dr-fizzy

Dr. Fizzy

Freida McFadden is a midwestern physician who has finally finally finally come to the end of her grueling medical training, and at last she has enough time to publish the wealth of cartoons she's created over the years. If you enjoy them, please comment. If you don't enjoy them, then you can just keep your fool mouth shut. Read the rest at Doccartoon.blogspot.com, and make sure to check out her books, A Cartoon Guide To Becoming A Doctor, and The Devil You Know, on Amazon!

https://www.amazon.com/Cartoon-Guide-Becoming-Doctor/dp/1105091023

The 8 Types of Medical School Professors

Going to medical school soon? Here’s a comic from Dr. Fizzy that will tell you just what type of medical school professors you will encounter, one way or another. They are all unavoidable and annoying, but at least they will help you get your medical degree, right? These are the types of medical school professors you will run across in medical school. The Enthusiast: will do your dissection for you but anatomy is not fun! Maybe he should drop the act… The Drone: he’ll allow you to catch up on sleep during class, but you’ll start to miss Powerpoint, even if he reads off it. The Party Animal: you will finally learn the effects of beer on kidney sections, but he will encourage you to drink beer under the table. Talk about peer pressure and second-hand drinking! The Comedian: she’s occasionally funny, but may cry if a pity laugh isn’t given. Might be insecure. The Sexist: great if you’re a female, but you may not be a female. Great if you’re a man, but may not be if you’re a woman. The Dummy: he’s easy at writing exams, but his board exam will be written by someone with actual medical knowledge. The Omniscient: kind of cool how he knows so much; however, the glass will shatter once you see the final exam. The Unmemorable: not memorably horrible and will make up most of...

Dr. Orthochick: Hip Dislocation

I was supposed to have a “research day” yesterday, which would have been really nice since Dr. Jewish emailed me to inform me that my whole “summary” section for my paper sucked and i had to redo it since it did not “emphasize the points of this paper or convince the orthopedic surgeon that this paper is in any way useful or relevant.” He also asked me if I wanted to help him with a project, which means I have 3 projects going and potentially 2 more starting soon. So yeah, a research day would have been nice and I would have actually used it to get research done, thankyouverymuch. As luck would have it, I had to cover a Dr. Grandpa case. It looked like a cool case, it was a hip replacement but the lady had a really deformed hip socket so it was going to be done a special way. The advantage to this is that it’s a cool case, the disadvantage is that I don’t get to do much. but I like hip replacements so OK, I’m cool with the whole thing. The surgery went fine and I ordered a postoperative xray to be done in the recovery room because that’s Dr. Grandpa’s MO. By that point it was around 10:30AM so I figured I could stick around and wait for the xray results and...

Why 4 Days Off A Month During Residency Isn’t Enough

During my Medicine rotations during med school and also during my Medicine intern year, we had four days off per month. I believe that’s the minimum that residencies are forced to provide. Maybe this makes me a delicate little snowflake, but I think 4 days off per month is nowhere near enough. Especially when the other 26-27 days of the month, you are waking up super early, leaving super late, and sometimes spending the night in the hospital. I remember one resident said she got a simple cold and it lasted for two months because she was so overworked that she couldn’t shake it. Is it any wonder residents are so burned out? There was one month during internship when I was feeling really depressed and burned out, and I was going into a stretch of working nearly two weeks nonstop with two overnights wedged in there. I asked my lovely (not) senior resident if there was any way I could have even a half day off in there. In retrospect, I’m embarrassed I asked because the answer was so obviously no. She let me have it: “If you get a day off, that means someone else has to cover for you!” The solution, in my mind, is that we need to train more physicians so the ones we have aren’t so overworked and miserable. Yet I doubt that...

