Lab Mice Might Become A Thing Of The Past

Scientists at École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) have developed a small laboratory-in-a-box capable of housing and feeding a colony of C. elegans nematodes (roundworms) and testing the effects of cosmetics, drugs, and other substances to determine their toxicity to living organisms in an automated, easy-to-manage process. EPFL helped create Nagi Bioscience, the company commercializing the technology, which has already placed functioning prototypes in notable labs around Europe. Click here to learn more about this laboratory innovation from EPFL News. Syndicated from The Doctor’s Channel. More on Mice on AlmostDocs.com: Helping Mice Mate: 3D Printing Ovarian Envelopes: Northwestern University researchers have tested various 3d printing techniques to discover the angles at which ovarian follicles will optimally interact with their scaffolds to increase ovary survival. 30º and 60º angles apparently provide better protection and vascularization than 90º angles. The results have been harnessed to create a prosthetic implant that is meant to help restore fertility. Sterile mice implanted with these new follicle-infused scaffolds were able to reproduce through natural mating processes. Nobel Prize Winning Scientist Recreates “Inception” in Mice: Susumu Tonegawa, the 1987 Nobel Prize winner in Physiology or Medicine, and his team of neuroscientists at MIT have published compelling evidence suggesting that it is possible to access the memory axis and induce false memories in a mouse model. Tonegawa’s findings pose interesting and thought provoking questions to not only the scientific community but also the political, legal and social communities. One is forced to...

Why Presentation Skills Will Help You As A Doctor

I recently worked on a group presentation with some of my classmates on treatment planning. We were given the patient’s chart and asked to come up with the best treatment for their condition and present the case to faculty member who would ask each presenter a different question on our treatment. When we did a presentation run through, everyone read directly off the slides. For students with no exposure to public speaking and presentation skills, it is no surprise that they would do this. We sit through hours of lectures where professors read off slides that sometimes aren’t their own. In college, as a pre-medical student, you may get away with awkward pauses and statements filled with hesitation (you know, those um’s and like’s in the middle of a sentence). In a professional school program, such as medical school, it is inexcusable not to have basic presentation skills. I came up with a few suggestions for students interested in practicing speaking in public: 1. Look for opportunities to become a leader in your school in clubs 2. Raise your hand in class and ask questions 3. Take electives in your respective program or academic opportunities to write or speak in public 4. Learn by observing Ted Talks or YouTube videos 5. Participate in Toast Masters sessions 6. Look for Improv groups or clubs Why is this important? As doctors,...

Are Older Doctors Worse Than Younger Ones?

If you’re a patient, would you trust older doctors, or younger ones? Perhaps you’d pick an older one because you think they’re more seasoned and knowledgeable. Or, maybe you’d choose a younger one because you think they’re more up to date with modern treatments. Deciding between doctors can be tricky, but a recent BMJ study has elucidated a key difference in performance between younger and older doctors. The study—led by Dr. Anupam Jena of Harvard Medical School—took a random sample of Medicare data for more than 700,000 hospital admissions from 2011 to 2014, and found that doctors age 50 and above have higher patient mortality rates than doctors under age 50. The results are summarized in the table below: Doctor age range Patient mortality rate 40 and under 10.8% 40-49 11.1% 50-59 11.3% 60 and above 12.1% The differences are small, but they’re meaningful. The study controlled for a number of factors, including the possibility that the sickest patients were assigned to older physicians on any given day. Jena suggests that older doctors have worse outcomes because they’re less up to date with the newest medical technologies. “There’s a fear that as doctors get further away from residency, they might be out of touch with new technologies and treatments,” Jena told STAT news. Studies support Jena’s claim—a study in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that over half of...

