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Rohan Jotwani, "Almost" MD/MBA

Rohan Jotwani is a co-founder of The "Almost" Doctor's Channel and serves as Managing Editor. He is currently an MD/MBA student at the Tufts School of Medicine and is an avid producer and reader on topics in digital health, neuroscience and global health. Raised in Seoul, South Korea and Flushing, Queens, Rohan graduated from Columbia University. He has previously worked at The Doctor's Channel, WebMD and Pfizer, and is the former President of the Columbia Debate team.

Tips for Getting the Most Out of Field Visits

By Alanna Shaikh Flickr | ILRI Here’s how to get the most out of your field visits: 1) Don’t call them missions. That’s just offensive. It’s a field visit, a site visit, or a trip out to see your programs. Unless you are trying to convert people to the one true faith of your choice, it’s not a mission. Calling it one implies that you’re heading out there to teach the locals what’s what. You are heading out there so the locals can teach you. Don’t forget it. 2) Always keep this in mind: your two primary goals in any trip are to learn more about your programs, and more about the context they operate in. You may have specific tasks to achieve on your trip, but if you fail at those your trip still has value as long as you learn. Flickr | highersights 3) Listen. Talk to people. Talk to your staff. Talk to your beneficiaries. Talk to government officials and community leaders, and taxi drivers. It doesn’t take probing questions, or special insight on your part, just a willingness to sit down and hear what people have to say. Pack your schedule with as many meetings as you can humanly stand. By listening, you learn how your project and organization is perceived, what your community thinks of you, and what your own staff is thinking. You...

It’s Not ALL About Saving Lives: Salaries and Satisfaction in Medical Education

  Ready to throw on that white coat? Think again. Here we give the down low on job satisfaction and salaries for the most popular medical specialties. Now for some serious dough? Find the next “King of Pop”…   Featured Image:...

Specialty That is Right For You

Link from The University of Virginia School of Medicine, Material from book “How to Choose a Medical Specialty”, by Anita Taylor Flickr | steven…ng   Decisions…decisions…every medical student has enough on their plate to begin with so the added stress of trying to choose which specialty suits you best is an unnecessary burden. BUT have no fear; there is a fast, easy and effective test to help you make this decision. Click below to check it out!   Specialty Test   Website from University of Virginia School of Medicine.   This material was originally published in the book “How to Choose a Medical Specialty”, by Anita Taylor. Anita graduated from Bryn Mawr College with an B.A. in Sociology and from Wake Forest University with a master’s degree in education and counseling. She is an Associate Professor and serves as the director of Volunteer Faculty Outreach and co-advisor to the Family Medicine Interest Group for the Department of Family Medicine. The author of “How to Choose a Medical Specialty,”, 4th edition, she is the OHSU Director of Career Advising for the medical students. She also has a special interest in physician and medical family life planning as well as faculty development. She and her husband, Robert B. Taylor, M.D. have 2 children and 4...

The Love Competition

Happy Valentine’s Day! In honor of V-day, we wanted to get nerdy with the subject of love. Is it possible for one person to love more than another person can?   On yours marks, get set, LOVE. This short documentary explores the 1st Annual Love Competition that took place at the Stanford Center for Cognitive and Neurological Imaging. Scientists asked 7 participants to “love” as hard as they could for 5 minutes while measuring brain activity via fMRI. The participants ranged in age, love experiences, and general “hipster-ness.” The researchers looked closely at the brain activity  with special focus on the Nucleus Accumbens, an area which has been shown to be an epicenter for various neural pathways signaling love.   Video: Source   While the skeptic science student in me questions such bold claims of quantifiable love based off of barely understood neural pathways (I mean, no control group…really?), the normal human in me can’t help but go ‘awww, how cute.’ Some questions that lingered on after watching the documentary included:   1. Could brain activity be supplemented with other physiological variables to give a more accurate reading of love experiences?   2. Could brain plasticity at a young age affect love’s neurobiological activity?   3. Can Hipsters really even fall in love?   4. Where can I sign up for next years???   Watch the full video on vimeo.   Click here to read more about...

Hackable Medical Devices

By Colin Son   As we become more and more reliant on active, implanted biotechnology the opportunities for malicious manipulation of such rise. The hacking of medical devices isn’t a new threat. I’ve commented on it, as have publications more prominent than this blog. The issue has taken on enough of intellectual seriousness that it has prompted the creation of a multi-institutional center, the Medical Device Security Center. In 2008 that group published a method of wirelessly accessing information from some models of pacemakers and then injecting active attacks to change the performance of the pacemakers. After publication they presented the same at Defcon.   At the Black Hat Conference last year an independent researcher presented a theoretical method of wirelessly changing the serum glucose readings of an implanted diabetic pump.   An attacker could intercept wireless signals and then broadcast a stronger signal to change the blood-sugar level readout on an insulin pump so that the person wearing the pump would adjust their insulin dosage. If done repeatedly, it could kill a person. Radcliffe suggested scenarios where an attacker could be within a couple hundred feet of a victim, like being on the same airplane or on the same hospital floor, and then launch a wireless attack against the medical device. He added that with a powerful enough antenna, the malicious party could launch an attack from up to a half mile away....

What Can Angelina Jolie Teach Us About Gene Patents?

Angelina Jolie’s op-ed in The New York Times about her preventive double mastectomy sent shockwaves through the media. She represents a new generation of patients who are able to use genetic testing to make empowered, evidence-based decisions. While experts agree that her description of the procedure resulting in a breast cancer risk reduction from an 87% to a 5% chance might be an oversimplification, her courage in the face of such a difficult choice is laudable. Jolie now joins a class of “previvors,” unencumbered by the social stigma of these types of preventive procedures.   None of this could be possible without the BRCA1 and BRCA2 test, which helped to identify the mutated genes linked to cancer. But as Jolie so adeptly points out in her piece, “The cost of testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2, at more than $3,000 in the United States, remains an obstacle for many women.”   The simple truth to take away is that while Jolie’s example will inspire many individuals to jump over the social stigma of preventative procedures, there is still one large hurdle to cross: gene patents.    Last November, the Supreme Court heard the case Association of Molecular Pathology v. U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, concerning gene patents for BRCA1 and BRCA2 held by Myriad Genetics. An article in The New York Times explains the company holds patents for “two human genes, which, when mutated, give a woman a high risk of getting breast or ovarian cancer. The patents give Myriad...

Finals Countdown by Amateur Transplants

By The Doctor’s Channel An excellent study guide for all medical students with finals coming up…   Take a bite from the adult’s table. The Doctor’s Channel is the world’s leading video site for physicians. Featuring the latest news in clinical medicine, disease resource centers, CME programs, and Doc Life (all in under 3 mins or less), it has been called “the educational youtube for docs”. ...

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