Information Centers (MICs) for healthcare professionals and Community Health Information Centers (CHI Centers) for local community members. For information-starved doctors and nurses in regions stricken by war and poverty, the CHI Centers represent a chance to learn from previously unattainable medical information. On the other hand, MICs offer grassroot community involvement of birth attendants, students, peer educators, and traditional healers and teach them the health issues such as HIV/AIDS prevention in Kenya.  In order to verify that each of WiRED’s training modules are accurate and effective, WiRED pulls from a board and volunteer-base with extensive clinical and public-health backgrounds. By giving medical professionals the chance to learn more about the health needs of their region, WiRED aims to empower local doctors and nurses to take better care of their communities. The list of program countries reaches across the globe and Community Health Information Libraries can be found in countries ranging from Albania to Iraq to Sierra Leone. In 2009, WiRED’s founder, Dr. Gary Selnow, received the UC Berkeley Public Health Hero Award in which he talked about the program: WiRED’s latest program is a Severe Malnutrition Module produced in response to the alarming increase in malnutrition in Syria. Future programs for 2014...

A Final Thought as American Heart Month Comes to an End

As American Heart Month comes to an end there are a few things doctors and “almost” docs should think about when treating patients at risk of heart disease. The number one consequence of misdiagnosis is jeopardizing patient safety. Of course doctors do everything in their power to protect and better patients’ health; however, when women with heart disease are misdiagnosed, the consequences that doctors face are extremely important to understand. This infographic provides great information about the consequences of misdiagnosis and and ways to prevent that from happening. Protect the patient and protect...

9 Things I Miss About AOL

1. Bad Screen Names For a large majority of twenty-somethings, there’s nothing more embarrassing than recalling your first screen name. Created during a period in your life when you possessed a truly stunning inability to tell the difference between lifelong interests and temporary infatuations with passing fads, most early screen names reflect interests that we’d prefer to forget. I know my Buddy List circa 1998 featured testaments for everything from KoRn to The Undertaker to the number 69. I even remember with particularly horrific glee one friend from my blindingly white suburban town who christened himself as a SnoopSoldier. Creating a screen name was an important step in our adolescent development. By choosing that name, you weren’t just publicly declaring your support for a given band or movie or sports team, you were actively incorporating them into your own identity. At least when it came to the online world, you actually became a SnoopSoldier; after all, random people in chat rooms had no idea you looked more like Frankie Muniz than a gangsta rapper. Just imagine how terrifying it would be if when you met all your new med school friends, you had to introduce yourself with your first ever screen name…   2. The Thrill of Realizing That Other People Share Your Bizarre Interests Before the internet, if you liked something really esoteric or random, like Japanese Death Metal or...

Medstart’s Blue Button Challenge: The Best New Ideas in Medical Technology

The 2nd annual MedStart was hosted by Tufts University School of Medicine on January 17-19, 2014. This year, The Blue Button Boston Innovation Challenge brought together diverse minds from relevant fields of study (medicine, business, technology, engineering) to collaborate over a weekend to create a startup company. The code-a-thon was an opportunity for providers, patients, and the developers of consumer facing technology to come together to learn about Blue Button, identify high priority use cases, and build exciting new products ready to receive Blue Button...

Page 171 of 204‹ First...10...170171172...180...Last ›