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The Doctor's Channel

Take a bite from the adults' table. The Doctor’s Channel is the world’s leading video site for physicians. Get the latest news in clinical medicine, disease resource centers, CME programs, and Doc Life, all in under 3 mins or less.

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Could Herpes Cure Skin Cancer?

Melanoma is the most serious and dangerous form of skin cancer. Over 70,000 individuals are diagnosed with invasive melanomas each year, according to cancer.org. A recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology has reported that a genetically engineered herpes virus may be an effective treatment for melanoma, reports CBS News. The modified type 1 herpes virus destroys cancerous cells both alone and in conjunction with other immunotherapy treatments. These results are especially important for patients with inoperable tumors who could benefit from an alternative treatment. The treatment for one of the most common, fatal, and expensive cancers has proven successful in the third and final phase of clinical testing which is the last step before FDA approval.   Click here to check out the complete...

This Drug is No Better Than a Placebo Study Says

According to the Mayo Clinic, there are over three million cases of herniated discs in Americans each year. The oral steroid prednisone is a common treatment for this condition. Side effects can range from headache or increased back pain to nerve damage or spinal inflammation.   According to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the oral steroid prednisone may not be effective in treating acute sciatica, reports The New York Times. In a study of 267 patients with a confirmed herniated disk, after three weeks of treatment there was no distinguishable difference in pain or disability reduction between those who received prednisone and those taking a placebo. After one year following treatment, the prednisone group exhibited slightly less disability, however, researchers doubted the significance of this finding given the distance from the trials. Check out the full article, here, and the JAMA study, here!...

Move Over Viagra: A Cup of Coffee May Solve ED

According to the NIH, approximately 5% of 40-year-old men and at least 15% of 65-year-old men have experienced erectile dysfunction (ED) on a recurring basis. The Cleaveland Clinic stated that as many as 70% of men 70 or older have experienced ED as a frequent issue. CNN reported that the cost of Viagra has tripled its original cost per pill, now at $22 per pill. Meanwhile, the success rate of Viagra ranges from 48% to 81%, depending on the age and medical history of the individual, according to several studies.   A recent study published in the journal PLOS One suggests that coffee can help reduce the risk of erectile dysfunction, according to a report from CBS News. The authors analyzed data on more than 3,700 men who answered questionnaires about their caffeine intake in the previous 24 hours. It seemed that two or three cups of the caffeinated substance was the perfect amount for reducing the risk of impotence. Men who had an 85 to 170 mg intake of caffeine were 42 percent less likely to report erectile dysfunction than men who consumed less caffeine. Authors believe that coffee has this ability because it relaxes muscles and arteries in the penis, allowing for more blood flow and the ability to have an erection.   Check out the full study from PLOS ONE,...

The Future is Here: Controlling Prostheses With Thoughts Alone

In 2009, the National Library of Medicine reported that over 158,000 amputations were performed each year and that number has been and will continue to increase. The use of prosthetic rehabilitation has potential to restore lost locomotive or functional abilities and effectively improve one’s quality of life. However, many prosthetic limbs are extremely limited in their capabilities and overall usefulness, likely contributing to the significant amputee population that don’t use a prosthesis.   Now, amputees can have the ability to control their bionic prosthetic limbs with their minds through the use of tiny implanted myoelectric sensors developed by Icelandic company Ossur, according to a report by Reuters. Researchers and developers from Ossur implanted the tiny sensors in the residual muscle tissue of two amputees to trigger movement in the prosthesis through a receiver. The orthopaedics company says the implant procedure only requires local anaesthesia and is fairly quick and straightforward. Impulses go from the brain into muscles, causing the muscles to contract. The sensors in the muscles pick up the signals from the brain and the signals can move into the prosthetics causing the limb to react as the brain wants. One of the two amputees has been living with the Ossur prosthetic for over a year and the company plans to further assess the technology with clinical trials.   Check out the complete article published by Reuters,...

A Surgery-Free Cure For Appendicitis?

Appendicitis inflicts nearly 300,000 Americans each year. In most clinical settings, the 30-minute surgery is the standardized solution and no other treatment options are offered. However in the past where surgery hasn’t been an option, such as for American soldiers in submarines during the Cold War, antibiotics were successfully used as an appendicitis treatment. Recently, several studies in Europe have re-investigated this treatment option and determined that antibiotics can be used to treat appendicitis instead of appendix removal surgery, reports The New York Times. Of the 1,000 participants, 70% of those who took antibiotics needed no further surgery or treatment. Where antibiotics were not effective, subsequent surgeries were completed without any additional risks. Physicians who participated in the study proposed valuable questions regarding when to offer antibiotics and when is this treatment is most cost-effective. Given these unanswered questions and the uncertainty associated with appendicitis and its causes, further study regarding the efficacy of antibiotics is warranted.   Check out the complete study published by the New England Journal of Medicine,...

Kicking a Habit: Should We Reward for Success or Penalize for Failure?

Do you smoke or bite your nails? Do you have any kind of habit, likely exacerbated by stress, that you know you shouldn’t do but just can’t stop? If you bit your nails, which would be a more effective solution: treating oneself to a manicure for a week of no biting or penalizing oneself for biting by using a ‘Bite No More’ polish that tastes awful? What if the penalty didn’t just taste bad but hurt your wallet too? A recent study published in The New England Journal of Medicine, found that smokers were more likely to enroll in reward-based cessation programs but were more successful in penalty-based cessation programs, The New York Times reported. In a study of 2,500 smokers affiliated with CVS, participants were enrolled in two different programs: a reward-based one and a penalty-based one. In the reward based-program, individuals were offered an $800 reward if they were able to go six-months without smoking. In the penalty-based program, individuals submitted a $150 deposit at the start, and after six-months if they had succeeded they would receive the deposit back and an additional $650, but if they failed they would lose their initial deposit. Researchers found that penalties such as losing a $150 deposit for cessation program failure nearly doubled one’s chances for successful quitting. Furthermore, those in the penalty program were five times as likely to quit...

Saving Time By Eliminating Showering?

If there’s one thing us AlmostDocs don’t have, it’s time. Rushing from class to class, spending hours in the library, and enjoying the occasional night away, is there any time to do anything else? Source: giphy.com According to this article, we might be able to make a little more time for ourselves by replacing our showers with a 3-minute misting of bacterial spray. The spray, called AO+ Refreshing Cosmetic Mist, contains an ammonia-oxidizing bacteria called Nitrosomonas eutropha, which is most commonly found in dirt and untreated water. It is believed that these bacteria used to exist in large quantities on humans, as well, and helped keep us clean before washing with soap and shampoo became a common practice. (a surprise to me, since I always assumed everyone just smelled really bad back then). That’s right, apparently you don’t even need deodorant if you have enough of this bacteria. Source: gifbay.com Still, people have reported a reduction in body odor and clearer, softer skin after just a month of forsaking modern bathing and instead using the AO+ Spray. So if you’re short on time, why not try a new method of hygiene, go old-school human, and save 10 minutes a day on a...