Nerdtastic Scholarship Winner: 5 Things I Learned About Being an ER Doc from Nintendo

1. Duck Hunt taught me not to shoot the messenger It’s OK to admit it…we all did it too. At one time or another, when nobody was looking, we all tried to shoot the dog in Duck Hunt. Regardless if he was jumping behind the bushes or laughing at us when we missed, we all took a few shots to put that pooch in his place! If you stick around medicine long enough, it is inevitable that specimens will get lost, machines will error and blood will hemolyze. Yes it will be frustrating, but don’t take it out on the person who is relaying the news. Not only will it make you an unlikeable doctor, but there is a good chance that the person giving you the result is not responsible for it. Even if they are, everybody makes mistakes; give them a break. At least they didn’t try to take out their anger by shooting a digital dog! 2. Super Mario Brothers 3 taught me to be humble The coolest part about Super Mario Brothers 3 was all the different costumes that he got to wear. If you needed to fly, you could become Raccoon Mario. Swim? Frog Mario. Ice? Tanooki Mario. Before Apple had “…an app for that,” Mario had a suit for it! Although you could get past most levels as just plain Mario, it was...

Zohydro: FDA Approves a New Opiate

The FDA just approved a new prescription painkiller, called Zohydro. Similar to medicine’s current favorite painkiller, Oxycodone, but 10x more powerful, Zohydro is expected to be available next month. Considering the epidemic of opiate addiction and over-prescribing of medication, this new approval has many professionals concerned. It’s been developed with chronic pain sufferers in mind– specifically those with cancer–hence the very high dose (upwards of 50 mg in a single pill). Professionals are also concerned about the potential for accidental overdose: a single Zohydro pill contains enough hydrocodone to kill a child, and it would be reasonable to assume, what with patients already struggling to manage multiple medications, there could be fatal accidental overdoses with such a potent medication. Then, there’s the issue of pure tolerance for opioids: someone who hasn’t taken them before could overdose on just two pills. Though the drug may prove to have benefits to chronic pain suffers, hopefully doctors and healthcare practitioners will be properly educated on the risks. In response to the concerns expressed since its approval, the company that created Zohydro has said in a statement that the medication “will come with a warning...

Top 5 TV Shows to Procrastinate With

  If your method of studying is anything like mine, the night before a big test you can usually be found marathon-watching Grey’s Anatomy or The Walking Dead. If this ISN’T how you typically prepare for your exams then I don’t even want to know you. Just kidding. Seriously though, there is an art to procrastination and it involves being able to blow through copious episodes of your favorite show and still manage to get good grades because you have achieved the ability to study simultaneously. With that in mind, here is a list of amazing shows that will challenge your carefully cultivated ability to study-watch and be productive because they’re so freaking amazing that your eyes will be glued to your screen instead of your anatomy atlas.   1. Sons of Anarchy I don’t even know what to say about this show except it’s a must watch. I didn’t think I would really get into it but the acting is amazing and the plot arcs are very well developed so before you know it the crazy escapades of a gun-running motorcycle gang in a small town in California have drawn you in and it’s 2 AM. The protagonist, Jax Teller, is portrayed perfectly by actor Charlie Hunnam and he really brings believability to his character’s moral quandaries and growth as a young father. The first five seasons are...

Time Flies When You’re in Med School

I remember the first day of medical school. It was August 1, 2010. My boyfriend and I had just arrived in the city two days prior, being met by 100+ degree weather, and the temperature this particular day was not any different. Despite wearing a thin blouse and some light slacks, carrying my cardigan as I traversed the intersection from my apartment, I was completely drenched in sweat by the time I arrived to campus. Great. And it’s only going to get hotter, I thought. As I sat in a classroom among scores of strange faces, many of which were already chatting in small groups and perhaps had even known each other from undergrad, I wondered about these individuals. Who would I befriend? Was I going to fit in here? What will they think of my non-traditional path to medicine (read: former slackery life)? I wondered about the real identities of the people I’d exchanged countless conversations with on SDN and discovered that the school admin actually followed the website, identifying me by my Internet alias 15 minutes into our first session. We had a string of introductory, house-keeping type talks from various faculty and administrators, and by the end of that first day, I felt good about all the people I had met and was happy with my decision to come to school here. Over the next two years, I...

How To Take The Perfect Nap

Sleep is an amazing thing, and something that most medical students don’t get enough of. Yes, sometimes pulling an all-nighter to study is necessary, but no matter how many hours you study, catching an ample amount of those precious Zzzs will allow you to recall information, think quickly and clearly, and subsequently, pass your exam. When you really don’t have time to get a full night’s sleep, a nap can make you feel refreshed both physically and mentally. Here are some great tips to make sure you optimize your nap time. Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually. Infographic and featured image from http://visual.ly/...

5 Must-Know Eye Conditions for any Opthalmology Exam

While most of the ABIM Examination topics fall neatly into organ system categories, not all of them fit into this schematic. These include: ophthalmology, primary care screening guidelines, vaccinations, etc. Here at Knowmedge, we’ve incorporated this important group of subject areas into General Internal Medicine, similar to the American College of Physicians’ Internal Medicine In-Training Exam Blueprint. Today, in this first of a series of blogs, we review the key eye diseases: Conjunctivitis, Macular Degeneration, Glaucoma, Retinal Detachment, and Cataracts. The eyes may see only what the mind knows, but your mind should know these eye conditions for the ABIM exam. The exam is several months away so go ahead and bookmark this page so you can quickly review it once more in the days before you obtain your certification or recertification.   1. Conjunctivitis Conjunctivitis is broken down into viral, bacterial, and allergic conjunctivitis Viral • Usually caused by adenovirus • Having a preceding upper respiratory infection or recent exposure to a person with conjunctivitis are clues to aid in the diagnosis • Acute onset • Usually unilateral redness • Watery discharge is present • Highly contagious • Frequent hand washing must be performed to prevent spread of infection • Supportive treatment including cold compresses and artificial tears. NO role for antibiotic eye drops with viral conjunctivitis   Bacterial • Common causing agents are Staph aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae,...

5 Medical Breakthroughs That Will Change The World by 2020

Salim Ismail, the founding executive director of Singularity University, gives you the top 5 medical breakthroughs that will revolutionize the healthcare sector by 2020. Read more about Salim Ismail. Filmed at FutureMed, in February 2013, at Singularity...

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