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The Doctor's Channel

Take a bite from the adults' table. The Doctor’s Channel is the world’s leading video site for physicians. Get the latest news in clinical medicine, disease resource centers, CME programs, and Doc Life, all in under 3 mins or less.

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Scientists are Growing Mini Brains to Study Neurological Disorders

  Austrian researchers are growing cerebral organoids, a form of human tissue that resembles a developing brain, in order to study neurological disorders. The organoids are developed from adult fibroblasts (skin cells) and manipulated into pluripotent stem cells, able to develop into a myriad of body parts. The researchers are able to coax the stem cells into becoming neurons which they study to learn more about neurological diseases like autism or schizophrenia as well as potential cure.   Click here to read an article about this research in Technology...

Is There Such a Thing As Screening for Cancer Too Early?

Starting medical school, conversations swirl around the necessity of when and who to screen for certain diseases, such as breast cancer. Many factors play a role in these decisions such as, average age of onset of a disease, sex, race, ethnicity, geography, and more complicated factors that doctors and scientists all try to take into account when determining when screening exams should be given and who they should be given to. In particular, the necessity of breast cancer screening has been frequently debated amongst the medical community. When to screen, and who will pay for the screening, have been amongst the most hotly debated topics centered around this issue.   A recent report from NPR has found that mammograms for women in their 40s have limited value according to a review from the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer.  The WHO committee and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force agreed on the limited value of mammograms for women at this age but faced serious backlash for the financial implications these reviews could have. The study that the WHO IARC is basing their conclusions on found inadequate evidence that would support mammograms for women in their forties. Following these results, the US Task Force will then review public comments and responses before making their official recommendation. Whatever the recommendation may be, Congress can still mandate mammogram coverage...

This 19-Year-Old’s Invention is Unbelievable

What were you doing when you were 19? Most teenagers were probably not inventing cutting-edge medical technologies, but Easton LaChappelle had a different idea. He was able to master the software engineering necessary to complete his project within just a few months. With a mastery of technical abilities, Easton’s real goal was to create technology that was also affordable, which was when he turned to 3D printing. According to an article from Reuters, a new, economic, mind-controlled prosthesis has been developed by 19-year-old LaChappelle to improve on current robotic prostheses by reducing cost via 3D printing. The product, Anthromod, utilizes an algorithm that can sense when an increase in force applied to the device is necessary. At a cost of around 600 dollars, LaChappelle hopes to improve affordable access to these types of complex devices. There are multiple prototypes that can each fulfill different needs and the uses of 3D printing continue to be explored to help improve individual’s quality of life. So, how does 3D printing really work? Check out this infographic: And check out the full article from...

Could Herpes Cure Skin Cancer?

Melanoma is the most serious and dangerous form of skin cancer. Over 70,000 individuals are diagnosed with invasive melanomas each year, according to cancer.org. A recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology has reported that a genetically engineered herpes virus may be an effective treatment for melanoma, reports CBS News. The modified type 1 herpes virus destroys cancerous cells both alone and in conjunction with other immunotherapy treatments. These results are especially important for patients with inoperable tumors who could benefit from an alternative treatment. The treatment for one of the most common, fatal, and expensive cancers has proven successful in the third and final phase of clinical testing which is the last step before FDA approval.   Click here to check out the complete...

This Drug is No Better Than a Placebo Study Says

According to the Mayo Clinic, there are over three million cases of herniated discs in Americans each year. The oral steroid prednisone is a common treatment for this condition. Side effects can range from headache or increased back pain to nerve damage or spinal inflammation.   According to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the oral steroid prednisone may not be effective in treating acute sciatica, reports The New York Times. In a study of 267 patients with a confirmed herniated disk, after three weeks of treatment there was no distinguishable difference in pain or disability reduction between those who received prednisone and those taking a placebo. After one year following treatment, the prednisone group exhibited slightly less disability, however, researchers doubted the significance of this finding given the distance from the trials. Check out the full article, here, and the JAMA study, here!...

Move Over Viagra: A Cup of Coffee May Solve ED

According to the NIH, approximately 5% of 40-year-old men and at least 15% of 65-year-old men have experienced erectile dysfunction (ED) on a recurring basis. The Cleaveland Clinic stated that as many as 70% of men 70 or older have experienced ED as a frequent issue. CNN reported that the cost of Viagra has tripled its original cost per pill, now at $22 per pill. Meanwhile, the success rate of Viagra ranges from 48% to 81%, depending on the age and medical history of the individual, according to several studies.   A recent study published in the journal PLOS One suggests that coffee can help reduce the risk of erectile dysfunction, according to a report from CBS News. The authors analyzed data on more than 3,700 men who answered questionnaires about their caffeine intake in the previous 24 hours. It seemed that two or three cups of the caffeinated substance was the perfect amount for reducing the risk of impotence. Men who had an 85 to 170 mg intake of caffeine were 42 percent less likely to report erectile dysfunction than men who consumed less caffeine. Authors believe that coffee has this ability because it relaxes muscles and arteries in the penis, allowing for more blood flow and the ability to have an erection.   Check out the full study from PLOS ONE,...

The Future is Here: Controlling Prostheses With Thoughts Alone

In 2009, the National Library of Medicine reported that over 158,000 amputations were performed each year and that number has been and will continue to increase. The use of prosthetic rehabilitation has potential to restore lost locomotive or functional abilities and effectively improve one’s quality of life. However, many prosthetic limbs are extremely limited in their capabilities and overall usefulness, likely contributing to the significant amputee population that don’t use a prosthesis.   Now, amputees can have the ability to control their bionic prosthetic limbs with their minds through the use of tiny implanted myoelectric sensors developed by Icelandic company Ossur, according to a report by Reuters. Researchers and developers from Ossur implanted the tiny sensors in the residual muscle tissue of two amputees to trigger movement in the prosthesis through a receiver. The orthopaedics company says the implant procedure only requires local anaesthesia and is fairly quick and straightforward. Impulses go from the brain into muscles, causing the muscles to contract. The sensors in the muscles pick up the signals from the brain and the signals can move into the prosthetics causing the limb to react as the brain wants. One of the two amputees has been living with the Ossur prosthetic for over a year and the company plans to further assess the technology with clinical trials.   Check out the complete article published by Reuters,...