dr-fizzy

Dr. Fizzy

I'm a midwestern physician who has finally finally finally come to the end of my grueling medical training, and at last I have enough time to publish the wealth of cartoons I've created over the years. If you enjoy them, please comment. If you don't enjoy them, then you can just keep your fool mouth shut. Read the rest at Doccartoon.blogspot.com, and make sure to check out his book, A Cartoon Guide To Becoming A Doctor, on Amazon!

https://www.amazon.com/Cartoon-Guide-Becoming-Doctor/dp/1105091023

Why I Don’t Wear Scrubs

Some of the nurses at work were talking about a sale on scrubs.  I was listening in, because I only have one pair of scrubs that I wear on call and they’re awful.  The top is so big that it could be a dress on me. Nurse: “Actually, I’ve never seen you in scrubs, Dr. McFizz.  You never wear them!” They pointed out that a few of the other doctors do sometimes wear scrubs during 9-5 business hours, but some of us don’t.  Here’s why I don’t: When I was an intern, I worked at a county hospital, serving a very poor population.  Intern year is hard, and I wanted nothing more than to live my life in scrubs–basically, nonstop pajamas.  But our program director said to us, “You know, these patients may be very poor and not speak English, but they should be treated with respect. And that means they deserve a doctor who is well dressed.” Some of the other interns wore scrubs every day anyway, but I didn’t.  On non-call days, I wore “nice” clothes. Those words really stuck with me, even now, over ten years later.  I feel like it’s more respectful to dress in nice clothes when I see patients. You can find Dr. Fizzy’s newest book, The Devil You Know on Amazon. Read an excerpt here. She’s got a great job at a VA Hospital,...

The Devil You Know: A Day In The Doctor’s Office

An excerpt from Dr. Fizzy’s new book: The Devil You Know, available now! “Jason Burnham?” I call out. A man in his late twenties rises reluctantly to his feet. Damn, he’s handsome—he’s got a soldier’s solid build with firm muscles lining his arms and visible under his T-shirt. I can tell by the look on Mr. Burnham’s face that he isn’t terribly thrilled that I’m the one who’s going to be examining his testicles. I’m sure he’d prefer a male doctor. Still, I think it’s melodramatic the way he acts like a man being led to the electric chair as I take him to the newly cleaned examining room. “Mr. Burnham,” I say to him. “My name is Dr. McGill. Would you please change into a gown for me?” Jason Burnham nods miserably. Examining testicles is not my forte. I’ve gotten better at it since my patient population has become primarily male, but I’m nowhere near as good at that as I am at, say, finding the cervical os. Testicles just seem so… delicate. Obviously. But I’m getting better. As far as I can tell, the key to doing a good testicular exam is not accidentally saying something dirty during the exam, which is extra challenging when your patient is so damn attractive. I’m going to work on that today. I return to Mr. Burnham, who is now sitting miserably...

The Literal Price of Health Care

With all the dialogue on Obamacare, Trumpcare, the ACA, and the AHCA, Dr. Fizzy briefly reflects on the cost of health care.  Recently my daughter sprained her ankle. Because she’s a bit of a drama queen, I took her to urgent care after she refused to put weight on it for a day. The x-ray didn’t show a fracture and they gave her a crutch and an Aircast, which she used for exactly one day before she was better. A couple of months later, I got a bill for $150 for the crutch and Aircast that we barely used. Because of large deductibles and other reasons, we end up paying a lot of our outpatient healthcare expenses out of pocket. But the problem with that is that you have no idea what you’re going to pay until the bill actually arrives. If they had told me it was going to be $150 for that stuff, I never would’ve taken it. Think about how crazy it is. You would never go to a furniture store, buy a sofa, and just wait a few months until the bill comes to see how much you ended up paying for it. But that’s what I’m constantly doing with my healthcare bills. I can give multiple other examples. Recently, my own doctor ordered a lab test which I didn’t think was entirely necessary, but...

The HPI We’d Really Like to Write

The HPI We Write: Mr. Smith is a 65 year old man with a history of diabetes, prostate cancer, HTN, CHF, renal insufficiency who has had lower back pain since 1975. The pain is located over his right lumbar paraspinal muscles. Aggravating factors include walking, sitting, and lying down. The pain is alleviated with a medication prescribed by his PCP. He rates the pain as 10 out of 10 in intensity. He denies bowel or bladder symptoms. He underwent x-rays in the past that are currently unavailable. he has ever had physical therapy or undergone injections to his back.   The HPI We’d Really Like to Write: Mr. Smith is a 65 year old incredibly annoying man with a history of every freaking medical problem who has had lower back pain since before I was even born. The pain is located in this big area where the patient was waving his hand. Aggravating factors include everything, especially “talking to you.” The pain is alleviated by a medication that is “white and starts with an E.” He rats the pain as 15 out of 10 in intensity, despite repeatedly being told that 10 is the worst pain imaginable and he’s sitting there looking completely comfortable. He’s not sure if he has bowel or bladder symptoms, so he proceeded to tell me about every bowel movement he’s had in the last...

Personality Disorders Commonly Seen in Med Students

As medical students on psych rotations we are taught how to look for signs and symptoms of personality disorders. But, sometimes, the clearest signs are manifested in our own...

The 11 Types of Anatomy Lab Groups

Now this is the comic all about how your lab got flipped, turned upside down, and I’d like to take a minute just, sit right there, I’ll tell you why your lab partners keep giving you that glare: Check out more cartoons from Dr. Fizzy here.  ...

Dr. Orthochick: Help

I had a really bad call the other week of the variety where I couldn’t do anything right. And it was busy so I kept on having to double back because I was redoing a lot of stuff. Around 1 in the AM I got consulted for a guy with a finger infection. He had been bit by another person and some genius in the ER had sewed it up so that the infection brewed deep to the sutures and ravaged his pinky. I looked at it and he seemed to have infection diffusely–the whole finger was swollen and he couldn’t move it and he had erythema and lymph nodes tracking past his elbow. So I didn’t really feel like I could handle the situation on my own in the ER, and I say this as the chick who once washed out a septic wrist in the ER. (Disclaimer: Even at the time I knew that was a bad idea) The problem was, the hand surgeon on call that night was Dr. Ortho. I don’t like Dr. Ortho, he doesn’t like me, I spend a decent amount of time and effort trying to stay out of his way. So I really didn’t want to call him to tell him I needed help, but since the alternative was make a mess out of everything, I gritted my teeth and told...

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