Everything You Should Know About The Endocrine System

We live in a period where many people are steadily and consciously working towards leaving a healthy lifestyle. Some desire to gain weight but many would love to lose a few pounds here and there. You are probably exercising daily and sticking to a diet. However, you realise that though you are doing everything right; you aren’t getting the desired effects. Well, the problem could not be in the program but your body. If you are looking for professional endocrinology residency writing online, it’s safe to assume that you understand the basics of the endocrine system. However, just a refresher, what is the endocrine system? Basics of the Endocrine System The human body is made up of various systems. To help you cope with stresses and multiple events, the endocrine, immune and nervous system work together. Several glands located throughout your body, make up the endocrine system. The hormones secreted by these glands regulate different activities of the body. It includes your metabolism, reproduction, sexual function, to mood. Produced and secreted by the organs, the hormones disperse throughout one’s body through the circulatory system. In your personal statement internal medicine, you should know that these hormones work on tissues, cells and organs that are far from the gland that produces the hormone. The glands within this system can be categorised into two: Exocrine Glands: they secrete their hormones into...

Medical School Debt: The Ghost Slowly Killing Medicine

It’s time for more medical schools to follow New York University’s lead and finally address a widespread issue that has left the future of medicine—especially that of lower-paying specialties such as family medicine and psychiatry— in an unstable position. Healthcare professionals, especially doctors, are and always will be a necessity across the globe. Sickness and disease will never cease; it’s part of the human condition. As known illnesses are cured, new diseases will be discovered. Despite the guaranteed stability of the medical profession, more and more aspiring doctors are pursuing other careers. It’s not difficult to see why. Dr. Farzon A. Nahvi, an emergency medicine physician in New York City, shared his personal experiences with the world this week in The New York Times. It’s hard to ignore your passion and sense of purpose no matter how difficult the road ahead may appear. If it is what fuels your soul, it will be accomplished by whatever means—unless unremitting student debt is threatening your wellbeing. Dr. Nahvi was motivated to practice medicine by his childhood, growing up in a working-class family. He thought that being a physician would surely provide him with a life where he’d be more than comfortable financially. Never did he foresee still being in drastic debt more than five years after graduating from medical school. Unfortunately, this is the norm these days. Aspiring doctors not only...

Seven Necessary Tips for Your Third Year in Medical School

How do you do well on during your third year in medical school and on your clinical rotations? What are tips for the third year of med school that you can use? In this post, I’m going to give you my top 7 tips which have helped me achieve honors in almost all my rotations and honors on over 90% of my evaluations. If you prefer a video format, then check out this Youtube video and consider subscribing to the channel for weekly content! Also, I’ve created for you a free step-by-step guide on how to plan out your study plan for a rotation.  This will help you decide how to schedule your practice questions, book chapters, and practice exams to do well on your shelf exams! It also includes a sample monthly study calendar! 1. Stop Worrying About Your Grades, Instead Work About Your Progress This is the biggest tip and the one I feel most medical students fall short on during their third year of med school. If you haven’t learned already – you will soon – but grading for the third year of med school can be very subjective. Often the things we care about the most (i.e. good evaluations from our attendings) are out of our control. But we spend the most time worrying about creating a good impression. No! Instead, let’s do a 180 and become impressive to...

August is for ALS

You’ve probably heard of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease, from the Ice Bucket Challenge that blew up the Internet about four years ago. I was one of the tens of thousands nationwide who took the icy plunge to raise awareness for this debilitating condition that effects 5-7 per 100,000 people in the US. Who would’ve known a couple years later I would be working in a laboratory to find an effective treatment or better yet, a cure. As August is ALS awareness month, I thought I’d recount my experience and share what I learned. I’d also like to dedicate this article to my best friend’s grandmother who was recently diagnosed with ALS as well as her grandfather who has Alzheimer’s disease. During my final year at Georgetown University, I interned at the Laboratory for Dementia and Parkinsonism where I delved into the pathology of ALS as well as dementia. One of the very first interesting tidbits I learned is that ALS, a motor neuron disease (MND), is now thought to be on a spectrum of the same disorder as frontotemporal dementia (FTD). More specifically, ALS is a disease of the upper and lower motor neurons that eventually leads to loss of voluntary movement, paralysis, and respiratory failure; yet, some ALS patients present with behavioral and cognitive impairment that is commonly seen in dementia....