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The Doctor's Channel

Take a bite from the adults' table. The Doctor’s Channel is the world’s leading video site for physicians. Get the latest news in clinical medicine, disease resource centers, CME programs, and Doc Life, all in under 3 mins or less.

http://www.thedoctorschannel.com

Infographic: Future Pandemics

Featured From Gap Medics Blog   As predictions go, pandemics are one of the scariest. Inevitable and with a huge unknown quantity, pandemics are something that even the World Health Organisation are urging people not to ignore, with the frightening forecast that there will be, “sometime in the future, an event that will kill…somewhere between 80 and 90 million people.”   There are lots of hypothetical situations and theories about where a virus will come from, what it will do and the devastation it will have. In fact, there are already scientists working on vaccines that the human population may need in the event of a global outbreak. There’s actually a World Health Organisation Global Vaccine Plan!   In this infographic, we take a look at some of the possible pandemics of the future and how you can best prepare yourself against the spread of germs....

Major Advancements in Brain-to-Computer Interface for Paralyzed Individuals

Featured From The Doctor’s Channel   Video: Source   Over the last two and a half years, Stanford University researchers have been developing and improving a brain-computer interface (BCI) that allows paralyzed individuals to input data into a computer using only their brainwaves (via implant). Recently, one patient with a spinal cord injury, and two patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease) have been able to enter up to 39 characters per minute (translating to about 8 words per minute) using the technology.   Krishna Shenoy, PhD, one of the senior co-authors of the paper published in eLife, says “This study reports the highest speed and accuracy, by a factor of three, over what’s been shown before.” Dr. Shenoy has been working on BCI development since the early 2000s and has spent the last two years working on this project with Chethan Pandarinath, PhD, and postdoctoral scholar Paul Nuyujukian, MD, PhD. “These high-performing BCI algorithms’ use in human clinical trials demonstrates the potential for this class of technology to restore communication to people with paralysis,” according to Nuyujukian.   It is important to note that this “typing” performance was achieved without any kind of autocorrection software.   Click here to read the quoted article published in Stanford Medicine‘s News Center.   Featured Image:...

Would You Google a Patient?

With social media permeating our lives, the lines between professional life and personal life often become blurred. Going on a first date? A quick Google search can give you a glimpse into your date’s life and potential conversation topics. Taking a class with a new professor? Google will give you a heads-up as to his or her professional interests or recent publications. Have an appointment for a check-up with a new doctor? Many websites will give you patient reviews and ratings of the practice.   …But what if your doctor is Googling you right back?     Researchers have had the better part of two decades to figure out if doctors could use social media to the benefit of their patients, but there still seems to be a wary skepticism among med school students and practicing physicians of all ages that prevents investigation of potential benefits. After all, knowledge is power, but it often comes with an ethical dilemma.   Research from James Brown et al at the University of Sydney found that 1 in 5 doctors surveyed had received a “friend request” from a patient. A similar survey from Bosslet et al found that 93.5% of medical students surveyed used social media in their everyday lives, but it was practicing physicians who were more likely to have looked up the profile of a patient or patient’s family members...

Quiz: Medical Instrument or Torture Device?

Featured From Gap Medics US   QUIZ – Medical Instrument or Torture Device?     Featured Image:...

Influential Women in Medicine: Gertrude B. Elion

Although she never obtained an M.D. or a formal Ph.D., Gertrude Belle Elion’s influence on medicine is indisputable. A biochemist and pharmacologist, her work paved the way for breakthroughs in cancer and leukemia medication that would save thousands of lives.   Image: Source   Elion was born in New York in 1918 to Polish and Lithuanian immigrant parents. When she was 15, her grandfather died from cancer, which gave her the drive to want to cure diseases. In 1937, at age 19, she graduated from Hunter College with an undergrad degree in chemistry. Although she applied for fifteen graduate school fellowships, she was rejected from all of them.   Eventually she landed a position as a chemistry lab assistant. After saving some money from this position, Elion enrolled in grad school at New York University and was the only woman in her class. She worked during the day as a substitute teacher and studied at night, earning an MSc in chemistry in 1941.   After holding a few laboratory jobs that didn’t really fuel her interests, Elion was offered an assistant position by George Hitchings at Burroughs-Wellcome (later GlaxoSmithKline). Elion was excited by the opportunities to use her knowledge, not only in chemistry, but also biochemistry, pharmacology, immunology and virology. While working on antagonists of nucleic acid building blocks by day, she commuted to night school to earn her...

The Language of Transplanted Organs

Researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre have discovered a cellular structure that could potentially revolutionize organ transplantation. Mélanie Dieudé, PhD, and Marie-Josée Hébert, MD, identified apoptotic exosome-like vesicles, which, when injected into mice, stimulate autoantibody production and increase the risk of graft rejection after transplantation. They also identified a novel concept: The transplanted organ “talks” to the immune system. As Dr. Hébert explains, “It’s not only the immune system of the recipient of the organ that sees the organ as foreign, the organ shouts to the immune system ‘I may be detrimental to you.’ This starts a feud between the immune system and the recipient.” This feud may end in rejection of the graft.   Video: Source   How to interrupt this feud? Dr. Dieudé and Dr. Hébert have identified a way to block the enzyme activity of apoptotic exosome-like vesicles through the administration of bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor currently approved for the treatment of certain bone marrow cancers. Results are preliminary and phase 3 trials are underway, but this research suggests new ways to anticipate and control organ rejection after transplantation. Click here to review the article published in Science Translational Magazine.   Featured From The Doctor’s Channel   Featured Image:...

OTC Painkillers: How Dangerous Are They?

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications or “NSAIDs” are sold over the counter in grocery stores, gas stations and pharmacies, even though research has long shown that they can be dangerous for people with kidney disease, heart failure or high blood pressure. NSAIDs can also produce adverse reactions when they interact with other medications, both prescription and non-prescription, including antidepressants, antihypertensives, alcohol or aspirin.   However, two new studies, one from BMJ and the other from the European Heart Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy have shown again that NSAIDs may be associated with increased risk of heart failure and cardiac arrest. In BMJ, Arfe et all utilized healthcare databases from four European countries to find adults who began NSAID treatment between 2000-2010. The authors found that the use of any NSAID was associated with a 19% increase of risk of hospital admission for heart failure, with some variation for the type of NSAID and the dosage.   Image: Source   Sondergaard et al utilized the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry to identify patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and identified patients who had used an NSAID within the 30 days before their cardiac arrest. They found that ibuprofen and diclofenac were associated with a significantly increased risk of cardiac arrest.   Image: Source   This new evidence, along with other studies that have shown the potential for gastric damage and impaired ability to recover after...