Throw Away Those Chem Sets, Move Molecules Hands ‘Free’

Leap Motion. It might be the future of interactive computing, but is it worth all the hype? The $80 Leap motion is a user interface controller that allows for 3D gestures, already with an app store full of games, to boot. The gesture-based controller can track your hands moving in a field above a three inch sensor bar. With a 150-degree field of view, it can analyze the motion of all 10 fingers down to a 1/100th of a millimeter. So all that cool motion gesture stuff Tony Stark does while building the Iron Man suits …yeah, that could be you.   Check out this demo: Simply put, the possibilities are endless. One of the most popular applications in its app store is Molecules, “a molecular visualizer. It is a file viewer that allows you to display three-dimensional renderings of molecules and manipulate them using a Leap Motion Controller.” The Leap Motion Controller lets you move an open hand in three dimensions to rotate and scale the molecular structure faster than you could with the 2-D input of a mouse. Lateral translation of a structure is accomplished by moving two open hands in parallel. So throw away those chemistry sets, this stuff is way more fun. The featured image is from...

Why We Should All Be Kids Again and Play Games

We all miss games. Tag. Red light, green light. Red rover, red rover….and those are just the classics. Check out why all games are actually good for you, and your learning capabilities!

Hospitalists! (‘Popular’ Parody From Wicked)

Short list of things to do when one moves to Las Vegas: 1. Treat gambling addiction with paradoxical chronic immersion therapy. Always bet on black! (and lose 50% of the time) 2. Eat at epic buffets at least twice daily. Obtain gastric bypass from one of several world-renowned local bariatric surgeons. Subsequently suffer from dumping syndrome. 3. Create fierce musical parody of the amazingly catchy tune “Popular” from the amazingly catchy musical “Wicked” (which can only be watched in it’s full glory at the brand new Smith Center for the Performing Arts in sunny Downtown Vegas)! Yes, dear friends, one out of three ain’t bad. And I’m certainly working on the other two. ZDoggMD Industries is proud to collaborate with the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM) to promote their epic national conference May 16-19 just outside of Washington D.C.! Sweet hotel, big party, and…oh yeah, CME and whatnot. Mad love to UMC Hospital right here in Downtown Vegas for letting us shoot on their wards and hijack their off-duty nurses and administrators. And super props to Josh.0 and our camera crew: Johnie Wood (camera op) – www.johniewood.com Andrew Dang (camera op) – www.dangfilmmaking.com Allyson Limon (bts photographer/choreographer) – www.allysonlimon.com   Lyrics for Hospitalists! (A Parody of “Popular” From The Musical Wicked): (DOWNLOAD SONG HERE!)   Whenever I see doctors less up to date than I (And let’s face it, even Up To Date’s less up to date...

23 and Me (& Me), Part I: A Twenty-Something Explores Her Genome

I was saving up to buy a desk so that I can stop writing from bed (not that there’s anything inherently wrong with that) but instead, I decided that for $100, I would send my spit to 23 & Me and find out everything that science can tell me about my DNA. 23 & Me is a genotyping service started by the woman who is married to a co-founder of Google–Anne Wojcicki. It used to be a lot more expensive to have this genotyping done; upwards of $1,000 when the project was piloted, but due to grants and funding for more research, Wojcicki has been able to significantly decrease the price, hoping that will entice folks to participate. Playing into, perhaps, our natural curiosity about our bodies and our sometimes incessant narcissism (something that social media has used to its advantage from the get go: Myspace, anyone?), 23 & Me offers us a glimpse into the inner framework of our very being. That being said, it is only a portion of our DNA that can be genotyped. For purposes of liability, I presume, there are many disclaimers throughout the entire service that enumerate the minor detail that just because their lab doesn’t find you to have one of the 2 mutations that they’re testing for, that would possibly cause a disease, it doesn’t mean that you don’t have one...

Doctor’s Without Borders Reports Unprecedented Chemical Victims in Syria

An announcement from Doctors Without Borders has confirmed that three hospitals in Syria’s Damascus have reported over 3,600 patients arriving at their clinics with neurotoxic symptoms. Of the 3,600 patients who arrived within three hours, 355 have been reported dead. Doctors Without Borders, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), says that patients arrived with symptoms such as convulsions, excessive saliva, and pointed pupils, all signs of a neurotoxic agent. MSF has been using atropine to treat the patients. There is much concern over the violation of international humanitarian law, due to the belief that the source of the neurotoxin was a biological warfare attack. Did Syria use chemical weapons against its own people, including thousands of children? The answer to this question has not yet been definitively answered but the United States has already readied troops to intervene if indeed this was a violation of the international humanitarian law. WARNING: Images are graphic and disturbing Read the announcement published by Doctors Without Borders. Featured image is a screen shot from the video...

Death’s Design

Ajay Verma talks about the inevitability of human death. He speculates that death is built into us. He goes on to suggest that we carry a biologic blueprint for death that may include “grim reaper” mechanisms. Filmed at FutureMed, in February, 2012, at Singularity University.     Featured image from...

“Memory Hacks” Part I: The Baker/baker Paradox

What can medical education take away from a USA Memory Champion?! In 2006, Joshua Foer won the USA Memory Championships by, among other things, memorizing the order of a 52 card deck in a staggering 1 minute and 40 seconds. Other events in the competition included remembering the most names of strangers and reciting the most lines of poetry. Perhaps more astounding is that Foer had been covering the event as a journalist in 2005 and, in just one year, had trained himself to the level of USA champion.  Foer chronicled his incredible journey in a New York Times bestseller, Moonwalking with Einstein, and a famous TED talk watched over 250,000 times. Medical students are often told during the first-week of school that studying will be “like drinking water from a firehose”. Indeed, the pace and volume are certainly ramped up in comparison to college. While a 4-unit class at UC Santa Barbara would cover 30 hours of material over a 10-week period, exams at my medical school typically engrossed 35 hours of lecture crammed into a mere 2 weeks. Breaking down the lectures, I found between 15-20 testable details in each lecture making for 525-700 items to learn for each exam. Tracking the hours I spent studying for an exam showed I was spending about 75 hours in order to memorize up to 700 testable points. The fact...