What Started Out as Revenge for One Doc Has Turned into Something Beautiful

They didn’t believe we’d do it. But we did it. Turntable Health is open for bid-ness. For REAL tho. We had an insane grand opening. We got a day named after us. And the ZPupp helped cut the cord. And there was all kinds of press, including Morgan Spurlock all up in our grillz. And now that we’re humming, it’s time to get back to the rap game. For REAL tho. Stay...

When Practice Really Does Make Perfect

Many medical schools recognize that “practice makes perfect”, or close to perfect, when it comes to providing quality patient care. So, medical schools around the country have incorporated role-play acting and simulations into their curriculum to prepare students for real life clinical encounters by developing their communication and diagnostic skills. And, these faux examinations have proven even more beneficial than as just an educational tool. Ryan Jones, fourth year medical student at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, truly played the role of doctor in one of these educational situations. When examining actors pretending to suffer from specific conditions, Jones discovered that one of the actors had a true and life-threatening medical condition. Actor Jim Malloy was diagnosed by Ryan with an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The supervising doctor confirmed the diagnosis and soon after Malloy underwent surgery to have it removed. This educational exercise certainly tested Jones; not only did he receive credit for this examination but also for saving a life. These are the stories we love to share because they inspire students and remind them of the importance of their hard work, knowledge, and communication skills. Congratulations to Ryan Jones for saving a life as an “Almost”...

“There’s Something Else…” Incidental Findings and the Modern Physician

Last month, The Atlantic published a great piece on the phenomenon of incidental findings uncovered during routine medical exams. It’s not all that uncommon; some reports state that incidental findings show up in ⅓ of CT scans. I myself had an abdominal CT scan several years ago and the radiologist found that I have a second spleen; clinically referred to as an “accessory spleen” (which makes me imagine it as a little spleen purse that my spleen has slung over it’s shoulder). Incidental findings that are benign — like a spleen purse — are pretty neutral; no additional tests required, no monitoring, no surgery. Just something fun to share at parties. But other findings, like tumors, can lead patients and doctors down a treacherous (and pricey) path. The fact that incidental findings get uncovered isn’t the issue; defensive medicine is what complicates it. Even if a doctor can say, with resounding confidence, that an incidental finding is not going to pose a problem for the patient, they have to order a slew of tests in order to save themselves from a potential lawsuit down the road. This puts stress on not just the physician, but the patient too, particularly if they’re uninsured. And should the patient choose to forgo the tests, the emotional strain of asking “what if?” can lead to depression, anxiety and all the associated health problems those conditions present. To Scan...

How Information Can Be Extracted From The Brain

Philip Low, PhD, the founder, chairman and CEO of NeuroVigil, discusses the evolution of highly sensitive brain sensors that can see 5-times more signal than previous tools. Using these sensors allows for data that is largely uncorrupted and is retrieved non-invasively. Filmed at FutureMed, in February, 2012, at Singularity...

What You Need to Know About Holistic Review

Holistic review is undeniably a hot topic in the medical school admissions world currently. For traditional and non-traditional premeds alike, applying to a school that employs holistic review is becoming more desirable because of the simple fact that these admissions committees place less emphasis on having a perfect MCAT and a stellar GPA and instead try to get to know the student behind the application. Rather than narrowing their search to applicants who fit a certain cookie-cutter criteria, they look for students who exhibit excellence in all aspects of their life – not just their scores and experiences on paper but their previous work, achievements and the background that brought them to where they are today. The attitude is that everything about the student, even the parts that are unrelated to medicine, help tell their story and can attest to why they would succeed in medical school. Because of all the buzz I was hearing about this new style of admissions review, a little while ago I created a list of schools that either explicity state or otherwise imply that they use holistic review when looking at their applicants. I primarily found schools by looking at this report released by the AAMC and the rest I found on my own. With that in mind please know that this is by no means a comprehensive list so if you are aware...

10 Signs You Were Meant to Be an ED Doc

Whether you’re an aspiring emergency physician or a seasoned pro with decades of experience, there are some commonalities that most emergency docs seem to share. Here are 10 signs you just might be an ED doc: 1. What some may refer to as chaos, you call a typical day in the department:   2. I&Ds make you giddy. Something about draining an abscess is just so gratifying. 3. The X games is pretty much your every day life. Your hobbies include backcountry skiing while blindfolded, ultramarathoning in 118 degree Phoenix weather, and have participated in ride across America. Twice in the same day even. 4. “Regular” hours? What are “regular” hours? This past week, you’ve gone from days to nights, nights to swing, and then back to days again, but that’s just the way you like it. 5. You own at least 5 articles of North Face clothing.  Interestingly, none of them happen to be in any neutral colors. 6. You were torn between every specialty. At some point in your career, you swore you were going to do trauma surgery, obstetrics, internal medicine, anesthesiology, and radiology, sometimes alternating between all of them in the same week before realizing you could do it all with EM. 7. You were able to combine altruism, learning another language, and exploring a new continent somehow during a recent work-related trip.  Meanwhile, all of your friends stateside were jealous. 8. You...

Bat Girl and The Milwaukee Protocol

Jeanna Giese was sitting in church one ordinary Sunday when suddenly, from above, a small bat flew in and interrupted the service. It was whacked aside by someone, and Jeanna went to the little bat’s aid. She was an animal lover, a devoted rescuer, and she thought the bat was pretty cute. As she cradled the stunned creature in her hand, she remembers that it suddenly bit her, sending a stinging pain through her finger and hand. She took it outside, where it detached from her and flew off into a nearby tree. Satisfied that she had returned the helpless creature back to nature, she rejoined the church service, having no idea that the nip of the cute little bat she saved was already starting to kill her; she was fifteen years old. Like many teenage girls of the early 2000s, Jeanna was involved in many social and athletic activities and enjoyed socializing with her peers. When she got sick several weeks later and had to sit out during a volleyball game, it occurred to her it might be more than a viral illness. When her mother asked why she hadn’t played any of the game, Jeanne told her she had double vision. After that, as she notes in her own account of the story on her personal website, she remembers very little about what happened. Meanwhile, at The...

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