The Different Types of Doctor (Bad) Handwriting

Lately I’ve been noticing that it isn’t just that doctors have bad handwriting, in general. There are actually many different types of bad handwriting:...

How to Train Your Dragon in the 21st Century

You know what you never see on Grey’s Anatomy? McDreamy sitting down at 3 am to dictate on a patient. Or write a note in their chart. Hell, I don’t even remember seeing a doctor on that show even look at a patient’s chart, let alone glean any valuable information from it.  And you know why? Because it ain’t glamorous. No one becomes a doctor because they love to document. But the reality is, whether or not you enjoy it, documenting on patients is one of the most vital aspects of treating them– and, of course, getting paid. Often, it’s the latter that get’s a physician’s butt in gear when it comes to completing their deficient dictation on patients. You young people, freshly minted MD’s, are probably thinking, “No! I’ll never be like that! I’ll document really well and make my patient’s care transitions seamless! Coders and billers will love me!” Actually, if you’re like most noobs, you’re probably thinking, “What? You mean I have to do the things to my patients and then write down all the things I do to prove I did the thing? Why do I have to justify doing the thing? Can’t I just do the things?” No, Dr. Noob. You cannot just do the things. And it’s not because we don’t trust you, or don’t think you’re making good choices. It’s just because...

What Caused the Author of Moby Dick to Shrink an Inch and a Half?

John J. Ross, MD, instructor at Harvard Medical School, author of Shakespeare’s Tremor and Orwell’s Cough: Medical Lives of Famous Writers, discusses the medical history of Herman Melville and his diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis. Read more about Melville’s ailments. Learn more about John J. Ross, MD and his latest work, Shakespeare’s Tremor and Orwell’s Cough: Medical Lives of Famous...

What in the world is ASMR?

I recently came across a really interesting, but also relatively bizarre concept, ASMR. ASMR stands for Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response – allow me to explain. Autonomous: refers to the subjective nature of the phenomenon Sensory: refers to the sensory input that trigger the phenomenon Meridian: is apparently a euphemism for orgasm Response: yeah, just as it sounds It’s a physical sensation experience in response to external stimuli, usually soft noises of whispering or mundane sounds of objects. But what exactly is the physical sensation? It’s a tingling, warm, relaxing feeling that often starts in the back of the head and can travel down your spine, arms, and legs. It can also just consist of a feeling of overall relaxation, putting the person almost in a trance state. Many people use ASMR simply to relax. The videos consist of people completing mundane tasks such as doing their makeup or drawing an intricate picture. Usually, the videographer is also whispering, further stimulating their audience. In this video, the girl literally talks about her makeup collection for half an hour. No one expects you to watch the whole thing (unless you are an ASMR-er) but just to give you an idea…(I personally just got frustrated by how long it was taking her to complete thoughts – so much for that whole relaxing thing.) While doing my ASMR research I also came across...

Virtual Reality Behavioral Therapy

Jeremy Bailenson, the director for the Virtual Human Interaction Lab at Stanford University, talks about the power of virtual reality technology to create behavioral change, especially in the challenging area of lifestyle modification. Filmed at FutureMed, in February, 2012, at Singularity...

Inspirational Quotes For Living In Your 20s

“I can’t dislike you, but I will say this to you: you haven’t got long before you are all going to kill yourselves, because you are all crazy. And you can project it back at me, but I am only what lives inside each and every one of you.” – Charles Manson “Every man has inside himself a parasitic being who is acting not at all to his advantage.” – Ronald Reagan “You’ve had your whole fucking life to think things over. What good’s a few minutes more gonna do you now?” – Excerpt from The Shining, as delivered by a crazed Jack Nicholson “The cadaver’s pubes have a cowlick.” – Excerpt from Elvis Presley’s autopsy “There are lesions on the legions…” – Walt Disney “My psychiatrist told me I was crazy and I said I want a second opinion. He said okay, you’re ugly too.” – Rodney Dangerfield “They all feel the need for something. What we sense after the film is that the natural sources of pleasure have been replaced with higher-octane substitutes, which have burnt out the ability to feel joy. Going through the motions of what once gave them escape, they feel curiously trapped.” – Excerpt from Roger Ebert’s review of The Ice Storm “Did I do that?” – Urkel, overheard while watching footage of Tiananmen Square “If one commits the act of sodomy with a cow,...

Sir William Osler Was “Most Worthless” Student on the Wards

MONTREAL, CANADA – He may be the exalted father of modern medical education and the hallowed champion of medical reason, but devastating new evidence shows that Sir William Osler’s early beginnings in medicine were lackluster at best. Recently uncovered academic reviews of his performance by upper level trainees at the McGill University’s Medical College in Montreal, show he was highly unpopular on the hospital wards. Unearthed from the vaults of the McGill registrar’s office, these scathing clerkship reviews show a remarkably different side of Western medicine’s greatest hero. Upper level trainees criticized both his work ethic and his professionalism. It appears he was plagued by inefficiency and hampered by frivolous medical curiosity. “Yea, had I a sixpence for ev’ry hour that this cursed Osler spent poking some hepatic trolle’s stomach instead of getting his work done, I wouldn’t be toiling in this armpit of a hospital!” “…Nigh, we caught him loafing in the latrine with a useless tome of physiology whilst the rest of the medical team were busy leeching the pneumonia patients.” “I asked him to go and bleed a patient afflicted by female hysteria…and he looks he at me with his imbecilic mustached stare and says he has surpassed his work hours limit and needs to go home. He then proceeded to question my discernment about bleeding the patient at all!!!” Others pointed to a distracted lack...

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