A Must-See Show on the Founding of Alcoholics Anonymous

Samuel Shem, author of The House of God, delves into his motivations and inspirations for writing the internationally acclaimed play, Bill W. and Dr. Bob. The play tells the story of the extraordinary beginnings of Alcoholics Anonymous and its co-founders, Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith, who developed the organization out of a surprising revelation. The revenues and donations from the play will go to a national tour of medical and college campuses to address the epidemic of binge drinking. We strongly recommend that medical students and other aspiring medical minds go see this show — and they can get in for a discounted price! Take your friends, take your significant other, take your classmates, take a professor you’re trying to suck up to… it truly is a show for all audiences! The discounted price for medical students is $20 for the following show dates: Thursday, 8/22 @ 7 pm. Friday, 8/23 @ 8 pm Saturday, 8/24 @ 8 pm Sunday, 8/25 @ 3 pm Sunday, 9/1 @ 3 pm The show is currently playing at The Soho Playhouse in New York City. For tickets go...

The Ten Fight Club-esque Rules of Medical Education

First rule: Don’t talk about medical school. Second rule: Don’t talk about medical school. Seriously, nobody cares about gaucher’s disease, osteogenesis imperfecta, or all the random things you know about diabetes. They especially don’t care about gossip between emotionally stunted medical students. Third Rule: Don’t complain about medical school. Despite all the caring and listening doctors purportedly do, nobody cares less about the strife of other doctors than doctors. That goes double for medical students. Fourth Real: Gunners get gunned. Realize that though you can get ahead of others by being a note whoring, brown nosing know-it-all, everyone can and will hate you for it. Fifth Rule: Grades are like a normal person’s income. Only to be shared with close friends and only pompous d-bags brag about it. Sixth Rule: The professor is not your tutor, and the lecture is not a conversation. You get two questions per lecture (three if you’re good). Anything more is wasting everyone’s time. If you seriously don’t get it be a big boy or girl and learn it yourself. Seventh rule: When the professor at the end of the lecture asks, “are there anymore questions?” that in no way means ask a question. That means “I’m done and if you have a question come talk to me after class where all of the people who actually care will be and those that don’t will not...

Why Does It Always Have to Be About Sex?

We live in a society where talk about sex runs rampant. And if someone isn’t overtly talking about it, they’re thinking about it (or at least now you are). As always, popular media has taken advantage of the hopes and dreams of young ones and given the people exactly what they’re looking for: sex. In medical TV shows such as Grey’s Anatomy, the on-call room is little more than a brothel. Attendings sleep with interns and interns sleep with med students and med students sleep with nurses and the world goes ’round and ’round as these health care providers seem to live consequence-free with their promiscuous actions. While most aspiring medical minds are probably intelligent (and realistic) enough to know that the amount of sex portrayed is not entirely accurate (unless you plan on getting jiggy with your bioskills robot), the same may not hold true for the rest of the population. Yet another issue that arises in medical dramas lies in the sexualization of the patient. Settle down, marketing gurus, I know we are supposed to give the consumer what they want, and sex sells, right? But have medical drama writers taken it too far (not like home run far, but maybe third base far?)? While some of the cases are overtly sexual… Note the “sprightly” music. SO funny and lighthearted that she’s experiencing this agonizing and embarrassing...

How Your Phone Can Give a Physical

The Doctor’s Channel’s Michael Banks, MD and MedGadget’s Shiv Gaglani, MD-MBA candidate, bring you the future of the exam room: The Smartphone Physical. With the growing importance of mobility and data recording, physician tools combined with the capabilities of mobile technology will revolutionize the way clinicians evaluate their patients. Shown here are the PanOptic Ophthalmoscope, the AliveCor Heart Monitor, and the CellScope...

Ever Wonder How Your Brain Detects Motion?

Ever wonder how your brain detects motion? How you just missed getting hit by the foul ball when you were pretending to care about the game but were actually on instagram? Or how you were able to swat the annoying fly that’s always buzzing around your desk? Well, after 50 years of only having a vague idea of how the brain is able to detect motion, this week, three studies were published in Nature revealing the exact mechanism of this ability. Maybe you’ve never asked yourself these questions, but this video is an interesting explanation of how the brain is able to detect motion and the tools researchers are using to learn more about the brain. Check out the three articles in Nature (1, 2, and 3). Featured image is a screenshot taken  from the video...

How Accountable Care Will Change America

David Sayen, the regional manager for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, discusses the shift in health insurance programs from fee-for-service to an accountable care model. Reimbursement will be based on results, as opposed to type or quantity of procedures. He explains that the relationship between health care providers and programs, like Medicare and Medicaid, will change as the United States moves closer to healthcare reform. Filmed at FutureMed, in February, 2012, at Singularity...

Wild Worries of a Med Student

I lost my pager a few weeks ago. For most, the pager is a vestigial apparatus from the days before mobile phones, wireless, and permanent connectivity. But there was a dark time, not so long ago, when pagers were the only handheld device that worked in hospitals. Those black blocks managed to transmit signals, traveling, like Buzz Lightyear, to infinity and beyond. In some basement corridors, they still outperform iPhones, Blackberries, and possibly landlines. Imagine a flamingo without the pink, an elephant without its trunk, or a toilet without toilet paper. That’s a medical student without its pager. At first, I was resigned. I informed all and sundry, “dude, I lost my pager.” At first, it was refreshing. But soon, I became persona non grata on my team… the annoying person who had to be contacted through email or patchy 4G. I felt like a puppy without a leash. A few weeks in, it was becoming evident that I could not continue like this. In fact, it was blatant that I had neglected to replace my pager. The place where my pager used to be mocked me. It haunted my right pocket like a mournful ghost. I constantly reached for the phantom and made contact with air. Air and a hollow plastic case, clipped to my white coat, empty and silent. My phone dropped texts when I wandered the subterranean hospital...

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