the-health-scout

The Health Scout, "Almost" MD

Dalya Munves (The Health Scout) is a 2nd year, non-traditional medical student at the University of Texas at Houston who is passionate about improving medical education, healthcare quality, and health literacy. Before medical school, she earned a BA in Literary Studies with a minor in Philosophy and worked at a healthcare consulting company for over 2 years. When she's not studying, she's generally reading, drawing cartoons, blogging, or tweeting.

http://www.thehealthscout.blogspot.com

What’s In My White Coat: Surgery Edition

________________________________________ From top left: 1. ID and scrub card: It’s always a good idea to have a pair of clean scrubs available. 2. Scalpel: For emergency airways. (Seriously, you should always have one with you. At the very least, you can hand it to someone who knows what to do.) 3. Dr. Pestana’s Surgery: This should actually be in your scrubs so that you can read it during downtime (in pre-op, for example). 4. Stethoscope: You need to evaluate bowel sounds for post-op checks. 5. Xeroform gauze 6. Lube: Because every GI bleed and acute abdomen requires a DRE. (You’ve heard this joke, right? Q: When is it okay for the medical student to skip the DRE? A: When they don’t have any fingers.) 7. Scissors 8. Phone charger: So you can charge up while you’re scrubbed in. 9. Tape 10. Forceps: Useful for removing packing. (Make sure to discard or clean after each use.) 11. Lunch! 12. Highlighter and pens 13. Gum: For post-call morning...

Fun With Rounding

Lately I’ve been joking with my classmates about rounds. It’s really interesting how well rounds match the personalities of the people in that specialty. Internal Medicine rounds are notoriously long, mostly because each patient has a tremendously complicated medical history and multiple possible etiologies for their chief complaint. But most of the people on the Medicine team are just waiting to subspecialize, and each of the subspecialties have their own unique rounding style. Rheumatologists don’t mind discussing antibodies all day. Nephrologists are all geniuses who can evaluate weeks of labs in a few seconds. Neurologists are extremely cerebral (pun intended) and can discuss a single image or lab at length. Stroke rounds were by far the longest rounds I’ve ever experienced. One day we just didn’t finish rounding. It got to be 5 PM and the residents had to put in orders before checking out to the night float, so we didn’t see the last few patients as a team. That was interesting… And then Surgery… Ah, Surgery rounds, the very best of all rounds. (Since I last posted I’ve decided to apply to general surgery, but that’s another topic for another day.) Surgery rounds are just like surgeons: fast, accurate, and efficient. On Pediatric Surgery we rounded on roughly 40 patients in less than an hour and a half, and not a single detail was overlooked. It was...

Contents of a Medical Student’s Refrigerator

If you love food and you are having trouble remembering the nitty-gritty details of those disease states, just picture what a medical student’s refrigerator would look like! You’ll never forget “maple syrup urine syndrome” after you pour that syrup over your morning pancakes…or at least you hope it’s...

Functional Anatomy of a the Student’s Brain

The many things on a med student’s...

How Med Students Envision Match Day

Congratulations! All of your hard work over the past 4 years has finally paid off! And you only have at least 3 more years until you are actually an attending and don’t have to give your seat up for a doctor’s pocketbook! So in honor of match day we take a look at how future specialists feel when receiving those previous white...

The 4 Professors You’ll Have in Med School…In Pictures

Professors are…interesting. They are (or should be) ultimately there to convey the necessary information but sometimes their own agenda gets in the way! Have you encountered these professors? Leave a comment and tell us about your favorite/favorite-to-immitate professor! 1. The one who seems to have forgotten the competitive process of getting into medical school.   2. The one who seems to forget the confines of human memory.     3. The one who can’t differentiate between “What you need to know for Step I” and “What you need to know when you’re a practicing physician.”   4. The one who seems to be...

A Day in the Life of a Med Student

A descriptive and mathematically accurate depiction of my happiness (or unhappiness) throughout my day in med school. Another graph needed to depict happiness on vacation as well as unhappiness leading up to...

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