Last Year 1,700 Students Didn’t Match, And The Numbers Are Only Getting Worse

Every year, more and more graduating medical students are not matching. This is a huge problem not only for these medical students who are without jobs, but also for America’s growing physician shortage. Learn more at...

Best of the Best: Our 6 Favorite Tweets From Match Week

Match Day is just a day away! While this day causes many 4th year med students an almost unbearable about of anxiety, let’s not forget that it is also a very exciting and rewarding time! We’ve had our eyes out for the best tweets of Match Week to share and celebrate the success of all M4s. Good luck!!   1. I feel like you can’t look at this picture and without feeling happy and excited. We truly enjoy seeing smiling faces for dreams made a reality!   2. As difficult as it is sometimes, following your dreams wholeheartedly will be worth it.   3. It’s always nice to hear someone who has already been in your shoes explain that going into medicine brought them happiness. I think that hearing these words of encouragement during times of great stress and uncertainty is reassuring and reminds med students of how fortunate they are to have reached their goals.   4. Awesome to see so many med students who’ve likely been through the rough times together now with huge smiles and enjoying each other’s success. For me, this demonstrates the importance of collaborating and building relationships in med school. Gotta have people by your side for the good times and the bad!   5. Not only is Match Day exciting for the M4s who match, but also for their friends and family....

How Remus Lupin and Yoda Taught Me the Power of Mentorship

A big part of medical education is mentoring. The term ‘mentor’ originates from Homer’s the Odyssey and refers to an advisor. The roles of mentors vary, but generally serve to guide mentees through work, support them during the process, keep them grounded and focused on the task at hand, and provide general moral support. Over the weekend, at the Pritzker Revisit session on Scholarship and Discovery, our own students stated the number one thing to consider when finding a project was finding a great mentor. How does one find a great mentor? Well, our students are encouraged to seek “CAPE” mentors- think Superhero mentors. The mentor should be Capable, Available, have a Project that is of interest to the student, and Easy to get along with.  Capable means that the mentor has the skills to not only be a good mentor, but also to carry out the task or project at hand. This may sound odd, but sometimes faculty are so excited to have a medical student work for them, they may make the false assumption that the medical student will help them with tasks (i.e. statistics) that they themselves don’t know. Availability is especially important as the number one reason our students state they had a less than optimal experience in the summer doing scholarly work is that their mentor was not available. While availability of all doctors is an issue, the question is often whether...

The 80 Second Refresher on Parts of the Brain… by The Brain

If you’re in need of a a quick 80 second refresher on the parts of the brain, who better to teach you than Brain? (and Pinky, of...

The 2 Minute Cure for All Your Exam Anxieties: Meditate with an Expert

It’s that time of year again for med students. That word, finals, is enough to give you a massive headache, but have no fear. Nina Smiley, PhD, has exactly what you need to calm your hypercaffeinated nerves. So drop your 17 highlighters, close those books, and take a few minutes to calm your...

The Unsustainable SGR

So I must apologize.  Amidst my destroying your medical school innocence with posts about student debt, floundering federal GME, and the reality of the government shutdown, I referenced SGR but never actually shared that horror.  Maybe it was regression to a happier time, or a little folie à deux (can you tell I’ve had my Psych rotation?), but SGR has been the bane of my time in policy.  And I want it to be yours. SGR, formally known as the Sustainable Growth Rate, was a formula developed under none other than the Balanced Budget Act (the same one that set the cap for GME-funded residency slots at 100,000) to determine the Centers for Medicare And Medicaid Services (CMS) reimbursement payments to physicians.  And because the universe loves a good cosmic joke, SGR had been developed to replace a flawed payment system.  At a basic level, the theory of this formula was that a conversion factor could be used to balance yearly spending in healthcare. Here’s how the formula works.  Each year CMS projects their spending on healthcare for the coming year.  At the end of the year, if there is money left over, it gets rolled over to the next year’s budget by changing the conversion factor (guess how many times that has happened).  And if, by some unforeseeable tragedy, spending outstripped the projection, the deficit is taken from...

What Does the AOA/ACGME Residency Merger Mean for Medical Students?

In a statement released in late February 2014, the AOA and the ACGME announced they have finally agreed to a single accreditation system for graduate medical education. The surprising news comes on the heels of previously failed negotiations in July 2013. From the official press release:   – From July 1, 2015 to June 30, 2020, AOA-accredited training programs will transition to ACGME recognition and accreditation. – There will continue to be osteopathic-focused training programs under the ACGME accreditation system. Two osteopathic review committees will be developed to evaluate and set standards for the osteopathic aspects of training programs seeking osteopathic recognition. – DOs and MDs would have access to all training programs. There will be prerequisite competencies and a recommended program of training for MD graduates who apply for entry into osteopathic-focused programs. – AOA and AACOM will become ACGME member organizations, and each will have representation on ACGME’s board of directors.   What does this mean for current medical students, MD and DO alike?   – The inevitability of a common match: Given all residency programs will fall under a single unification banner by 2020, a single match process is the next logical step. The current system, which forces DO students to choose between the AOA match in February and ACGME match in March, will be streamlined to allow medical students to apply to all US-based residencies at the same time. There is no exact date for...

Page 160 of 196‹ First...10...159160161...170...Last ›