1 is 2 Many, We Need Your Help

Sexual assault is a serious problem all over the world, but you can help stop it! I believe that one of the best practices in solving a problem is to start by honestly talking about it. By sharing your concerns, thoughts and feelings, you provide others with information about an important topic, spread awareness and allow people to feel more comfortable discussing potential solutions. And, all you docs and “almost” docs are extremely influential people who can make a difference. So please, join the initiative to put sexual assault to an end! Because 1 is 2 many….     Featured image is edited screen shot from video...

An Instructional Guide to Pregaming

Pregame (v.) – To drink before an event (which may or may not also involve drinking), typically at a rapid and immoderate pace. Pregaming is a based on the theory “Too much of a good thing is an even better thing.” Or, as George Burns once said, “It only takes one drink to get me loaded. Trouble is, I can’t remember if it’s the thirteenth or fourteenth.” Now that classes are finally winding down, hopefully some of you (mostly first years) are going to spend a little less time in the library and a little more time being drunk. Not surprisingly, the principles of pregaming generally aren’t embraced by society outside the realm of drinking. Recall, for example, your mother reprimanding you for snacking before dinner, warning that “you’ll ruin your appetite!” I suppose the best analogous would be stretching before exercise. However, there are discrepancies: First of all, the idea behind stretching is to warm up your muscles and prevent yourself from straining or pulling any of them, as well as to improve performance by preparing your body for exertion. Conversely, pregaming doesn’t exactly prepare your body for drinking – it’s not like it “loosens up” your liver or “stretches out” your esophagus. It also doesn’t improve drinking performance, unless you assess high-performance drinking by the quantity of bad decisions you make or the quality of your resulting...

24 Innacurate Medical Things That Happen on Every Single Episode of House, MD

House, MD is now on Netflix. So, obviously I’m spending every iota of free time watching it, from the beginning, and I’m realizing that there’s actually a fairly predictable diagnostic pattern. For the ease of writing, no doubt, and not a reflection on population health measures. 1. Fainting: someone, a patient or a family member or a doctor. Syncope, as it’s termed in the medical world can be a prodrome to an illness (meaning, it happens before you realize how sick you actually are) or can be in response to pain or illness (a vasovagal response).   2. Liver failure/someone’s yellow: okay, the fainting I can believe but this much jaundice? Why is everyone’s liver failing!   3. The “-osises” – someone either ironically or legitimately suggests it might be 1) sarcoidosis 2) amyloidosis or 3) hemochromotosis   4. Surgeries – How are all these doctors also surgeons? FYI, what House et al. do is more along the lines of what a hospitalist would do, not a surgeon.   5. Snooping – No, you can’t just walk into someone’s house to sniff around for lead/toxins/look for possible sources of botulism. Ain’t nobody got time for that.   6. Sexual longing – Patients and doctors, doctors and doctors, doctors and patients.   7. Test ordering – No doctor could ever get away with ordering so many tests. Also, doesn’t it seem like half the time the results are messed up...

Should Doctors Get MBAs?

Arlen Meyers, MD, MBA, President and CEO, Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, discusses the benefits of an MBA for physicians. He explains each of the vital 4 C’s offered by MBA programs: 1) Connections 2) Credentials 3) Credibility 4)...

ZDogg MD’s Lethal Dis Rap Exposes Dr. OZ

Every now and then, like most other A-list celebrities, I get recognized in public by strangers. The latest occurrence was in the echo lab in our hospital. A tech, whom I had never seen or met before, asked me what my next video was going to be about. Delighted, I introduced myself formally, puffed out my chest, slicked back my three remaining hairs, and proudly proclaimed that I would be ripping “America’s Doctor” a new one. “That’s right,” I effused. “I’m doing a Doctor Oz dis rap. He’s about to get SERVED! Boo-ya! What WHAT? Whoop, there it is! Oh no he didn’t!” It immediately became so quiet in the room, I swore I could hear the ultrasonic echo waves daintily reflecting off the nearby patient’s calcific mitral annulus. The female technician’s shriek pierced the silence. “What?! Why would you insult a national treasure like Dr. Oz? He’s taller, smarter, better looking, and infinitely more successful than you! Plus he doesn’t come in here EACH DAY, bragging about the ‘off-the-chain’ videos he’s been desperately foisting out on YouTube, only to come back the next day and introduce himself again like he’s never met me. You are a sad little man!” I casually grabbed a couple of day-old bagels and ambled towards the door, tripping over the echo machine power cord along the way. Why dis Dr. Oz, indeed? Let’s enumerate:...

5 Tips for Surviving Gross Anatomy

1. Understand anatomy is a relationship-driven class. The biggest struggle for me to overcome in anatomy was grasping how it differed so much from any class I took in college. Whereas biochemistry, microbiology, and genetics were driven by concepts and pathways, anatomy is based on relationship and positions in space. Successful students understand anatomy is one of the rare classes that exists in three dimensions and gear their studying accordingly. 2. Engage in group review. With study guides, mnemonics, and other study strategies that I would have never thought of, my classmates played a large role in my understanding of anatomy. Two particularly helpful strategies we used in groups were crowd-sourcing large study guides in Google docs and engaging in questions and answer review sessions. 3. Come prepared to lab. Anatomy lab can take up to two-four hours two to three time a week, which represents a good-chunk of time you could be studying on your own. Coming prepared to lab with notes, handouts, or practice questions can help you make the most out of these precious hours rather than standing around and waiting for lab to be over. 4. Experiment with different learning resources. In terms of Anatomy atlases, Netter’s, Thieme’s, and Lipincott’s were the three that provided the best illustrations for studying. Your school’s library should have copies of all three on reserve, and I would recommend experimenting with all three before deciding which one...

You’re Graduating Medical School…But Are You Prepared for Residency?

This morning as I was brushing up on my medical news I came across an article in The New York Times’ Well blog entitled, “Are Med School Grads Prepared to Practice Medicine?” As an entering medical student of the Class of 2018 I was immediately drawn to the piece. Is it possible that I will spend the next 4 years of my life buried in books, engrossed by education, surrounded by patients and established physicians and still not be ready for residency? Oh god… The author of the article, Pauline Chen, M.D., recalls a specific occurrence that took place during her intern year. A fellow intern, who attended a school apparently uninterested in teaching phlebotomy, had spent nearly an hour poking and prodding a patient, attempting to find a vein. The patient, as one can imagine, was not thrilled, yelling, “I’ll hit you if you come near me again!” Another intern was able to help and perform the phlebotomy flawlessly, but admitted to being unprepared to prep a patient for surgery. The problem, thus, is the differential focus of medical schools in educating their students. While one school flawlessly prepares their students on oral presentation of a patient, another emphasizes careful reading of images. The discrepancies are unforgivable and highlight an even more important issue than lack of surgical skill: lack of communication. Instead of working as parts of a seamless and...

Page 151 of 194‹ First...10...150151152...160...Last ›