dr-fizzy

Dr. Fizzy

Freida McFadden is a midwestern physician who has finally finally finally come to the end of her grueling medical training, and at last she has enough time to publish the wealth of cartoons she's created over the years. If you enjoy them, please comment. If you don't enjoy them, then you can just keep your fool mouth shut. Read the rest at Doccartoon.blogspot.com, and make sure to check out her books, A Cartoon Guide To Becoming A Doctor, and The Devil You Know, on Amazon!

https://www.amazon.com/Cartoon-Guide-Becoming-Doctor/dp/1105091023

Personality Disorders Commonly Seen in Med Students

As medical students on psych rotations we are taught how to look for signs and symptoms of personality disorders. But, sometimes, the clearest signs are manifested in our own...

The 11 Types of Anatomy Lab Groups

Now this is the comic all about how your lab got flipped, turned upside down, and I’d like to take a minute just, sit right there, I’ll tell you why your lab partners keep giving you that glare: Check out more cartoons from Dr. Fizzy here.  ...

Dr. Orthochick: Help

I had a really bad call the other week of the variety where I couldn’t do anything right. And it was busy so I kept on having to double back because I was redoing a lot of stuff. Around 1 in the AM I got consulted for a guy with a finger infection. He had been bit by another person and some genius in the ER had sewed it up so that the infection brewed deep to the sutures and ravaged his pinky. I looked at it and he seemed to have infection diffusely–the whole finger was swollen and he couldn’t move it and he had erythema and lymph nodes tracking past his elbow. So I didn’t really feel like I could handle the situation on my own in the ER, and I say this as the chick who once washed out a septic wrist in the ER. (Disclaimer: Even at the time I knew that was a bad idea) The problem was, the hand surgeon on call that night was Dr. Ortho. I don’t like Dr. Ortho, he doesn’t like me, I spend a decent amount of time and effort trying to stay out of his way. So I really didn’t want to call him to tell him I needed help, but since the alternative was make a mess out of everything, I gritted my teeth and told...

Your Attending Is Pimping You, What Do You Do?!

Ah pimping, the most infamous of medical training traditions. If you’re a gunner, pimping is like someone asking you if you brush your teeth every day (you know the answer instantaneously (hopefully), but if you’re a normal human being, your stream of consciousness probably looks a little more like this: See more by Dr. Fizzy here....

What’s Inside Your White Coat?

Sure, on the day of your White Coat Ceremony you think your white coat will remain the spotless perfection that it is when it is slipped over your shoulders in front of your tearfully proud family… Soon enough, your realize that, inevitably, your beauty will turn up like this: See the original cartoon and more by Dr. Fizzy here....

Dear White Coat: It’s Not Me, It’s You

After diligently shrugging on my white coat for pretty much every single day throughout my entire residency, I abandoned my coat the minute I graduated. I haven’t worn one at all since I’ve been an attending. Here’s why:   1) No other physicians I work with wear a white coat, except for the weird ones… 2) They get dirty so easily. And of course, they show every speck of dirt because obviously they are white. Duh. My white coat from residency retired with a layer of indelible grime on the sleeves and hemline. I have to believe white coats are incredibly unsanitary. 3) If you are a female, you cannot pee while wearing a white coat. If you keep it on, you risk dipping it in the toilet. That is a fact. If you take it off, where are you supposed to put it? On the nonexistent hook on the stall door? On the floor?? 4) While it was nice having the pocket space, I think the sheer number of things I always kept in the pockets was contributing to neck pain. 5) The white coat does absolutely nothing to decrease the number of patients who call me “nurse”.   I do keep my white coat around, mostly in case the air-conditioner goes crazy and I need an extra layer of clothing. But I can’t really see going back...

Your First Week of Med School in a Nutshell

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