ieroo-park

Ieroo Park

Ieroo is an editor for The Almost Doctor's Channel. He graduated from Boston College with a degree in English, and is looking forward to becoming an "Almost Doc". In his spare time, he enjoys playing basketball, tennis, and taking selfies with Dr. Ruth.

MedLife Hacks: 13 Workspace Hacks to Help You Ace Finals

It’s finals time, but before you go out and buy pens and post-its in every color of the rainbow, you should think more about what matters most: your workspace. Here are the best workspace hacks to boost productivity.   13. Screw guttering into the bottom of your desk to tidy up all those wires.   12. Use binder clips to keep your cables from falling behind your desk.   11. For all your classical/trance/instrumental study music   10. Cuz you want your chi flowing freely while you cram for that anatomy final.   9. Use an old pen spring to keep charger and headphone wires from bending and breaking.   8. You’ve been meaning to catch some rays and waves, but this’ll have to do. Just no sand castles please.   7. Be economical. You need every available square inch for your pilates workouts   6. Out of AA? No problem. Just stick some tin foil to the negative end of a AAA battery until you have time to pick up the right size.   5. For the gym rats out there.   4. Cuz Time = Money and Bathroom Breaks = Time, so here’s to timely bathroom breaks.   3. A simple wifi boosting tip you could recommend to your generous neighbors! With an old beer can, utility knife and scissors, build a remarkably easy and effective Wi-Fi extender with...

This is Literally the Coolest Stuff You Can Do with Your Hands

Sick of all the wires, hand cramps, and bad back posture? The days of slouched, two-dimensional wired computing may soon be a thing of the past. The gesture motion breakthrough that is Leap Motion offers the opportunity for use in a crazy amount of applications. Elon Musk gives a demo of how this technology can be used to design actual rocket parts— without ever touching a piece of metal or a keyboard. Pretty damn amazing. I mean, imagine being able to build your own dream car or a new prosthetic leg from the comfort of your own home.   In this clip we see a veterinary surgeon manipulating CT scans while already scrubbed into surgery. You can easily see the advantages to having patient info and cbct scans to browse at your leisure during surgery. In the future, analyzing 3D scans of target organs during surgery could vastly improve the effectiveness of surgeons, and eliminate errors. The possibilities are endless.   And if you thought that was all boring, you could always go home and make an armored suit to fight delusional global...

This Haunting Account of First Moments in Blindness Will Make You Rethink Your Perspective on Life and Love

It’s good habit every now and then to take some time to reevaluate our perspectives on the world around us. This short documentary is a dramatization of the audio diary by theologian John Hull, whose journey into blindness is one filled with not only fear and uncertainty, but also hope and realization of the beauty in life. It’s an evocative and deeply personal struggle that offers a depth of perception that’s refreshing and insightful. Here are some of the more thought-provoking lines from the short documentary: “I found that memories of photographs were more easily recaptured.” “To what extent is loss of the image of the face tied up with loss of the image of the self and what is the consequent feeling of being a ghost or a mere spirit?” “We have lost something very close, something very intimate.” For the story behind ‘Notes on Blindness,’ click here: nytimes.com/notesonblindness   All images are screenshots from the...

A History of the Brain, In 3 Minutes

With Obama’s Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies, or BRAIN project now underway, it’s hard to believe how little we actually know about the brain. It was only in the latter half of the 20th century, and particularly the 90s, that legitimate funding and efforts were made to learn about the brain. This short video gives you a look at how we’ve come to understand the 3 pound pile of mush sitting in your head.   Featured image is a screenshot from video...

Architect Makes Homes Out of Paper…Watch How They Change Lives

Shigeru Ban is a world renowned Japanese architect known for his groundbreaking work in architecture and design. He is most famous for his use of paper, which has been used as an exceptionally efficient material for housing refugees and victims of major disasters. His low cost  disaster-relief housing designs, which utilize local and sustainable resources, have been used in Japan after the Kobe earthquake, in Turkey, Rwanda and around the world.   Featured image taken from video...

Can a Robotic Needle Safely Eliminate Blood Clots?

A new video from Scientific American introduces a new tool that may be able to treat patients with dangerous blood clot in the brain. Researchers at Vanderbilt University are perfecting a robotic needle that will suck blood clots free without harming healthy tissue around it. The technology will use steerable needles to penetrate the brain with minimal...

Why Your Most Satisfied Patients are 26% More Likely to Die

Why do we want to become doctors? Many of us find a purpose and passion for the care of others. We want to be honest with ourselves, but even more so, with our patients. So how is it that some of the country’s best doctors could just as easily have the worst patient satisfaction scores? More than ever before, patient satisfaction has become a vital factor in evaluating physician and hospital performance. Press Ganey is one of the top providers of patient satisfaction surveys, with vast government funding and full administrative support for analyzing customer satisfaction data. However, not everything has gone according to plan. In fact, according to research at UC Davis, the most satisfied patients are 12 percent more likely to be hospitalized and 26 percent more likely to die. In an effort to boost patient satisfaction scores, more and more doctors are resorting to “overtreatment” and over-prescribing. It’s the key to making patients happy and in turn, getting better ratings. A recent Forbes article reported: In a recent online survey of 700-plus emergency room doctors by Emergency Physicians Monthly, 59% admitted they increased the number of tests they performed because of patient satisfaction surveys. The South Carolina Medical Association asked its members whether they’d ever ordered a test they felt was inappropriate because of such pressures, and 55% of 131 respondents said yes. Nearly half said they’d improperly prescribed antibiotics and narcotic pain...