Should Doctors Get MBAs?

Arlen Meyers, MD, MBA, President and CEO, Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, discusses the benefits of an MBA for physicians. He explains each of the vital 4 C’s offered by MBA programs: 1) Connections 2) Credentials 3) Credibility 4)...

ZDogg MD’s Lethal Dis Rap Exposes Dr. OZ

Every now and then, like most other A-list celebrities, I get recognized in public by strangers. The latest occurrence was in the echo lab in our hospital. A tech, whom I had never seen or met before, asked me what my next video was going to be about. Delighted, I introduced myself formally, puffed out my chest, slicked back my three remaining hairs, and proudly proclaimed that I would be ripping “America’s Doctor” a new one. “That’s right,” I effused. “I’m doing a Doctor Oz dis rap. He’s about to get SERVED! Boo-ya! What WHAT? Whoop, there it is! Oh no he didn’t!” It immediately became so quiet in the room, I swore I could hear the ultrasonic echo waves daintily reflecting off the nearby patient’s calcific mitral annulus. The female technician’s shriek pierced the silence. “What?! Why would you insult a national treasure like Dr. Oz? He’s taller, smarter, better looking, and infinitely more successful than you! Plus he doesn’t come in here EACH DAY, bragging about the ‘off-the-chain’ videos he’s been desperately foisting out on YouTube, only to come back the next day and introduce himself again like he’s never met me. You are a sad little man!” I casually grabbed a couple of day-old bagels and ambled towards the door, tripping over the echo machine power cord along the way. Why dis Dr. Oz, indeed? Let’s enumerate:...

5 Tips for Surviving Gross Anatomy

1. Understand anatomy is a relationship-driven class. The biggest struggle for me to overcome in anatomy was grasping how it differed so much from any class I took in college. Whereas biochemistry, microbiology, and genetics were driven by concepts and pathways, anatomy is based on relationship and positions in space. Successful students understand anatomy is one of the rare classes that exists in three dimensions and gear their studying accordingly. 2. Engage in group review. With study guides, mnemonics, and other study strategies that I would have never thought of, my classmates played a large role in my understanding of anatomy. Two particularly helpful strategies we used in groups were crowd-sourcing large study guides in Google docs and engaging in questions and answer review sessions. 3. Come prepared to lab. Anatomy lab can take up to two-four hours two to three time a week, which represents a good-chunk of time you could be studying on your own. Coming prepared to lab with notes, handouts, or practice questions can help you make the most out of these precious hours rather than standing around and waiting for lab to be over. 4. Experiment with different learning resources. In terms of Anatomy atlases, Netter’s, Thieme’s, and Lipincott’s were the three that provided the best illustrations for studying. Your school’s library should have copies of all three on reserve, and I would recommend experimenting with all three before deciding which one...

You’re Graduating Medical School…But Are You Prepared for Residency?

This morning as I was brushing up on my medical news I came across an article in The New York Times’ Well blog entitled, “Are Med School Grads Prepared to Practice Medicine?” As an entering medical student of the Class of 2018 I was immediately drawn to the piece. Is it possible that I will spend the next 4 years of my life buried in books, engrossed by education, surrounded by patients and established physicians and still not be ready for residency? Oh god… The author of the article, Pauline Chen, M.D., recalls a specific occurrence that took place during her intern year. A fellow intern, who attended a school apparently uninterested in teaching phlebotomy, had spent nearly an hour poking and prodding a patient, attempting to find a vein. The patient, as one can imagine, was not thrilled, yelling, “I’ll hit you if you come near me again!” Another intern was able to help and perform the phlebotomy flawlessly, but admitted to being unprepared to prep a patient for surgery. The problem, thus, is the differential focus of medical schools in educating their students. While one school flawlessly prepares their students on oral presentation of a patient, another emphasizes careful reading of images. The discrepancies are unforgivable and highlight an even more important issue than lack of surgical skill: lack of communication. Instead of working as parts of a seamless and...

Second Traumas: How They Occur & What We Can Do to Prevent Them

I recently attended a conference where the keynote speaker, Dr. Linda Emanuel, discussed trauma, the different treatments and research that has been conducted in Western medicine on behalf of those with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The part that caught my attention was how Emanuel characterized trauma. To paraphrase her words, when people tell you about trauma – a death, a physical assault, the end of a relationship/friendship, a shocking diagnosis, etc. – a second trauma occurs if that revelation is not properly witnessed. I found this idea of second trauma to be powerful because so often, trauma is characterized as a bleeding gunshot wound or deep mental distress, but trauma can be any sudden change in your life that affects you mentally, physically, or spiritually. I began questioning my own experiences and those of friends, family, and peers, especially the women in my life. I recently began volunteering as a rape crisis advocate at a city hospital, so a specific kind of trauma has been on my mind. When I interviewed for the program, I was asked why I wanted to work with sexual assault cases. My answer was simple: to help prevent second trauma. Most of us do not innately know how to deal with difficult situations. We learn along the way, but in that process we can hurt and do damage despite having the best intentions. Women of all...

The 11 Types of Physicians You’ll Encounter (Or Become)

Just because we all are on our path to become a physician, doesn’t mean we are all the same. Yes, we have that nerdy factor holding us together as a group but there really is quite diversity in the medical...

Yes, the Neuralyzer Could Be Real in the Not So Distant Future

A new article in The New York Times discusses the journey of Dr. Karl Deisseroth, the world’s leading researcher on optogenetics, a field which continues to push the boundaries of neurology and psychiatry: Neuroscientists have long been frustrated by their inability to study how the brain works in sufficiently precise detail. Unexpectedly, a solution has emerged from basic, genetic research on microorganisms that rely on light-responsive “opsin” proteins to survive. By inserting opsin genes into the cells of the brain, scientists can now use flashes of light to trigger firing by specific neurons on command. This technology, optogenetics, permits researchers to conduct extremely precise, cell type-targeted experiments in the brains of living, freely moving animals–which electrodes and other traditional methods do not allow. Although optogenetics is still in its infancy, it is already yielding potentially useful insights into the neuroscience underlying some psychiatric conditions. Read a more in-depth report from Scientific...

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