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The Doctor's Channel

Take a bite from the adults' table. The Doctor’s Channel is the world’s leading video site for physicians. Get the latest news in clinical medicine, disease resource centers, CME programs, and Doc Life, all in under 3 mins or less.

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Learn How Scientists are Decoding the Most Complex Object in the Universe: The Brain

Researchers from University College London (UCL) are working on a project with the lofty goal of analyzing the entirety of a brain’s neuronal activity in real time. Most estimates place the number of neurons in the average brain somewhere between 70 and 100 billion. Trying to record all of the relevant activity in one brain as it occurs will be difficult enough, but beyond that, the UCL team is planning to employ considerable processing power towards deciphering the meaning of each firing synapse. NeuroPixels, as the prototype probes are being called, are the width of a human hair and can monitor hundreds of neurons at once over multiple regions of the brain while simultaneously digitizing the signal on-board and sending the information to a database. Developed in collaboration with a consortium of leading non-profit organizations in neuroscience, these super-sensitive electrode sensors are already being studied in mice models, and are expected to be available for purchase by research labs in mid-2018. The researchers are already in the process of developing the next generations of these sensors. Click here to read more about this technology on the UCL News Outlet. Rafael Yuste, MD, PhD, Professor of Neuroscience at Columbia University, discusses the research goals of the brain activity map project. He explains the purpose of this ground breaking research is to develop tools that will allow scientists of the future to measure the activity of every neuron in the brain. The Brain Activity...

Is There an American Nurse Shortage?

America will need 1.1 million new nurses by 20221, but research from nursing recruitment experts Sunbelt Staffing has projected that without sweeping change, only 462,383 new nurses will be available, creating a shortage of just under 700,000. While there are currently 3.97 million active Registered Nurses2 in the country, by 2022 this number may have dropped to 3.89 million, due to a projected 500,0003 retirements from an aging workforce and an education system struggling to cope with demand. A 2016 survey by the AACN (American Association of Colleges of Nursing4) revealed that nursing colleges turned away 64,065 qualified applicants from entry-level baccalaureate nursing programs. This could total 354,569 more rejections by 2022. Worryingly, the two most common primary reasons given by nursing colleges (for baccalaureate programs) for failed applications were insufficient clinical sites (37.5%) insufficient number of faculty (27.9%), suggesting funding is a huge problem. Some of the other reasons included: • Overall budget cuts – 9.7% • Insufficient classroom space – 7.5% • Insufficient enrolment capacity for specific programs: 4.6% 65,138 entry level nurses graduated from baccalaureate programs in US colleges last year, and while graduate numbers have been on the rise (on average there are 2,455 extra registered nurse graduates every year), at that rate there will still only be 442,383 new graduates in five years’ time, with the remaining 15,030 new nurses of our total made up...

QUIZ: The Link Between Medicine and Music

Aside from the health benefits of listening to your favorite tunes, there are plenty of links between medicine and music. There’s a long history of band names, song themes and product marketing drawing inspiration from medical terms – this quiz tests how much you’ve been paying attention. Are you a music trivia genius? A medical fact repository? A healthy mix of both? Let’s find out! Test your knowledge on music medicine! The Ultimate Medicinal Music Test Which rock duo recorded the bluesy indie hit “Girl, You Have No Faith in Medicine”? What was Robert Palmer suffering from when he sang “Doctor, doctor, give me the news…”? Which dental anaesthetic did alt-rockers Eels think would sooth their soul in 1996? What was the name of the 2009 Marrow track released via a USB shaped like a pill container? Which Gregory Isaacs song shares its name with a popular cold & flu brand? Can you name the 80s band that took their name from the stimulant Dextroamphetamine? In 2017, Dexter Holland gained a PhD for his HIV research; which famous pop-punk band does he sing for? Which beloved rock star famously finished a full set after he fell from the stage and broke his leg in 2015? What percentage of different humans’ brains respond exactly the same way to musical stimulus? Diagnosis: One Hit Wonder Better luck next time. Either you’re not...