Why I Didn’t Do Primary Care

My first residency was actually in a primary care program so this was obviously a field I was very interested in. But I aborted it. Why? 1) Partially it was a problem with my residency and probably a lot of residencies. Most internists who do primary care spend much of their residencies doing inpatient medicine, out of necessity. My “primary care residency” only different from general IM in that we got one month of primary care per year, which was a mix of clinic and urgent care. Enough to feel comfortable being a PCP? I felt it wasn’t. 2) I didn’t like the idea of having to know everything about everything, especially in a field where things are constantly changing and patients were getting more and more complicated. I felt like I’d have to be reading constantly just to stay current. 3) People would keep coming up with random complaints that I had no idea how to address, like, “My belly button feels cold.” 4) It felt like there was a push to see patients as quickly as possible, yet many of the patients were incredibly complicated. When an elderly patient hands you a bag of 30 bottles of medications and four of them are half-filled bottles of atenolol, just sorting through that alone takes like twenty minutes. I felt like I was being pushed to short-change my patients....

My Thoughts on Late-Term Abortions

I was recently talking to a friend of mine named Joe who works in health care and is an intelligent, well-educated person.  The subject of abortion came up and Joe told me he was pro-choice, but… Joe: “I just don’t think women should be allowed to have abortions at 37 or 38 weeks pregnant.  That’s just wrong.” I think I gasped audibly and said, “Oh no!”  I didn’t understand how a smart guy in healthcare could believe women were having abortions two weeks before delivery.  Or putting it another way, that there are doctors out there who are effectively willing to murder full term fetuses. Donald Trump said it during a debate though.  And while people did point out that this ridiculous, I always felt like a big enough deal wasn’t made out of this.  Our presidential candidate believed women are allowed to have abortions at full term.  How can we brush that off? I calmly tried to explain to Joe why this logic made no sense, and he quickly said, “I don’t want to talk about it anymore.”  And… that was the end of the discussion. Now I am someone who sympathizes with people who are genuinely pro-life.  I have female friends who believe life starts at conception, and can talk intelligently on the subject. I am willing to listen to anyone who does not just want to ban abortion...

Being a Doctor is Like Working in Customer Service

I feel like as a doctor, part of my job is customer service.  Because when I see inpatients, a lot of the time when I ask at the end of seeing them if there’s anything else I can do for them, they have a complaint about their call button taking too long to be answered, the food being bad, their roommate being too loud, etc.I try to handle the complaints best I can.  I never ignore them.  I say something like, “I’m so sorry that happened.  Let me see what I can do to fix it.” Then I tell them my plan, which involves anything from talking to the nursing supervisor about nursing issues or to the unit coordinator to get them a room change.  I can’t personally fix the problem, but at least I try to show I’m taking it seriously and addressing it. It’s made me a lot less tolerant of bad customer service. Recently, I got an email at 6PM from our leasing office, saying that tomorrow (a holiday when kids were off from school), they were doing repairs and our water would be shut off intermittently “after 8AM.”  I was horrified.  We didn’t even have a day’s notice of this!  I was going to be home with the kids all day and how can you do anything at home when you don’t know if you’re...

Why I Didn’t Do Family Medicine

Family Medicine might have been a better choice for me. I liked outpatient medicine much better than inpatient medicine. I like procedures, even pap smears. The hours are generally regular. Several people suggested family medicine as a good choice for me. Here’s why I decided against it: 1) Family medicine is very regional. In some parts of the country, many of the docs are family practitioners. In other parts of the country, there are few and they are not well respected. I trained in an area of the country where family medicine was not as common. Our family med sub-I was a disorganized joke. Almost all the people in my med school class who were interested in primary care did internal medicine or primary care residencies. Only a couple of people matched in Family Medicine. 2) I never wanted to deliver another baby for the rest of my life. 3) If I was overwhelmed by the idea of having to “know it all” in primary care, it’s even worse in family medicine, where you’re taking care of an even larger spectrum of patients. (Yes, you could restrict your practice, but you don’t always have that option.) 4) I worried that family med residency would be like a repeat of third year of med school, where you’re always in unfamiliar territory, always fumbling, and always the one who knows the...

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