the-doctors-channel

The Doctor's Channel

Take a bite from the adults' table. The Doctor’s Channel is the world’s leading video site for physicians. Get the latest news in clinical medicine, disease resource centers, CME programs, and Doc Life, all in under 3 mins or less.

http://www.thedoctorschannel.com

Millennials, Back At It Again: Changing The Healthcare Industry

The term “millennials” is in no shortage these days, referring to the generation reaching young adulthood around the millennium. With just a simple Google search, you can find thousands of articles about millennials, usually involving social media, job hopping, or the “me” generation.   There is no doubt that times are changing and, apparently, millennials have a large part in that shift. Well, I should say technology is the real catalyst for the change and with a rising technology-obsessed generation, several industries are seeing some major impacts. Just a few examples include the food, retail, entertainment, and banking industries. Less human interaction, more transparent sourcing, and a desire for more rapid transactions are just some of the characteristics involved in the shift throughout these industries.   So, why is this relevant for med students? You guessed it. Millennials are changing the healthcare industry too.   Even though many medical students today may even be part of the millennial generation, it is important to know how your industry could be changing around you. Here are some ways that millennials may impact the healthcare industry.   Image: Source   1. Skepticism of Pharmaceutical Industry As pharmaceutical companies become more and more transparent, Americans are becoming more skeptical over the drugs they are promoting. According to a recent SERMO poll, “millennials [are] more likely to challenge doctor recommendations [and] more comfortable discussing healthcare costs.” This generation is less likely...

Changing Seasons Got You Feeling Sad? It may be SAD.

There are many reasons why autumn is such a wonderful season: the crisp, cool air, the red-, yellow-, and orange-hued leaves, the comfy clothes and comfort foods. As the summertime sadness dissipates and the holiday season quickly approaches, there is a new excitement in the air. Still, as the sun starts to rise later and later and set earlier and earlier, the amount of daylight we get each day slowly dwindles.   As a result, common phrases around this time of year include, “I hate how it gets so dark so early” or “Winter is so depressing.” It is common to feel a little sad or “down” during the fall and winter months. However, if this depressed state becomes severe, it may be SAD, or Seasonal Affective Disorder.     SAD is a type of depression that some people experience during periods with less natural light, typically during the winter. In the video below from The Doctor’s Channel, Meir Kryger, MD, FRCPC, talks about seasonal affective disorder, signs, symptoms and treatments. He notes that the symptoms of SAD are similar to those of depression. The main difference, however, is that a patient with SAD will see these symptoms start to disappear come springtime, whereas a patient with depression will continue to have these symptoms.   He also discusses the importance of light on our mood and well-being, which mostly relates to how our brain functions....

Should Nutrition Play a Bigger Role in Med School?

Since the 80s, daily exercise has gained mainstream popularity, seen by the rise of the modern gym and home fitness programs. Americans spend millions of dollars each year on gym memberships and other programs. Yet obesity has also been on the rise for decades, as we are all well aware of, and more than two-thirds of adults are considered to be overweight or obese. How could it be that the more we exercise the more we continue to gain? A major part of the equation has been missing: Nutrition.   Source   Successful weight loss does not come from exercise alone. It mostly follows as a result of a healthy diet, which the American diet is quite far from recently. Some of the blame can be attributed to the rise of the fast food industry, making food cheaper and cheaper by offering low-quality, nutrient-poor products. The temptation of a cheap, convenient meal often outweighs the desire to go grocery shopping and cook at home, especially if you are feeding a family.   Similarly, the restaurant industry in general has been a large factor in America’s bloat as another alternative to home cooking. Many restaurants are known for having huge portions compared to serving sizes you would have at home, as well as pack in way more calories and other ingredients you may not have added otherwise.   Whatever the scapegoat may be, I think...

The Key To Weight Loss May Not Be On Your Wrist

Weight loss is surprisingly a highly debated subject when it comes to best practices. There are so many questions surrounding the topic such as how many calories am I supposed to eat? Is diet or exercise more important? Should I do cardio, weights, or both? How often should I exercise? I could go on and on.   Just trying to come up with a plan is exhausting in itself, which is definitely discouraging. However, one factor is indisputable when it comes to weight loss: accountability. Many people believe that keeping track of your diet and exercise, whatever that may be, is the key to a successful weight loss plan.     Several apps have been developed to help keep track of your daily food intake, such as MyFitnessPal and My Calorie Counter. These apps show you how many calories you’re eating, and where those calories are coming from, to give you a better idea of how balanced (or unbalanced) your diet is, and may make you reconsider that late-night snack.   And there are apps to track certain activities, such as MapMyRun or Strava, such as running and cycling. However, when it comes to tracking exercise generally, things get a little more complicated. “So maybe I missed the gym today, but I walked a lot!” is something I find myself saying frequently. But just how much did I actually walk? How...

Immune Systems Need ‘Software’ Updates, Just Like Your Macbook

Larry Smarr, Founding Director, CALIT2, details the growing epidemic of children, especially those with gastrointestinal disorders, who were not exposed to the necessary microbiomes during the formative years of their immune systems.   Read more about Larry Smarr. Filmed at FutureMed, in February 2013, at Singularity...

Forget About Seat Belts, Self-Driving Cars Will Save Millions

Brad Templeton, Board Member, Foresight Nanotech Institute, explains the next great medical revolution, the self-driving car. Car accidents are the 7th leading cause of death in the US, but the advent of self-driving technology would significantly reduce the number of hospitalizations due to automobile accidents. Read more about Brad Templeton. Filmed at FutureMed, in February 2013, at Singularity...

How Valuable is an MD, MBA?

Have an idea but not quite sure how to see it to fruition? Having an MD alone may be more useful than you think to complete the process! But an MBA can offer 4 crucial “C”‘s towards successful business tactics. Arlen Meyers, MD, MBA, President and CEO of Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, weighs in:    ...