yash-pandya

Yash Pandya

Yash Pandya is a science writer at The "Almost" Doctor's Channel. He is a rising third-year student at the University of Pittsburgh, majoring in Emergency Medicine with minors in Neuroscience and Chemistry. Yash plans on attending the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in Fall 2016 with guaranteed admission. In addition to the usual humdrum of academic involvement, Yash loves to play Ping Pong, catch up on the latest "Big Bang Theory," and travel. Having lived in India for half his lifetime, Yash aspires to expand his horizons into international healthcare by practicing medicine globally.

Healthcare Around The World #9: Ethiopia

Transitioning from countries such as the United States, England, and France, developing countries such as Ethiopia carry a whole new set of challenges. The conversation shifts from long-term sustainability to establishing a system that can have the right resources and allow people equal access. Considering the relatively low standard of living across of country, Ethiopians require care that is highly affordable. As shown in this video, several steps need to be taken in order to even start to overcome the struggle against healthcare challenges.     To at least some degree, we are all aware of the dynamics around healthcare in the United States, centering around the struggles to make services affordable, ensuring equal access to care, and juggling the politics of party-line views between private and federally-sponsored healthcare (with everything along the middle of that spectrum). But how do other countries around the world offer healthcare to its people? Can their models provide us with some insight into how to modify our system to make it better?   Over the course of the next several articles, we will be viewing some interesting clips on the general model of healthcare in select countries across the globe. While this sampling is in no way representative of all possible models out there, it undoubtedly provides us with intriguing information to ponder.   Also, a disclaimer before we start. Some of the...

Issues Medical Students Should Be Aware Of #3: Death

Though it is a topic that no one wants to address, death is an inevitable part of life, and it will affect all of us at one point or another. As hard as it is to face in our personal lives, we will also need to come face to face with death in our professional lives as we prepare for a life in the medical field.   If you are a medical student who has gone through clinical rotations, you might likely have had this experience (especially on the surgical floors). If you are just starting medical school, it’s something to look forward to!   With this pleasant perspective in mind, I want to actually talk about some of the key issues that you can (and likely should) be aware of as a prospective or current medical student. Beyond the technical medical knowledge, I want to vouch for the crucial importance of being aware of controversial topics that come up repeatedly and consistently in the medical field. As someone who will be holding the mantle as the future of medicine, medical students should be cognizant of current controversies that are garnering attention, forcing us future physicians to take a stand as the appointed leaders.   Over the course of the next several articles, I will be presenting unique perspectives delivered by experts on intriguing medical issues. And to make...

So, How About That Anatomy Exam?

Continuing on in my journey from the first week of medical school orientation to finally having completed my very first anatomy exam, I have come a long way (in a short amount of time). The last 3 weeks were quite a wild ride. I went from a carefree undergraduate student who used to procrastinate 2 days before exams to a diligent and organized learner trying to understand and retain all the material without being overwhelmed.     For those of you yet unexposed to the wondrous volume of information in medical anatomy, let me tell you this – it’s a lot. And I can guess that many of you are probably saying “I can handle it,” which is what I thought as well, until I cracked open my syllabus and Netter’s along with a variety of other books (just enough to avoid feeling resource guilty) in preparation for the big exam.   So, having gone through the experience, I am here to share my reflections on the first few weeks of medical anatomy and how it can change a student, inducting one into the profession of medicine and developing a frame of mind for even more information to come.   1. Pre-Read, Post-Read, and Re-Read Unless you have a Master’s Degree in anatomy, this is new stuff for everyone. Your whole class is on the same playing field, encountering...

Healthcare Around The World #8: Norway

Second only to the United States, Norway spends the most per person on healthcare. Given its government-sponsored system resulting from high taxation coupled with long waiting times, the country has grappled with the issues with moderate success. However, the question again arises as with New Zealand: What if we were to try a government-sponsored system for a country as large as the United States?     To at least some degree, we are all aware of the dynamics around healthcare in the United States, centering around the struggles to make services affordable, ensuring equal access to care, and juggling the politics of party-line views between private and federally-sponsored healthcare (with everything along the middle of that spectrum). But how do other countries around the world offer healthcare to its people? Can their models provide us with some insight into how to modify our system to make it better?   Over the course of the next several articles, we will be viewing some interesting clips on the general model of healthcare in select countries across the globe. While this sampling is in no way representative of all possible models out there, it undoubtedly provides us with intriguing information to ponder.   Also, a disclaimer before we start. Some of the videos may be presenting biased opinions about the superiority of certain healthcare systems. My intention is to simply deliver the...

Popular Alternative Medical Therapies #7: Tai Chi

Tai Chi is one of the most touted practices in alternative medicine. Purported to improve overall blood flow in the body and raise serotonin levels (as stated in this video), the technique may prove to be beneficial for millions of people around the world who suffer from cardiovascular conditions, mental health disorders, and various others.     Most people know about medicine as viewed through the lens of biomedicine, drug therapies, evidence-based treatments, and the like. However, there is a whole another area of study that addresses ailments with a quite different approach. We have all likely heard of it as alternative medicine.   There are many reasons to take an interest in this field. However, for us prospective as well as current clinicians, this field holds particular value as a future prospective approach that could likely be incorporated into common practice. Despite of our most cutting edge tools in today’s day and age, we are nowhere close to curing the wide variety of diseases in existence. This is where alternative medical therapies offer a different look at problems and open up a new playing field to develop a holistic approach that can benefit patients.   So, in an effort to make us all more informed, I will be going over some of the most common as well as interesting alternative medical approaches. Hopefully we can all learn something...

Issues Medical Students Should Be Aware Of #2: Opioid Epidemic

  If you are a medical student who has gone through clinical rotations, you might likely have had this experience (especially on the surgical floors). If you are just starting medical school, it’s something to look forward to!   With this pleasant perspective in mind, I want to actually talk about some of the key issues that you can (and likely should) be aware of as a prospective or current medical student. Beyond the technical medical knowledge, I want to vouch for the crucial importance of being aware of controversial topics that come up repeatedly and consistently in the medical field. As someone who will be holding the mantle as the future of medicine, medical students should be cognizant of current controversies that are garnering attention, forcing us future physicians to take a stand as the appointed leaders.   Over the course of the next several articles, I will be presenting unique perspectives delivered by experts on intriguing medical issues. And to make it even more interesting, they will be TED Talks! My only advice: Take some time to think hard about these topics. Who knows, you might just end up being a leading authority one day!   2. Opioid Epidemic Claiming nearly 30,000 American lives every year, the opioid epidemic is one of the most critical issues today. As medical students and future physicians, this is a particularly...

Healthcare Around The World #7: China

How does healthcare work in China? As shown in the video below, the Chinese healthcare system as reported several years ago was marked by many flaws, including a government-sponsored plan with high out-of-pocket costs, more care given than needed to increase charges, and undertrained providers. Currently, the Chinese government is devoting greater focus to shore up its dysfunctional healthcare system in order to make it more effective as well as more affordable for its citizens.     To at least some degree, we are all aware of the dynamics around healthcare in the United States, centering around the struggles to make services affordable, ensuring equal access to care, and juggling the politics of party-line views between private and federally-sponsored healthcare (with everything along the middle of that spectrum). But how do other countries around the world offer healthcare to its people? Can their models provide us with some insight into how to modify our system to make it better?   Over the course of the next several articles, we will be viewing some interesting clips on the general model of healthcare in select countries across the globe. While this sampling is in no way representative of all possible models out there, it undoubtedly provides us with intriguing information to ponder.   Also, a disclaimer before we start. Some of the videos may be presenting biased opinions about the superiority...