ieroo-park

Ieroo Park

Ieroo is an editor for The Almost Doctor's Channel. He graduated from Boston College with a degree in English, and is looking forward to becoming an "Almost Doc". In his spare time, he enjoys playing basketball, tennis, and taking selfies with Dr. Ruth.

This Isn’t Your Average Toy – The Mine Kafon

Inspired by the makeshift wind-powered toys of his Afghan childhood, Massoud Hassani is on the verge of something special.   The Mine Kafon is a low-cost wind-powered mine detonator with the appearance of a giant, spiky-armed tumbleweed. Check out his Kickstarter campaign. As a child living in war-torn Afghanistan, Massoud Hassani was well acquainted with the devastating nature of war and the long, perhaps endless road to recovery. Landmines concealed underground are a ubiquitous threat to countless communities in Afghanistan. A report from the Electronic Mine Information Network states that “over one million Afghans (3.7% of the total population) live within 500 meters of landmine contaminated areas.” Growing up, Hassani was a tinkerer; of particular interest to him was the creation of wind-powered toys, which he would race with other children in the windy, desert outskirts of Kabul. His interest in engineering led him to pursue a degree at the Design Academy Eindhoven.   Out of this tumultuous past sprung the idea for the Mine Kafon, a wind-powered mobile constructed from biodegradable plastic and bamboo. Hassani’s creation has caught the eyes and imaginations of many, and the prototype has been exhibited all across the globe. It was exhibited by The Museum of Modern Art in March of 2013.   Featured image is a screenshot from the video...

Ridiculous Things Pre-Meds Say

Getting a medical school acceptance is one of the most exciting moments in a Pre-Med’s life. We found that this joy might alter the state of mind of some students, in turn causing them to post some pretty ridiculous things on internet blogs. After reading through The Student Doctor Network thread “Class of 2017”, we found a few of these gems to share with you. Pre-Med #1 Haha! I actually created a formula to determine the price of dinner: If you win (your guess <= my score) then I will buy you a dinner according to the brackets below: Guess: 1-20 then (score/10) ie. You guess 15 then I will buy you a dinner that costs at least than 1.5$ Guess: 21-27 then (score/8) Guess: 28 – 29 then (score/5) Guess: 30-38 then (score/2) Guess 39+ then (score/1) This is to limit the amount of people who guess low numbers to insure free food and to reward someone who takes in insane guess by guessing >39 which is almost statistically impossible. If I win you owe me a dinner according to the following formula (Your Guess – My Score) x 2 I.e. if you guess 35 and I score a 28 then you owe me a 14$ dinner. Well even if I don’t do well I am planning to make sure everyone else does equally bad. (not you guys but the...

Is IBM’s Watson The Future Of Medical Decision Making?

Ever since soundly winning Jeopardy! in 2011, IBM’s Watson has been quite busy.   Besides soundly beating out members of Congress in an untelevised Jeopardy! match, Watson also became possibly the smartest second-year medical student of all time. But like any bright medical student, Watson didn’t just stop there.   IBM recently announced the development of two paradigm-shifting projects, WatsonPath, a diagnosis and education program, and Watson EMR Assistant, a tool for analyzing information stored in medical records. Building upon Watson’s question-answering abilities, WatsonPath draws from clinical guidelines, evidence-based studies, and reference materials to either support or refute a set of hypotheses. WatsonPath is essentially the algorithm machine every medical student wishes they had in their head during board exams. And with a “learning regimen” that includes breaking down board-style questions, why wouldn’t WatsonPath score the highest USMLE score ever?   How can WatsonPath be used as an educational tool? The video above explains how the project not only offers answer suggestions, but also displays a schematic flow diagram showing the reasoning behind answers and confidence levels. WatsonPath breaks down clinical scenarios the same way any medical student would, looking at signs and symptoms, interpreting lab values, and searching for key associations. The project is currently being assimilated into the Problem-Based Learning (PBL) curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine.   Beyond the classroom walls, the possibilities...

10 Ways to Celebrate Match Day

Here are the 10 best ways to meet your Match.   10. A good old fashioned flash mob   9. Wait…isn’t that the Chris Brown dance?   8. The High Five – the lowest fruit on the congratulatory tree   7. Some crazy shuffling   6. Grab the nearest dude and start crying on his shoulder   5. Rise up from the crowds   4. Go Nuts- just remember you are part of a prized group of intellectuals trained to save lives and cure cancer   3. The Leapfrog   2. Get on the floor and do some windmills   1. Anchorman jump into a pool       Featured image is a screenshot from Youtube/Livin’ Fly Med School Parody (Young, WIld & Free...

Salaries and Satisfaction in Medical Education [Infographic]

  Ready to throw on that white coat? Curious about the years of training and expected salaries of various specialists? Here we give the lowdown on job satisfaction and salaries for the most popular medical specialties. Looking for some serious dough? Find the next “King of Pop”… Featured image from...

How “The Memory Palace” Will Help You Reach Med School Glory

Let’s face it. We’re not getting any younger any time soon, and same goes for our memories. But this one ancient technique may be able to rectify the squishy situation in our heads. Deemed the ‘memory palace’ by a Greek lyric poet, Simonides, this technique involves using a visual set of mnemonics that were widely used in oral societies for hundreds of years. In fact, it is the same technique Cicero used to memorize his famous speeches. Here’s a quick guide on how to use “The Memory Palace” to create a “journey” of information:   Here’s a more in depth look at the science behind the memory palace and how to develop your very own memory palaces:   Here’s a Ted Talk with Joshua Foer, a science journalist who trained himself to win the 2006 USA Memory Championships:   Featured image from Flickr | LOLO13500  ...

Are Physicians Ready for a New Generation of Transgender Parents?

In the U.S., 1 out of 3 trans people are parents (1 out of 4 in Canada). It’s an issue that most of us have probably never even considered as a possibility As you’ll see, in addition to the usual trials of parenting, they face some unique challenges. Let’s open up our health care and legal systems so they do a better job of supporting trans people to be the terrific parents they want to be. This  jumps directly into an ongoing conversation among trans people about parenting. It’s a beautiful snapshot of current issues, struggles and strengths of transexual, transgender and gender fluid parents (and parents to be) in North America...

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