yash-pandya

Yash Pandya

Yash Pandya is a science writer at The "Almost" Doctor's Channel. He is a rising third-year student at the University of Pittsburgh, majoring in Emergency Medicine with minors in Neuroscience and Chemistry. Yash plans on attending the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in Fall 2016 with guaranteed admission. In addition to the usual humdrum of academic involvement, Yash loves to play Ping Pong, catch up on the latest "Big Bang Theory," and travel. Having lived in India for half his lifetime, Yash aspires to expand his horizons into international healthcare by practicing medicine globally.

Healthcare Around The World #7: China

How does healthcare work in China? As shown in the video below, the Chinese healthcare system as reported several years ago was marked by many flaws, including a government-sponsored plan with high out-of-pocket costs, more care given than needed to increase charges, and undertrained providers. Currently, the Chinese government is devoting greater focus to shore up its dysfunctional healthcare system in order to make it more effective as well as more affordable for its citizens.     To at least some degree, we are all aware of the dynamics around healthcare in the United States, centering around the struggles to make services affordable, ensuring equal access to care, and juggling the politics of party-line views between private and federally-sponsored healthcare (with everything along the middle of that spectrum). But how do other countries around the world offer healthcare to its people? Can their models provide us with some insight into how to modify our system to make it better?   Over the course of the next several articles, we will be viewing some interesting clips on the general model of healthcare in select countries across the globe. While this sampling is in no way representative of all possible models out there, it undoubtedly provides us with intriguing information to ponder.   Also, a disclaimer before we start. Some of the videos may be presenting biased opinions about the superiority...

10 Moments That Will (Re)Fuel Your Passion For Medicine #1-5

So here’s the deal. Contrary to my initial belief, I am actually turning into a Grey’s Anatomy fan. And I’m not talking about the ginormous book (that is way to heavy to carry, much less read), but the popular TV series on the life of surgeons. Watching these clips always revives my passion for medicine, just when I think I’m in over my head.   Going into the medical field myself, I have several reasons and motives that keep me going everyday, despite of all the struggles. From my love for the field to my desire for helping people, I have much to go on. However, there are always those moments where you seek some form of external boost or reprise that can reinvigorate you to reach new heights in achieving your dream. You start to think that you want to be more than a physician – you want to be a person who can be looked up to as a figure of passionate purpose. And what better way to spice up your motives than some TV drama?   So, I would like you all to take a close look at some classic, memorable moments from Grey’s Anatomy. Beyond their superficial appeal, there is a deeper message that transcends into the very roots of medicine and medical practice, hitting on the finer aspects that may go unrecognized without some...

Healthcare Around The World #6: India

According to the India Brand Equity Foundation, “India has emerged as the fastest growing major economy in the world” and its population has followed, becoming the second most populated country as of 2016. However, its healthcare system is not keeping up with the huge growth in recent years, as many people find it difficult to get access to care. How can a healthcare system accommodate such a rapidly growing population affordably and effectively?     To at least some degree, we are all aware of the dynamics around healthcare in the United States, centering around the struggles to make services affordable, ensuring equal access to care, and juggling the politics of party-line views between private and federally-sponsored healthcare (with everything along the middle of that spectrum). But how do other countries around the world offer healthcare to its people? Can their models provide us with some insight into how to modify our system to make it better?   Over the course of the next several articles, we will be viewing some interesting clips on the general model of healthcare in select countries across the globe. While this sampling is in no way representative of all possible models out there, it undoubtedly provides us with intriguing information to ponder.   Also, a disclaimer before we start. Some of the videos may be presenting biased opinions about the superiority of certain healthcare systems. My intention...

Healthcare Around The World #5: New Zealand

New Zealand is a country that is not as common in daily conversation as the countries we have looked at so far. However its healthcare system is not something that should be overlooked. This educational video notes some of the major differences between New Zealand’s and the United States’ healthcare systems.     To at least some degree, we are all aware of the dynamics around healthcare in the United States, centering around the struggles to make services affordable, ensuring equal access to care, and juggling the politics of party-line views between private and federally-sponsored healthcare (with everything along the middle of that spectrum). But how do other countries around the world offer healthcare to its people? Can their models provide us with some insight into how to modify our system to make it better?   Over the course of the next several articles, we will be viewing some interesting clips on the general model of healthcare in select countries across the globe. While this sampling is in no way representative of all possible models out there, it undoubtedly provides us with intriguing information to ponder.   Also, a disclaimer before we start. Some of the videos may be presenting biased opinions about the superiority of certain healthcare systems. My intention is to simply deliver the information without advocating for any particular viewpoint.   5. New Zealand As shown...

Healthcare Around The World #4: England

  To at least some degree, we are all aware of the dynamics around healthcare in the United States, centering around the struggles to make services affordable, ensuring equal access to care, and juggling the politics of party-line views between private and federally-sponsored healthcare (with everything along the middle of that spectrum). But how do other countries around the world offer healthcare to its people? Can their models provide us with some insight into how to modify our system to make it better?   Over the course of the next several articles, we will be viewing some interesting clips on the general model of healthcare in select countries across the globe. While this sampling is in no way representative of all possible models out there, it undoubtedly provides us with intriguing information to ponder.   Also, a disclaimer before we start. Some of the videos may be presenting biased opinions about the superiority of certain healthcare systems. My intention is to simply deliver the information without advocating for any particular viewpoint.   4. England England is one of the primary examples of government-sponsored healthcare for its citizens. Sponsoring almost all services for patients with little to no charges incurred, it still outranks the United States in terms of a lower portion of its GDP comprising healthcare expenditures and producing better outcomes. However, there are some downsides that are worth...

Healthcare Around The World #3: France

If you didn’t know, we can actually learn a lot from France’s healthcare system. From the video below, it is clear that although expensive, France may have one of the best healthcare systems in the world. Watch and see for yourself or click here to read more.   To at least some degree, we are all aware of the dynamics around healthcare in the United States, centering around the struggles to make services affordable, ensuring equal access to care, and juggling the politics of party-line views between private and federally-sponsored healthcare (with everything along the middle of that spectrum). But how do other countries around the world offer healthcare to its people? Can their models provide us with some insight into how to modify our system to make it better?   Over the course of the next several articles, we will be viewing some interesting clips on the general model of healthcare in select countries across the globe. While this sampling is in no way representative of all possible models out there, it undoubtedly provides us with intriguing information to ponder.   Also, a disclaimer before we start. Some of the videos may be presenting biased opinions about the superiority of certain healthcare systems. My intention is to simply deliver the information without advocating for any particular viewpoint.   3. France   Similar to our discussion in the article on...

3 Pearls For Medical School

It’s been 13 days since the start of my medical career. I had been dreaming of this time for as long as I can remember, yearning to finally join the ranks of the coveted few in medicine. Excitement and anxiety were the two overriding emotions as I finally began my journey as a first year medical student.     For those premedical students out there who are in the same position that I was in a year ago, in the middle of applications and interviews, this is my way of letting you in on the life of a medical student. I want to share some of the most notable pearls of insight on what it means to be a medical student and why it’s probably going to be the best time of your life.   1. Keep up! Yes, all those analogies that you have heard about medical school are true. It really is like drinking water from a giant firehose or eating an inordinate amount of food everyday for four years without break. However, as you probably know, a great majority of medical students have successfully passed the trials and gone on to become excellent physicians.   So, I am here to tell you that it is doable. But without underscoring the difficulty, it is crucial that you keep up. While you may have passed through undergrad by...