dr-fizzy

Dr. Fizzy

I'm a midwestern physician who has finally finally finally come to the end of my grueling medical training, and at last I have enough time to publish the wealth of cartoons I've created over the years. If you enjoy them, please comment. If you don't enjoy them, then you can just keep your fool mouth shut. Read the rest at Doccartoon.blogspot.com, and make sure to check out his book, A Cartoon Guide To Becoming A Doctor, on Amazon!

https://www.amazon.com/Cartoon-Guide-Becoming-Doctor/dp/1105091023

Your Attending Is Pimping You, What Do You Do?!

Ah pimping, the most infamous of medical training traditions. If you’re a gunner, pimping is like someone asking you if you brush your teeth every day (you know the answer instantaneously (hopefully), but if you’re a normal human being, your stream of consciousness probably looks a little more like this: See more by Dr. Fizzy here....

What’s Inside Your White Coat?

Sure, on the day of your White Coat Ceremony you think your white coat will remain the spotless perfection that it is when it is slipped over your shoulders in front of your tearfully proud family… Soon enough, your realize that, inevitably, your beauty will turn up like this: See the original cartoon and more by Dr. Fizzy here....

Dear White Coat: It’s Not Me, It’s You

After diligently shrugging on my white coat for pretty much every single day throughout my entire residency, I abandoned my coat the minute I graduated. I haven’t worn one at all since I’ve been an attending. Here’s why:   1) No other physicians I work with wear a white coat, except for the weird ones… 2) They get dirty so easily. And of course, they show every speck of dirt because obviously they are white. Duh. My white coat from residency retired with a layer of indelible grime on the sleeves and hemline. I have to believe white coats are incredibly unsanitary. 3) If you are a female, you cannot pee while wearing a white coat. If you keep it on, you risk dipping it in the toilet. That is a fact. If you take it off, where are you supposed to put it? On the nonexistent hook on the stall door? On the floor?? 4) While it was nice having the pocket space, I think the sheer number of things I always kept in the pockets was contributing to neck pain. 5) The white coat does absolutely nothing to decrease the number of patients who call me “nurse”.   I do keep my white coat around, mostly in case the air-conditioner goes crazy and I need an extra layer of clothing. But I can’t really see going back...

Your First Week of Med School in a Nutshell

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Dr. Fizzy’s Declassified Step1 Survival Guide

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Confessions of a Third Year Resident: Life in Labor and Delivery

A fictional adaptation. I am going to make this medical student cry. I don’t know how I know it, but somehow I can sense it. I know it the second she walks into the resident room on Labor and Delivery at Cadence Hospital, her perfect blond ponytail swinging behind her. And I’m certain of it when she holds her slim hand out to me and says, “Hi! I’m Caroline! I’m the new medical student!” No, I am not exaggerating those exclamation points. “I’m Emily,” I say. (Note the lack of exclamation points.) I stay in my seat, but I reach out to take her hand, which is as smooth as a baby’s bottom. And I’ve touched a lot of babies’ bottoms lately, considering I’m working on Labor and Delivery right now. “I’m a third year resident.” My co-resident and sometimes friend, Jill, who also happens to be the chief resident for OB/GYN, looks down at Caroline’s outstretched hand and shakes her head. She leaves Caroline hanging as she says, “I’m Dr. Brandt.” Actually, maybe Jill will make her cry. “I’m so excited to be here!” Caroline says, practically bouncing on the heels of her practical shoes. She’s wearing the requisite blue scrubs—if she weren’t, Jill would be chewing her out as we speak. “I’m really interested in women’s health.” “Do you want to do OB/GYN?” I ask her. Caroline...

How to Read an EKG: Med Student Edition

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