everett-rosenfeld

Everett Rosenfeld

Everett Rosenfeld is an editor for the Almost Doctor’s Channel. Originally from Baltimore, MD, he just graduated from Yale University with a major in Ethics, Politics, and Economics. In addition to medicine, he is interested in finance and comic books.

Know Your History: The Rise, Fall, and Rise of American Med School

Most people know that the number of med schools is rising — after all, there is an ongoing physician shortage in the United States, so the demand for newly trained domestic doctors has never been higher. But maybe you didn’t know that only in recent years has the number of these institutions exceeded the count of medical schools in 1910. Yes, in that year there were about 148 degree-granting medical education facilities, while now there are 141 MD programs and 29 DO programs. Why were there so many over a century ago? Was the demand really that high? Why were most of these institutions abolished preceding the decades-long trend of new schools beginning every year? Read on to find out. A little piece of medical history: In 1910, education theorist Abraham Flexner released a report entitled “Medical Education in the United States and Canada: A Report to The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.” In the 346-page document, the academic eviscerated the state of medical education in the country — a system that enjoyed none of the international standing of the present day. Flexner decried the “singular fact” that “the organization of medical education in this country has hitherto been such as not only to commercialize the process of education itself, but also to obscure in the minds of the public any discrimination between the well trained physician and the...

Why Does Healthcare in America Cost SO Much?

There are a lot of talking points flying around the public sphere about the true nature of America’s sky-high healthcare costs: Are malpractice suits to blame? Or is it the resulting defensive medicine? Is there over-utilization? Is it administrative inefficiencies? Or do all of these issues barely account for fractions of the problem in comparison to the larger systemic market failure contributing to the lion’s share of the U.S.’s unprecedented costs? In case it wasn’t obvious: it’s the latter. In his latest video, author and critic John Green spells out the crux of the issue in the clearest possible way, it’s definitely worth a quick watch no matter how much you think you know about insurance and healthcare policy. “It’s vital that we grapple with it meaningfully instead of just treating healthcare costs as political...

German Docs Successfully Test The Surgery Tool of The Future

It’s been called the iSurgery room — which may or may not seem like a blatant ripoff of every hackneyed attempt to seem cool and tech-y in the past decade — but this is no bit of hollow branding. Rather, it is an exciting new step in augmented reality for surgeons, and it is (incredibly) based on the consumer iPad! German company Fraunhofer MEVIS announced that their tablet app was successfully used by surgeons at the Asklepios Klinik Barmbek in Hamburg during a liver operation. The company described the problem their technology is seeking to remedy: A liver cancer operation usually lasts many hours because the organ is difficult to operate. It hosts a branching vessel structure through which one and a half liters of blood flow every minute. If a surgeon makes a cut in an inappropriate place, this puts the patient at risk of severe blood loss. In addition, doctors must ensure that the patient retains enough organ volume for survival and that this volume is sufficiently supplied with blood. To accomplish this, doctors need to know as accurately as possible both before and during an operation where blood vessels inside the organ are located. The new tablet app from the Fraunhofer Institute for Medical Image Computing MEVIS in Bremen promises to deliver this support. It is based on the established MEVIS software for liver operation planning that is employed in...

Turn Your Smart Phone Into An Advanced Biosensor

Researchers at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign have created an add-on for smart phones that turn the device into an advanced biosensor. In addition to allowing doctors and patients the opportunity to quickly analyze a sample, the cradle also leverages your phone to replace expensive scientific equipment. Check out an Associated Press video about the technology: Part of the genius of this app/cradle combination is just how many different technologies are crammed into a small package: you can test for peanut traces, bacteria, water toxins, and crop contaminates with the same device. That’s smart tech. Read more about it from the Associated...

The Memory Trick Every Med Student Should Know

Anyone studying medicine knows that there is a ton of information that you need to just buckle down and memorize. Sure, you’ve tried the obvious strategies for remembering tricky facts — like mnemonics or repetition — but sometimes you need more than this basic toolkit to get through the next examination. One solution to this problem comes courtesy of Shiv Gaglani, an MD/MBA candidate at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Harvard Business School, who recently wrote for Fast Company about his personal memory trick that has helped him throughout his academic career. Utilizing the principles of association, Gaglani recommends mentally attaching new facts to stories, as they hold more psychological significance than a mere mnemonic. To illustrate the trick, Gaglani explains that he will always remember that one side effect of bleomycin is pulmonary fibrosis because he recalls how then-upstart cyclist Lance Armstrong declined the cancer treatment in 1996 in fear of scarring his lungs. Whenever possible, Gaglani writes, he attempts to marry facts with associations stronger than the average nonsense phrase used by decades of students. And so the idea for Osmosis was born. This side project of Galani’s is a “web-based platform that, among other things, automatically recommends associations” for any topic that a medical student would need to memorize. The online tool is still in the beta phase, but Gaglani writes that he expects it to continue growing. “We’re focusing on...

These Students Know the Power of a Compliment

Stony Brook Compliments, a Stony Brook University club dedicated to spontaneous acts of kindness, surprised a night-shift worker at their local Dunkin’ Donuts with thanks and applause. It’s pretty inspiring what a couple of minutes out of these students’ lives can mean to someone, and how easy it is to do good in the world. Watch the video below for the whole...

Watch This Google Glass Demonstration On Beginning a Patient Exam

Do you find yourself questioning how to best begin a patient examination? Or how about wondering what the perfect exam looks like from the doctor’s point of view? Stanford physician Abraham Verghese answers both of these questions in this short, but interesting video. Here’s the secret: it’s all in the hands. Verghese created Stanford Medicine 25, an initiative comprising workshops and videos that teach the 25 most essential techniques for examining and evaluating a patient. Although he is probably the first accused Luddite to do so, Verghese is not the first doctor to use Google Glass for medical...

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