mdjourney

Lakshya Trivedi, TheMDJourney

My name is Lakshya (pronounced Luck-sh) and I’m a third-year medical student at UT Southwestern in Dallas, TX. TheMDJourney is my effort to give helpful advice and personal experiences to anyone on a similar journey. It is also my dedicated form of self-reflection and a project I hope to keep on going for a while.

https://www.themdjourney.com

Here’s A Resource I Used To Raise My Step 2 Score By 15 Points

In this post, we’re going to do something that’s really popular on the blog which is going over one of my top recommended resources. This resource has really helped me raise my Step 2 score by 25 points from my Step 1. It also raised my Step 2 score by 15 points over my goal score! What’s that resource? Dum roll… OnlineMedEd! In this post, I’m going to give a full OnlineMedEd review and insight into how I used it to study for shelf exams and my Step 2 CK exam! I know a lot of you guys know about OnlineMedEd and for the few of you don’t, I hope you stick around the whole post just to understand what this resource can offer you. For those of you guys that are familiar with OnlineMedEd, stick around because I’m going to go over how I used it to do well in my rotations, how I used it to do well on my Step 2 exam and  I’ll provide you guys a discount for any of you interested in their premium content, which I highly recommend.  If you’d like a video format of this post, check out the YouTube channel! So without any further ado, let’s get to the post! What Is OnlineMedEd? So quick intro into OnlineMedEd for any of you guys that aren’t familiar. It’s what I like to definitely consider...

Why I Took A Gap Year

Should you do a gap year before applying to med school? In this post, we’ll go over some of the benefits of doing a gap year. I’ll also share my own experience. That’s right – I did a gap year! Really quickly I’ll give you my experience and then I’ll provide you a general perspective on gap years. My Own Experience Taking A Gap Year Before Med School: People often forget that I took a gap year. But my gap year has been one of the most influential in my life. I graduated with my bachelors in 3 years. I didn’t have the financial capability to afford a 4-year education without requiring loans. But I also didn’t feel prepared to jump straight into medical school. I still felt mentally immature and inexperienced. So I made it a decision to take a gap year and apply to med school during my “4th year of college”. What did I do during my time off? I worked part-time a behavioral therapist one-on-one with autistic children. It’s by far the best job I’ve ever had! I had a light schedule, had a great salary, and developed my interpersonal communication skills with one of the toughest crowds out there. Working with my kiddos (clients) was a life-altering experience. But it also helped me on my med school interview. On every interview I went on, they...

Why Use Speed Listening in Medical School?

Wouldn’t you just love to have a fast-forward button in medical school? Or wouldn’t you just crave for the ability quickly get through the boring lectures that you have every day? Have you ever avoided watching a Pathoma or Sketchy Pharm video because they were too long? What if I told you that you could use speed listening in medical school and cut your studying time in half? In this post, I will go over how to use speed listening in medical school. I will break down my step by step method that I used for my first two years of medical school. I also break down how I used speed listing to study for my Step 1. Why Use Speed Listening in Medical School? Many people get scared away when I mention speed listening in medical school. But honestly, I can’t think of going through medical school without it.  I had so much free time and my grades remained high while using speed listening, Thus I think speed-listening is something that should be tried by every medical student! Maybe you’re not a believer just yet. You may argue that it’s hard enough to listen to your lectures at 1x much less increasing that to 2x. I’d first argue that you don’t remember much of what you hear anyways. The typical saying is that you remember 10% of what you...

So You Got Accepted To Medical School! Here’s What You Need To Know

So you got accepted to medical school, congrats! You’re probably an excited and pretty damn nervous. What is the first year of medical school like? What should you expect? How hard is the first year of medical school? What are some good tips for the first year of medical school? So many questions – slow down then there. Jokes aside, in this post I will go over my favorite tips for the first year of medical school. Let’s get to it! How Hard is the First Year of Medical School? While medical school is difficult, it’s not as hard as everyone makes it out to be. Yes, doctors and medical students are smart, but this idea is a little misleading. Many students are geniuses – I’m not one of them. Still, I’d consider myself to have above average intelligence and capable to be a good doctor. What makes a medical student into a great doctor is the continual practice and time we put in medical school. Most students would agree that the toughest part of medical school is remaining consistent.  But the actual material in medical school is not much harder than your college classes. So how hard is the first year of medical school? It’s like eating a plate of pancakes! Pancakes? Sign me up! The pancake analogy is my favorite way to describe what the first year of medical school...

Here’s What You Need To Know Before Applying to Medical School

College students are always asking “how do I get into medical school?”. Before we even ask that it’s important to know what’s important before applying to medical school. Wouldn’t you want to know the basis of what makes a high-quality medical school applicant? In this post, I break down what I think are essential items you need to know before applying to medical school. Learn how hard medical school really is in my first pre-med post! But first, let me give you some insight into my applicant process. When I was applying to medical school, l I was not a stressed out applicant. In fact, I was anything but. How do you ask? I had developed a strategic plan from the very start. I knew how I would gradually develop a competitive resume. I knew that my gameplan would lead me to become a high-quality medical school applicant. Did I know I would get into medical school on my first try? Did I think I’d receive acceptance offers from every school I interviewed at? Did I know I would get into one of the top institutions in the country? Absolutely not but I was confident I would do well! Now maybe you’re thinking I did well because of a stellar MCAT or a high GPA. I had an average MCAT and a decent GPA. It was the extracurriculars which made me a...

The Best And Most Consistent Method of Writing Notes

Do you ever get stressed out when you’re told to have your progress notes ready by a certain time? Do you ever spend more than 30 to 45 minutes doing your notes? Do you not know what to add and sometimes add too much? What’s a consistent method of writing notes in medical school anyway? In this post, I will go over a step-by-step approach to writing notes in medical school. This will be a technique that you can use every morning to not only have your notes in but to do them well. Develop a Structure Before You Begin Your Notes: I’m assuming we’re referring to writing notes on our patients before rounds. If you’re in clinic then the approach is similar. The first thing I do in the morning is to have a structured way of collecting overnight data. I open my progress note template. The template is something I’ve precreated and seperates my note into the typical SOAP (Subjective, Objective, Assessment/Plan) format. Since I have a template I can just type in overnight events, new vitals, the physical exam that day, and the plan for the day. First I read the notes since my last progress note. I pay attention to any major events, new symptoms, or specialist recommendations in the subjective portion of my note. Don’t worry about grammar or spelling right now. We’ll make final...

The Perfect Medical School Morning Routine

One of the original posts from the blog was about my miracle morning in medical school. Since then I’ve adopted a consistent 4:30 wake up time and a new morning routine. In this post, I will go over my updated perfect medical school morning routine. Wake Up At 4:30: Yes I still wake up at this ungodly hour. In fact, today I woke up at 3. Why? Read this post on how waking up at 4:30 changed my life for the better.  To help myself get out of bed by 4:30 I start setting alarms at 3:30 and 4. To be honest, even after 1.5 years of waking up at 4:30, it’s still not easy. But as soon as I swing my legs over the bed and get up – I’ve won. The thing I’ve found which makes this easier is to have a solid evening routine. When I wake up I already know what I will be working on. This takes the decision making out of it. All I need to do is get my butt out of bed. “To be honest, even after 1.5 years of waking up at 4:30, it’s still not easy. But as soon as I swing my legs over the bed and get up – I’ve won.“ Read for 30 Minutes: If you follow my mini resolutions post (you should if you aren’t) then you’re aware that I’ve read 12 book before the end of February. What?...

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