Using Geological Mapping to Sketch the Human Body

Jeroen Tromp, PhD, Associate Director of the Princeton Institute for Computational Science and Engineering, and Professor of Geosciences and Applied and Computational Mathematics at Princeton University, has been leading a team of scientists in research that translates modern geological mapping technology to the imaging of the human body. The same computational algorithms Prof. Tromp’s team pioneered in the measurement of seismic waves are being applied to ultrasonic waves used in medical imaging. The algorithms compare wave models with actual wave measurement data and extrapolates a much-improved 3D model compared with current standards. This technique offers much more information than a standard ultrasound image, but without the additional cost and burden of MRI scans. Click here to read more about this research on Princeton Invention. This new technology transforms traditional ultrasound images into three-dimensional images that could improve the diagnosis of tumors, osteoporosis and other disorders. It combines recent advances in computational power with techniques originally developed for the study of earthquakes and subterranean structures. Now they are applying the same techniques to ultrasonic waves, which share many of the same characteristics. Today’s ultrasound imaging devices work by sending sound waves through the body and constructing an image from the waves that bounce off internal...

How To Avoid Winter Depression

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a type of depression, often known as Winter Depression, that comes and goes in a seasonal pattern. The symptoms are more apparent and tend to be more severe during the winter, often beginning in autumn and lasting throughout the darker months. Some sufferers may feel the effects right up until the weather improves and days become lighter in the spring. The symptoms can include a persistent low mood, lack of energy, loss of interest in every day tasks, sleeping for longer than normal and finding it difficult to get up in the morning, irritability, a tendency to over-eat or under-eat and social withdrawal. Although the symptoms can vary in severity, they can greatly impact day-to-day activities and have a real effect on the sufferer’s life.   Aside from the different forms of counseling such as Mindfulness Therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and the use of light therapy to simulate light within your own home and reduce the negative effects that darker days can have. Within everyday routines it is important to maintain a healthy diet and add in elements such as complex carbs and Omega-3 to sustain energy levels and to boost mood. Overall it’s essential for sufferers to remember that they are not alone and there are strategies to take to relive symptoms. Mattress Online have looked into the treatment and prevention of SAD...

How Much Could Nurse Practitioners Earn?

Becoming a nurse practitioner may offer a number of perks, which, depending on the employer, can include flexible work schedules, childcare services, and educational benefits.[i] While these can be great benefits, many students considering whether or not to pursue a career as a nurse practitioner want to know how much could nurse practitioners earn. According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the average median salary for nurse practitioners across the country is $107,460 a year or $51.67 per hour.[ii] But those figures can range depending on the industry, the work environment, and where you live. This infographic from GradSchools.com, the authority resource on everything about graduate schools and graduate degrees on the web, breaks down the highest paying states and metropolitan areas, the top paying industries and work environments, and how much you might make as a nurse practitioner in your area. In the coming years, there may even be more opportunities for you enter this profession. In fact, the BLS projects the number of nurse practitioners will increase 36% for the ten years 2016 to 2026.[iii] So, if you’re considering pursuing a career as a nurse practitioner or if you have any questions about the potential earnings, click on the infographic for all the answers. How much could Nurse Practitioners Earn Courtesy of gradschools.com [i] bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/nurse-anesthetists-nurse-midwives-and-nurse-practitioners.htm#tab-5 [ii] https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/nurse-anesthetists-nurse-midwives-and-nurse-practitioners.htm#tab-1 [iii]...

How This Hospital Used A $10 Microchip to Produce 3D Ultrasound Models

Joshua Broder, MD, associate professor of surgery at Duke Health, is helping to lead a team of physicians and engineers in an effort to improve the information captured by 2D ultrasound machines. The team has developed software that couples with a simple 3D-printed case attachment and a $10 sensor chip to convert 2D image slices into a contextual 3D ultrasound model. This technology would allow existing 2D machine owners to maintain the portability and ease of use of their imaging units while greatly increasing the usefulness of the image outputs. Dr. Broder hopes the technology will advance enough to one day allow patients to use a similar device on themselves with enough accuracy to eliminate the need for a trip to an office or hospital. Click here to read more about this research on Health Imaging: “With 2D technology you see a visual slice of an organ, but without any context, you can make mistakes,” said Joshua Broder, MD, an associate professor of surgery at Duke Health and one of the creators of the technology. “These are problems that can be solved with the added orientation and holistic context of 3D technology. Gaining that ability at an incredibly low cost by taking existing machines and upgrading them seemed like the best solution to us.” “With trauma patients in the emergency department, we face a dilemma,” Broder said. “Do we take them...

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