nurse-org

Nurse.org

You are a nurse. The heartbeat of our society. You dedicate your life to helping others, caring for the sick and healing the injured. You are the pulse that drives us, that special breed of person that stands up to the challenge when most turn away.

https://nurse.org

How Doctors and Nurses Can Work Together

Believe it or not, maintaining a healthy working relationship is often the most difficult thing for some nurses to accomplish in their career. This is usually because we are trained in nursing school to be emotional and empathic to our patient’s needs. For some, this comes more natural, while others really struggle at this.  When it comes to being professional we sometimes tend to react more emotionally then we should. It is unfortunate but lateral aggression, drama, power trips, and attention seeking personalities plague almost every workplace and especially in the healthcare field. As a nurse and particularly as a travel nurse you will run into these personalities everywhere. So let me share with you a few tips on how to fight this kind of behavior, which in turn can help you maintain a healthy working relationship with fellow nurses and physicians. Don’t Be So Emotional! Let me first start off by saying that nurses are emotional. This is not necessarily a bad thing to say considering we need to be in order to be sensitive to our patient’s needs. But reacting emotionally in tense situations and when receiving negative feedback can be a career ender for any nurse. You need to learn when to be emotional and when not to be. Make sense? It’s a tricky and often difficult skill to learn as a nurse. Let’s go over...

There Are More Jobs At Hospitals Than Just Doctors

People are coming into the healthcare system by droves because of the Affordable Care Act and the aging population. Hence, the demand for advanced educated nurses to take the reins on caring for a big portion of them has grown immensely. That means that nurse practitioner (NP) and physician’s assistant (PA) are two professions playing a vital role in America’s changing healthcare panorama. These two positions make up a lot of jobs at hospitals. NPs and PAs include direct patient care at the advanced practice level, including working independently or collaboratively. With so many baby boomers aging, the need for more graduate level health care providers is increasing by the day. Plus, the need for these professions have escalated because of the Affordable Care Act with more than 40 million more people added to the primary care systems after finally getting health insurance in the last two years. “Physician assistants and nurse practitioners are more cost effective in a health care system, and there has been an amazing up swell interest in how to integrate them into hospital systems in more and more ways,” says Jonathan Bowser, director and associate dean of the Physician Assistant Program at University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. Read about what nurses can do that doctor’s can’t.  Learn More about getting a nursing degree. Here is a look at the growth outlook, salary range,...

What Can Nurses Do That Doctors Can’t?

Patients are increasingly turning to nurse practitioners instead of physicians for a number of reasons. For one thing, they may be more accessible since physicians’ offices are sometimes overcrowded and an appointment is hard to come by. It can also help lower the cost of medical treatments since nurses don’t bill out as high as doctors do. Mostly it’s because people are coming to realize that nurse practitioners are extremely capable and knowledgeable health professionals that can offer a high level of excellent care. In fact, because of their background in nursing, some even say that nurse practitioners have a unique ability to make stronger connections with their patients. As more nurse practitioners open their own practices or become more commonplace in medical facilities, the big question that’s been on the mind of those in the medical community is if nurses can actually replace doctors. There is no simple answer, but there’s no doubt that nurse practitioners are certainly making an impact in the healthcare world. Learn More about getting a nursing degree. Take a look at how nurse practitioners compare with doctors, and why in some cases, their services might be interchangeable. What can nurse practitioners do NPs have to go well beyond the education and training of a regular RN in order to practice at that advanced level. For starters, you must complete a master’s or doctoral...

Should Nurses Date Doctors? 6 Reasons Why They Shouldn’t

Most nurses have seen the Grey’s Anatomy episode where Rose, the nurse, and Derek, the dreamy surgeon, take their relationship to the next level. But it’s not that simple. Nurses rarely sneak off to on-call rooms in the middle of a shift. In fact, hospital call rooms have very small, squeaky beds and very thin walls! Doctors used to marry nurses — it was a more common practice in previous generations. Now, nurses are choosing NOT to date doctors. Here’s a list of reasons why you may not want to either. 1. Nurses shouldn’t date doctors because they have crazy hours Typically, nurses enter into relationships with first year interns or residents. After all, most fellows or attending physicians are engaged or married. Interns are assigned quite possibly the worst schedule and on-call rotation in the hospital. So, a relationship can be tough. At a facility I’m familiar with, interns in the ICU and cardiology are on call every third day and cover one week of night call per month. Residents (second and third years) are on call every fourth night. My advice: avoid dating medical trainees. That is, unless you want to coordinate your crazy hours with those of the intern or resident. 2. Nurses shouldn’t date doctors because you get the looks, gossip, and questions When a nurse and a doctor date, it becomes everybody’s business. Coworkers feel invested in these relationships and...