kiera-cunningham

Kiera Cunningham

Kiera is an editor for The Almost Doctor's Channel. She graduated from Loyola University Maryland with a major in Biochemistry and a minor in French. She is currently applying for medical school to begin in the fall of 2014. Kiera also enjoys horseback riding, skiing, hiking with her dog, Charlie, and playing piano.

1 is 2 Many, We Need Your Help

Sexual assault is a serious problem all over the world, but you can help stop it! I believe that one of the best practices in solving a problem is to start by honestly talking about it. By sharing your concerns, thoughts and feelings, you provide others with information about an important topic, spread awareness and allow people to feel more comfortable discussing potential solutions. And, all you docs and “almost” docs are extremely influential people who can make a difference. So please, join the initiative to put sexual assault to an end! Because 1 is 2 many….     Featured image is edited screen shot from video...

Has “The Natural Effect” Outsmarted You?

Odds are, if you’re an almost doc, you are relatively intelligent…. But, false advertising may have gotten the best of you: “The classic before and after…and who doesn’t want a big d!*k?” We’ve all fallen for it at least once before – med students and premeds are human too – but  after countless hours of learning and studying about health and nutrition, did “the natural effect” outsmart you?     Featured image is screenshot from above...

19 Things To Do Now That You’ve Matched

1. Go on vacation 2. Catch up with people you haven’t had time to be in touch with 3. Enjoy a good book   4. Let loose for a week 5. Then get organized   6. Sell your USMLE books for some extra cash 7. When no one buys your USMLE books, let them see their last days in a summer bonfire….just don’t get crazy and throw in Step 3 books!   8. Cook yourself a 5 course meal…and leave the dishes until the morning   9. Facebook stalk your new intern class 10. Start researching your new city   11. Make a bucket list of things to do in your current city before you leave   12. Do absolutely nothing productive for a full day   13. Thank everyone who has supported you 14. Pamper yourself and do a spa day (you too, boys) 15. Reflect on your med school experience and share it by submitting a post to The “Almost” Doctor’s Channel 16. Sleep   17. Be thankful and proud of your accomplishment. Celebrate! 18. Remember that others did not have as positive an outcome — Join the campaign to SaveGME and residency spots for your peers 19. Keep up your hard work!!!       Featured image from Flick | Mario G. Piniac...

Best of the Best: Our 6 Favorite Tweets From Match Week

Match Day is just a day away! While this day causes many 4th year med students an almost unbearable about of anxiety, let’s not forget that it is also a very exciting and rewarding time! We’ve had our eyes out for the best tweets of Match Week to share and celebrate the success of all M4s. Good luck!!   1. I feel like you can’t look at this picture and without feeling happy and excited. We truly enjoy seeing smiling faces for dreams made a reality!   2. As difficult as it is sometimes, following your dreams wholeheartedly will be worth it.   3. It’s always nice to hear someone who has already been in your shoes explain that going into medicine brought them happiness. I think that hearing these words of encouragement during times of great stress and uncertainty is reassuring and reminds med students of how fortunate they are to have reached their goals.   4. Awesome to see so many med students who’ve likely been through the rough times together now with huge smiles and enjoying each other’s success. For me, this demonstrates the importance of collaborating and building relationships in med school. Gotta have people by your side for the good times and the bad!   5. Not only is Match Day exciting for the M4s who match, but also for their friends and family....

What If Your Anatomy Textbook Included These Dissections

Anatomy is definitely not a dull subject. Sure, many people think dissecting a cadaver is vile, but pre-meds and med students know it’s actually a very special opportunity to learn about the human body and develop a respect for its amazing complexity. So as horrifying as it may seem, studying anatomy and performing dissections is not something many people experience so don’t take your studies for granted! I do admit that sometimes, no matter how interesting the subject, studying it, over and over and over again, can be frustrating and off putting. So take break from your textbooks and check out this amazing artwork by Jason Freeny and see how creative and fun anatomy can be!     Permission to use these images was provided by Jason Freeny. Check out some of his other works by clicking...

How To Take The Perfect Nap

Sleep is an amazing thing, and something that most medical students don’t get enough of. Yes, sometimes pulling an all-nighter to study is necessary, but no matter how many hours you study, catching an ample amount of those precious Zzzs will allow you to recall information, think quickly and clearly, and subsequently, pass your exam. When you really don’t have time to get a full night’s sleep, a nap can make you feel refreshed both physically and mentally. Here are some great tips to make sure you optimize your nap time. Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually. Infographic and featured image from http://visual.ly/...

A Final Thought as American Heart Month Comes to an End

As American Heart Month comes to an end there are a few things doctors and “almost” docs should think about when treating patients at risk of heart disease. The number one consequence of misdiagnosis is jeopardizing patient safety. Of course doctors do everything in their power to protect and better patients’ health; however, when women with heart disease are misdiagnosed, the consequences that doctors face are extremely important to understand. This infographic provides great information about the consequences of misdiagnosis and and ways to prevent that from happening. Protect the patient and protect...