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The Doctor's Channel

Take a bite from the adults' table. The Doctor’s Channel is the world’s leading video site for physicians. Get the latest news in clinical medicine, disease resource centers, CME programs, and Doc Life, all in under 3 mins or less.

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It’s Not All About Mardi Gras…

Tulane medical students help with the tornado recovery, which is still an ongoing effort. Though Mardi Gras is an extremely important part of New Orleans culture, that’s not all they’re doing down south! Tulane medical students help with tornado recovery from Tulane University on Vimeo.   Featured Image:...

Scalp Cooling Therapy to Minimize Hair Loss From Chemo

Video: Source   Scalp cooling using a cap device worn during chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer can reduce chemotherapy-induced alopecia by at least 50%, according to 2 separate studies published in JAMA Oncology. Scalp cooling induces vasoconstriction, which reduces both blood flow to the scalp and the amount of chemotherapy delivered to hair follicles, thus reducing hair loss. Scalp cooling is usually carried out for 30 minutes before, during, and for 90-120 minutes after each chemotherapy infusion. Scalp-cooling devices have been used in Europe for decades, but concerns about metastases have slowed their acceptance in the United States.   The Scalp Cooling Alopecia Prevention (SCALP) trial used the Orbis Paxman Hair Loss Prevention System, which is awaiting approval in the United States. Julie Nangia, MD, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, and colleagues conducted the randomized trial, which enrolled 182 women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant anthracycline- or taxane-based chemotherapy. At the end of 4 cycles of chemotherapy, the planned interim analysis showed that 50.5% of patients who received scalp cooling retained their hair, compared with 0% of patients in the control group.   The second study used the DigniCap device, which was approved in the U.S. in 2015. Hope S. Rugo, MD, University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues conducted the prospective cohort study in which 106 women with breast cancer used the cap device and 16 women...

Video Game Therapy

It’s crazy to think that almost 91% of kids in the U.S. play video games, but today video games are an important part of our culture and lifestyle. Shared gaming experiences like Pokémon Go bring together people from all around the globe. Game developers work hard to make their games appealing and accessible to as broad an audience as possible, but what about kids with a medical condition that prevents them from playing most games? And what if accessible games could include a learning and therapeutic component?   Researchers at Flinders University in Adelaide are working on video games specifically for children with cerebral palsy and limited hand function. Cerebral palsy affects more than 17 million people around the world. There is no cure for CP and it is the most common childhood disability. Targeted interventions for children often involve therapeutic exercises aimed at improving or maintaining function with the goal of helping children achieve independence in daily activities. However, just as with adult physical therapy, compliance can be a struggle as the exercises are seen as work and not play. David Hobbs and his team set out to change that by making an accessible video game system that may also help children with CP improve sensory function, bilateral hand functionality and coordination.   Image: Source   Known as “serious games,” their work is part of a growing sector...

Fighting Allergies Without Injections?

Where I live in Texas it’s cedar season, which means it’s allergy season. Texas is notorious for its large number of pollen-producing plants including ash, mountain cedar, ragweed, grass and oak… the list goes on and on. When pollination comes around each year, it seems like everyone is coughing, sneezing and congested, with an itchy throat and watery eyes.   Image: Source   To cope with allergies, I’ve heard some pretty creative (though NOT doctor recommended nor evidence-based) solutions including sleeping with a wet washcloth over the face, eating “local” honey to expose the body to pollens or drinking apple cider vinegar. With my friends going to such extremes to fight allergies, you can imagine how excited I was to see a new paper in JAMA reporting on a 3-year study of sublingual immunotherapy for grass pollen allergy sufferers.   Image: Source   Sublingual immunotherapy is being explored as an alternative to injection therapies (or subcutaneous immunotherapy), where small amounts of allergens are injected into patients over the course of months and years to build immunity and prevent the allergic reaction. Allergy shots have been used for nearly 100 years and evidence shows that they are highly effective, especially against many pollen species. It is also more cost-effective than simply treating allergic symptoms. With sublingual immunotherapy, instead of injections, the patient takes either a drop solution or tablet under...

Want To Take A Virtual Tour Of The Human Body?

Imagine having the ability to take a virtual tour of the human body. One company is making it happen. Though the software is only available to healthcare companies for now, this technology could eventually be used in medical schools, completely changing the way students learn.   Video: Source   BioLucid, a digital health company, has introduced You®, a virtual reality (VR) software platform that takes physicians, students, and patients on an interactive tour of the human body. The immersive 3D experience lets users travel through organs and systems, explore within organs, and individualize physiologic functions, disease severity, and treatment. The platform can be used with a PC, VR headset, or mobile device.   Over the past 20 years, VR simulations have been applied to surgical training as well as post-stroke rehabilitation, treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder, and cognitive training of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. As VR simulations have become more sophisticated, realistic, and medically precise, their applications have flourished. Today students take online anatomy courses that use 3D VR anatomic simulations. Patients can embark on interactive virtual tours of their disease or receive immersive 3D education about complex treatment options. It’s not difficult to imagine a future in which physicians and patients enter virtual realities and arrive at the destination of individualized, patient-centric healthcare.   Featured From: The Doctor’s Channel   Featured Image:...

Preparing to Apply to Medical School

Wondering if a career as a physician would be a good fit for you? Applying to medical school is a long road and it’s important to make sure that it’s right for you BEFORE you apply.  Here are a few things to think about when deciding if medicine, or any career, is the right one for you: 1. What do you love? 2. What are you good at? 3. What can you be paid for? 4. What does the world need?   Most would agree that a career as a physician comes with a reasonable salary and is definitely something the world needs.  However, is it something that you love and/or would be good at? To figure this out, you should work with pre-health advisors (available at many undergraduate institutions) as well as find a mentor in the field of medicine. Make sure this mentor is someone who has the time to get to really know you and can guide you in the right direction. After you find a mentor or two, it’s good to get involved in a wide range of opportunities that can introduce you to different aspects of healthcare such as research studies, volunteer experience with clinical patients and leadership/advocacy roles.  When choosing what kind of activities to get involved in, it’s important to remember not only to go broad but to also go deep and show...

Warm Up for your Workout Using Science

Go to any gym and you’re bound to hear “locker room talk” on the age-old issue facing men and women alike – what’s the best way to warm up before you exercise? Static stretching, dynamic stretching, dynamic warm-ups, re-warm-ups, at what intervals… everyone has an opinion. However, Hammami et al have published a review in the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness attempting to answer just this question.   The authors searched for peer-reviewed studies from 1995-2015 in PubMed, ScienceDirect and Google Scholar and found 27 relevant articles. Twenty-two of the articles looked at warm-up effects on soccer performance and 5 articles examined performance with or without re-warm-ups during play. In the review, dynamic warm-ups were found to increase many factors such as “strength, jump, speed and explosive performances.” The review found additional performance benefits from re-warm-ups among soccer players at halftime in order to reduce postactivation potentiation, no matter how much or how little the players were on the field.   Image: Source   Moreover, the authors found that static stretching reduced subsequent performance. Other studies, such as Amiri-Khorasani et al., in the Journal of Human Kinetics, found significant increases in speed after dynamic stretching when compared to static stretching, while Behm et al., in Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, found a similar though smaller effect. These studies and others like it add more data to a...