The Many Definitions of Studying: None of Which Involve Studying

Once in med school, “I have to study” becomes the go-to excuse to get out of anything from that dreaded family reunion to doing your laundry (or practicing personal hygiene in general…). But let’s be real: Most of the time you are “studying” involves at least one of these...

The 4 Kinds Of New Year’s Resolutions, All Of Which Suck

Your New Year’s resolution is stupid and I hate it. Don’t take offense – I hate everyone’s New Year’s resolutions (including my own, which is to stop hating everything). Anyway, it’s not your fault: it’s impossible to make a good New Year’s resolution, unless you’re one of those people who can take a long look in the mirror and come up with a pearl of wisdom like, “Maybe I should stop doing so much Angel Dust.” There are essentially only four kinds of New Year’s resolutions and all of them are inherently terrible. They are shaped by two factors: practicality and desirability. Group #1: Impractical, Undesirable You don’t hear a lot of impractical, undesirable New Year’s resolutions, for obvious reasons. Then again, maybe we should try some of these out, as the other three clearly aren’t working either. Some examples of impractical and undesirable resolutions include: • This year, I will scream directly in the face of every person I encounter. • This year, I will gain a tremendous amount of weight and counter this weight gain by purchasing a series of increasingly smaller-sized coats. • This year, I will forget how to read (making medical school an increasingly difficult task). Group #2: Practical, Undesirable This is where the majority of resolutions foolishly fall. Let’s take running a marathon for example. Most people, with the proper mindset and dedication,...

The 6 Conditions You Will Never Learn to Treat

Countless hours in the library and anatomy lab, sleepless nights, sacrificed social time…you’d think you would learn it all in medical school. Dr. Fizzy shows us that not all conditions are taught in med...

What Started Out as Revenge for One Doc Has Turned into Something Beautiful

They didn’t believe we’d do it. But we did it. Turntable Health is open for bid-ness. For REAL tho. We had an insane grand opening. We got a day named after us. And the ZPupp helped cut the cord. And there was all kinds of press, including Morgan Spurlock all up in our grillz. And now that we’re humming, it’s time to get back to the rap game. For REAL tho. Stay...

When Practice Really Does Make Perfect

Many medical schools recognize that “practice makes perfect”, or close to perfect, when it comes to providing quality patient care. So, medical schools around the country have incorporated role-play acting and simulations into their curriculum to prepare students for real life clinical encounters by developing their communication and diagnostic skills. And, these faux examinations have proven even more beneficial than as just an educational tool. Ryan Jones, fourth year medical student at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, truly played the role of doctor in one of these educational situations. When examining actors pretending to suffer from specific conditions, Jones discovered that one of the actors had a true and life-threatening medical condition. Actor Jim Malloy was diagnosed by Ryan with an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The supervising doctor confirmed the diagnosis and soon after Malloy underwent surgery to have it removed. This educational exercise certainly tested Jones; not only did he receive credit for this examination but also for saving a life. These are the stories we love to share because they inspire students and remind them of the importance of their hard work, knowledge, and communication skills. Congratulations to Ryan Jones for saving a life as an “Almost”...

“There’s Something Else…” Incidental Findings and the Modern Physician

Last month, The Atlantic published a great piece on the phenomenon of incidental findings uncovered during routine medical exams. It’s not all that uncommon; some reports state that incidental findings show up in ⅓ of CT scans. I myself had an abdominal CT scan several years ago and the radiologist found that I have a second spleen; clinically referred to as an “accessory spleen” (which makes me imagine it as a little spleen purse that my spleen has slung over it’s shoulder). Incidental findings that are benign — like a spleen purse — are pretty neutral; no additional tests required, no monitoring, no surgery. Just something fun to share at parties. But other findings, like tumors, can lead patients and doctors down a treacherous (and pricey) path. The fact that incidental findings get uncovered isn’t the issue; defensive medicine is what complicates it. Even if a doctor can say, with resounding confidence, that an incidental finding is not going to pose a problem for the patient, they have to order a slew of tests in order to save themselves from a potential lawsuit down the road. This puts stress on not just the physician, but the patient too, particularly if they’re uninsured. And should the patient choose to forgo the tests, the emotional strain of asking “what if?” can lead to depression, anxiety and all the associated health problems those conditions present. To Scan...

How Information Can Be Extracted From The Brain

Philip Low, PhD, the founder, chairman and CEO of NeuroVigil, discusses the evolution of highly sensitive brain sensors that can see 5-times more signal than previous tools. Using these sensors allows for data that is largely uncorrupted and is retrieved non-invasively. Filmed at FutureMed, in February, 2012, at Singularity...

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