rachel-greenberg

Rachel Greenberg, "Almost" MD

Rachel Greenberg is an editor for The Almost Doctor's Channel hailing from Great Neck, NY. She graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a degree in Psychology, where she spent much of her time either singing a cappella or being a pre-med. In addition to maintaining an interest in holistic medicine, Rachel boasts a world-class Carrie Underwood impression.

11 of TV’s Hottest Docs

All I can say is I hope this is what my med school classmates look like ;). Leave a reply with your vote for hottest TV doc!    1. Dr. Michaela Quinn (Jane Seymore, Medicine Woman) Annoyingly, at age 63, Jane Seymour is, in fact, still hot.   2. Dr. Philip Chandler (Denzel Washington, St. Elsewhere)   3. Dr. Christian Troy (Julian McMahon, Nip/Tuck) *drool*   4. Dr. Remy Hadley (Olivia Wilde, House MD) I totally buy Olivia Wilde as the hot bartender in the OC (circa 2005) but as a doctor, I’m just not sure.   5. Dr. Robert Chase (Jesse Spencer, House MD) I first discovered this strapping fellow during my Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen obsession stage in my awkward teenage years (re: Winning London). The accent, the flow, and now you’re telling me he could preform CPR on me if ever needed (wanted…) – what’s there not to love?   6. Dr. Doug Ross (George Clooney, ER) I now understand why my mom was obsessed with this show.   7. Dr. Courtney Ellis (Gabrielle Union, City of Angels)   8. Dr. Drake Ramoray (Joey Tribiani, Days of Our Lives) The salt and pepper Clooney hair really wins me over on this one.   9. Dr. Derek Shepard (Patrick Dempsey, Grey’s Anatomy) I’m not sure neurosurgeons can be this hot (sorry, neurosurgeons). I sometimes question his...

Nobel Prize Winning Scientist Recreates “Inception” in Mice

I’ll be honest, I never saw Inception. Still, for all of us who haven’t, we all know the premise of the movie: someone, somehow implants an idea in someone else’s mind. It’s quite unsettling, like that feeling you get when your boss tells you that the fruit venders on the street don’t put the fruit away at night and that the rats run around on it. No sir, I would not like some cherries. But science fiction may be fiction no longer. Susumu Tonegawa, the 1987 Nobel Prize winner in Physiology or Medicine, and his team of neuroscientists at MIT have published compelling evidence suggesting that it is possible to access the memory axis and induce false memories in a mouse model. 1. Place mouse in location one. Let mouse observe the area and form memory of location one and observe the areas of the brain activated when forming this memory. 2. Place mouse in location two. Give the mouse an electric shock while at the same time stimulating the areas of the brain activated in step one. 3. Place mouse back in location one. Observe as mouse becomes frozen with fear, apparently thinking that he had been shocked in location one. The mouse, thus, was induced to believe that it were shocked in location one. Inception. Tonegawa’s findings pose interesting and thought provoking questions to not only the scientific community but also the...

What if Your Professor’s iPhone App Helped You Cheat?

What happens when technology overstays its welcome? Remember the saying, “too much of a good thing…”? The medical students of King’s College, London could probably tell you about that. The students will be retaking their most recent exam in OB/GYN after it was discovered that their professor took almost 60% of his exam questions off of an iPhone app…which he invented! The app (which is FREE, btw, so go ahead and check it out) contains practice exam questions ranging anywhere from contraception methods to the diagnosis of syphilis. That is, they would have been “practice” had the questions not then been the exact questions on the exam. The problem is, it is unclear which students actually had seen the app prior to the exam so…retake for all! None for you, Glen Cocoa! (Lol, it’s been a long day.) Today’s medicine is all about the latest technology, right? The medical field is making strides due to innovations in technologically based surgical techniques, training tools and even “digital diapers” (tracking your baby’s health by analyzing its poop…pretty genius). How would a rhinoplasty patient ever know what their nose may look like post-surgery without preoperative computer imaging planning? The horror! As the next generation of doctors enters medical school and training programs, we begin to question how medical education will evolve. Most critics of the emergence of technology in medicine cite the possible...

Dear Girl Scouts, I Love Your Cookies, But That’s The Problem

Dear Girl Scouts of America, I love your cookies. Samoas, Thin Mints, you name it, we love it. But that seems to be the problem. This morning I came across an article in MedCity News written by a cardiologist, Dr. John Mandrola, which acted as a sort of open letter to The Girl Scouts. Dr. Mandrola explains: “It happened while I was leaving a grocery store in the southeastern United States. The young girl who asked me if I wanted to buy Girl Scout cookies was strikingly perfect. She was thin, happy, and well spoken. So were her colleagues. The moms, too, were of healthy weight and cheer. It was as if they were English-speaking transplants from the Netherlands. They did not appear to be regular consumers of their own product.” According to the CDC, obesity costs this country about $150 billion a year, or almost 10% of the national medical budget. Approximately one in three adults and one in six children are obese. Obesity is an epidemic in the United States today and a major cause of death, attributable to heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Our country has made great strides in the past decade or so to address this issue, especially in our youth. In fact, a study recently published in JAMA found that obesity rates among children between the ages of 2 to 5 decreased 43% between 2003...

Harvard Med Tackles the #SELFIE

Ladies and Gentlemen, Harvard Med School has done it again. First they wow’ed us all with their “What Does the Spleen Do?” Parody of “What Does the Fox Say?” and now they’ve tackled the #SELFIE hit by the Chainsmokers. The Harvard Medical School Class of 2017 put this together for accepted students revisit and let me tell you, if the prospective students weren’t swayed by the “Harvard” name to begin with, this video most definitely won them over. Now go...

How Do You Hide a 5 Dollar Bill From….

A Radiologist: Stick it on a patient   An Orthopedist: put it in a book A Neurosurgeon: stick it on his kid’s chest An Internist: put it under a bandaid A Psychiatrist: Call a code from its location A Cosmetic Surgeon: you...

The One Major Mistake That Medical Schools Are Making

As I prepare to matriculate in medical school in August, I have had some time to reflect back on this past year which I have spent at The “Almost” Doctor’s Channel. As I witness other friends happily celebrating their acceptances, while others struggle to make alternative plans due to not-as-happy outcomes, I can’t help but wonder, “why did they choose me?” I had a decent/good MCAT score (depending who you ask). I went to a good undergraduate school and had a good/decent GPA. I was in an a cappella group because I love to sing, played on a few intramural sports teams because I loved to play sports and held a position on the board of my sorority because…well, I like having a voice within a large group. That about ends the list of extra-curricular activities that I participated in because of my own desires and interests. As pre-meds, medical students, and residents, we train from a young age to be the physicians we hope to one day be. We go to “DNA Camp” in high school (uh, was that only me?) and finagle together a sad excuse for a Siemens or Intel paper (again…any others out there who did this?), and then when we finally get into our dream college, the cycle starts all over again. We hound heads of labs in the hope of being a (unpaid)...