What Does the Doc Say? A ZDogg Parody

What does the Doc say? Finally a parody on “What does the Fox say?” for med students! see more my ZDoggMD here. Featured image is a screen shot from the video...

The Adverse Effects of Med School on ADLs

Med school doesn’t only take its toll on your...

SketchyMicro Aims To Make Medical Micro Really Easy (And Even Fun)

Medical microbiology is a tough subject. For any given bacteria, virus, or fungus, medical students must memorize how it clinically presents, the specific pathogenic mechanism, treatment options, and relevant laboratory tests. Taking Vibrio cholera for example, medical students learn to associate the buzzwords of “rice-water stool” and “comma-shaped” all while understanding the increase in cAMP production due to activation of a Gs protein. Three UC Irvine medical students figured there had to be a better way to learn these associations than through brute memorization, and born out of this frustration came SketchyMicro, a “learning modality that utilizes visual learning as its primary form of teaching” according to Andrew Berg, one of the co-founders. The approach capitalizes on the Baker/baker principle in order to increase recall and learning efficiency for students preparing for their USMLE Step 1 and COMLEX Level 1 exams. “We draw cool pictures to teach microbiology” -Andrew Berg, co-founder of SketchyMicro SketchyMicro is now accepting pre-orders at $39.99, which includes instant access to 21 of their videos and 6 months of additional rolling access when the program officially launches with 44 videos in late 2013. Read the full interview with SketchyMicro co-founder Andrew Berg at...

Medical Mystery: Commotion of the Heart

This week The Huffington Post published a brief story on a young woman who died when she fell onto the sand while at the beach. She died from the impact of the fall, which caused a rare occurrence in her heart, commotio cordis (latin for “commotion or disruption of the heart”) killing her within minutes.  A study published in the Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine on November 1st took a closer look at the case. Commotio cordis is extremely rare, killing only two to four people each year, and while it can happen to anyone, it seems to most often affect young people who, either as the result of age or weight, have less fat padding around their heart, leaving their heart vulnerable to impact. Even though some youth athletic associations have begun using chest pads, those shields are meant to protect from soft tissue damage and broken ribs, not the impact of the body hitting the ground, or say, with a baseball bat, which essentially makes the heart “jump” out of rhythm. This arrhythmia (called ventricular fibrillation) proves to be fatal; even in cases where the cardiac chain of survival is initiated immediately (like at sporting events, where an AED is present) sudden cardiac arrest is not always immediately recognized. Sudden deaths of young athletes on the field is nothing new, unfortunately. Local papers are often riddled...

What Every “Almost” Doc Should Know About Marijuana

The legalization of marijuana has been a hot topic of debate over the past few years. Some people further the support the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes. In this video, Martin Lee, writer and activist and author of the book “Smoke Signals,” discusses the implication of marijuana in the treatment of several diseases and disorders and calls for the future generation of doctors to become informed of the potential for both the psychoactive and non-psychoactive compounds in marijuana to provide an effective treatment for those suffering from such...

Is an MD/PhD Right for You?

So you are considering applying to an MD/PhD program. How do you really know that it’s the right choice for you? Take this quiz to help you decide whether or not the program is suited for you! 1.   When others ask me what I want to do with my life, my first thought is: a.   I want to practice medicine b.   I want to start my own lab c.   I want to be an academic or hospital administrator d.   I want to teach   2.   When I consider what branch of medicine I may go into, I am most leaning towards: a.   Family medicine/primary care b.   Surgery c.   Internal medicine specialty d.   Pathology   3.   When I think about spending 8 years in school, my thought is: a.   Great! I can delay entering the “real world” b.   I know it’s long, but it will be worth it in the end c.    I’m still not entirely sure how I feel about it d.   I won’t lie. It’s a major turn off.   4.   In the far future, I envision splitting my time: a.   80% medicine, 20% research b.   20% medicine, 80% research c.   50% medicine, 50% research d.   ~100% research with a sporadic encounter with patients every now and then   5.   In my mind, the major perk of pursuing a combined MD/PhD is: a.   Free tuition and an annual...

A Post-Thanksgiving Fantasy

I hope you all enjoyed your Thanksgivings! Given the grotesque amount of food Aunt Sue (Aunt Sue alwaysss out-does herself, right?) served this year, you’re likely in a food coma. Wouldn’t it be amazing if said food coma came equipped with an IV full of medical...

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