Top 10 Epic Libraries You Wish You Could Study In

Here’s to life, liberty, and the pursuit of an EPIC library. Go big (or go home, literally).   10. Trinity College Library | Dublin, Ireland Jedi Archives? Or renowned Irish library?   9. Your Private Study “Books are the plane, and the train, and the road. They are the destination, and the journey. They are home.” —Anna Quindlen      8. Bookshop Selexyz Dominicanen | Maastricht, Netherlands  An old cathedral renovated into a library. So much yes.   7. The NoMad Hotel | New York City, NY  Where classy meets classwork.   6. José Vasconcelos Library | Mexico City, Mexico Because who doesn’t want to look at the inside of a dinosaur while going over histology slides?!    5. The All-Nighter Library Lock me up and throw away the keys.   4. Of course, the quintessential bathroom library Dare to dream.   3. Bibliotheca Alexandrina | Alexandria, Egypt    Just hope that Caesar doesn’t stop by.   2. Library at the Shiba Ryotaro Memorial Museum | Osaka, Japan   Any library where you have to climb the equivalent of a small mountain to check out a volume just wins.   1. Wherever this is + a time machine.   Sometimes it’s not about where you study, but the people you choose to waste away your youth with under a stack of books.       Featured image from Tumblr...

Identity, Expectations and Choice: Asian Americans on the Premedical Track

Now that I am a college senior, the most pressing question on anyone’s mind seems to be, “What are you planning to do after graduation?” Many people are visibly unsurprised to hear that I have set my sights on medicine. Their eyes thank me for confirmation of what they guessed I would want. From people who know me well, this is a compliment—that if I keep working hard, I might make a good doctor someday—or, if not a compliment, at least a seal of approval, encouragement to fight the long fight in pursuit of my dream. From people who hardly know me, though, I start to wonder how much the Asian American stereotype affects their perception of me and other Asian premeds like me. And for a second, I start to wonder how our stories and our identities, shaped by the assumptions of others, might affect our own self-perceptions. When I told my parents that I wanted to pursue a career in medicine, they were supportive, but not too supportive, because they knew how difficult the path would be, and told me they didn’t want to influence my decision-making process. My maternal grandmother, on the other hand, kissed me on the cheek and thanked me. When I asked her why, she said it was because she never had a doctor she really trusted, and she wasn’t getting any younger....

Top 10 Mnemonics to Get You Through Med School

Sometimes even after reading over the same paragraph multiple times, the material just doesn’t stick. These mnemonics will help you effortlessly master important concepts that are high yield on the boards and guarantee your succes. 1) 5 parameters of the HPI (history of present illness): 2) Encapsulated organisms: 3) Inhibitors of Cytochrome P450: 4) To remember that the right lung is tri-lobed and the right side of the heart contains the tricuspid valve while the left lung is bi-lobed and the left side of the heart contains the bicuspid valve: 5) 12 Cranial Nerves (in consecutive order): 6) Branches of the Brachial Plexus: 7) X-linked Immunodeficiencies: 8) Most Common Symptoms and Bacterial Causes of Meningitis: 9) Anterior pituitary hormones: 10) Precursors in neurotransmitter synthesis (steps in order):     Featured image from Flickr / digiart2001 jason.kuffer   Correction: July 19, 2013 An earlier version of this post used incorrect wording for the third cranial nerve. This error has been...

ZDoggMD on MSNBC Live!

A Talking (Bald) Head Move over, Fareed Zakaria and Malcolm Gladwell…there’s a new fancy-pants policy wonk in town! One who gets a whopping 3 awkward minutes to ramble on national TV with MSNBC anchor Richard Lui…LIVE! Props were given to Turntable Health and disses to Jenny McCarthy, so I believe I can say with fair confidence: mission...

Chinese Researchers 3D Print Living Kidneys

Researchers at a university in eastern Zhejiang Province have used a 3D printer to create living kidneys, which are expected to be used for transplants in the...

Benefits of a Good Ol’ Fashion Vaginal Birth

The debate between natural delivery versus a cesarean delivery has been going on for centuries. Early references to the c-section appear in ancient texts, mythology and Roman history; though, not usually coupled with a glistening seal of approval. C-sections were, initially, a last ditch effort to save a baby in countries with dwindling populations; it was better to save the child and let the mother die an agonizing death. Although the term “cesarean section” is generally thought to have originated from the story of the birth of Julius Caesar, much about the origin of the nomenclature remains a mystery. For present-day expectant mothers, c-sections are no longer so mythical and, more importantly, so dangerous. Modern medicine has allowed not only for the procedure to be safe for mom, but more or less safe for baby as well (forgiving, of course, the occasional nick on the baby’s brow by the surgeon’s blade, as was the case with my nephew). C-sections have proliferated in modern culture to become a matter of preference rather than necessity. They are no longer reserved solely for emergencies; some moms may choose to schedule their cesarean purely for the convenience, or, as is sometimes noted about the stars in glossy tabloids, because they are “too posh to push.”  But just because we have the technology to allow c-sections to be more commonplace, science is still trying...

Every Career in Medicine Begins With a Story…Here’s Mine

In his book The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer, Siddhartha Mukherjee says, “Medicine … begins with storytelling. Patients tell stories to describe illness; doctors tell stories to understand it. Science tells its own story to explain diseases.” It is stories that give meaning to what we do, and so, I wish to tell you my grandmother’s story. I could barely recognize my grandmother’s frail body as she lay on a hospital bed in the room that was once her dining room. She asked what the weather was like outside. Fighting back tears, I told her it was a nice sunny day and there were robins on the bird feeders that she liked to watch on her deck. It was comforting to see her face light up at the thought, but I knew it was really a gloomy April day with no birds in sight. I did everything that I could to not think of the tumor growing in her bladder that day, but like a tumor in my mind, the realization that this was her end was growing into an overwhelming force. Each time she exhaled, there would be a long pause where I would stroke her hand fearing she would never breathe again. Her sister told her what I did not have the strength to: “You are dying.” The family knew since her diagnosis that...

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