david-eisenberg

David Eisenberg, "Almost" MD

David Eisenberg is a co-founder of “PreMD Tracker”, an app for pre-med student’s to help them stay organized, on track and guided throughout the competitive premed process. He is an MD candidate at The Commonwealth Medical College, class of 2018. David graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a major in Neuroscience and continues to pursue this interest. Outside of studying and the office, David enjoys mountain biking, tae kwon do, and traveling.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.eiron.premdapptracker

6 Things That Might Kill You in Rio

With just 4 days until the XXXI Olympic Games, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, there are many pressing issues that have yet to be resolved. If you are planning on traveling to Rio, you should definitely proceed with caution, as there are numerous health and safety risks that could kill you.   Mosquitoes   Yes, we have been dealing with these pests for centuries. Although mosquitoes may not be a new threat, they are a still a major threat to humans, as well as dogs and horses. Zika is the latest mosquito-borne disease that has been especially prominent in Central and South America. Pregnant women are at the highest risk, as Zika can cause severe birth defects in children, however anyone can become infected with the virus.   Furthermore, let’s not forget the cornucopia of other diseases that mosquitoes carry, such as malaria, yellow fever, dengue, West Nile Virus, and more. And, due to Brazil’s hot and humid climate, the mosquito population is much larger than other countries, increasing your risk of infection. All things considered, I’d stay away from Brazil for a while, pregnant or not!   Source   Water   Some of the most beloved sports in the Olympics— such as swimming, rowing, sailing, windsurfing—all have one major element in common: water. Alarming reports have confirmed that the water in Rio is much more contaminated than previously thought. According to the NY...

Chocolate Covered Medicine?

The Nestle We Know: Most of us associate Nestle with coffee and chocolate. Personally, I associate Nestle with amazing chocolate chip cookies that are great especially after a long study session. Nestle and the Health Sciences:  According to Reuters, apparently Nestle and health sciences have a lot more in common than I realized. Namely, a brand new $70 million research facility in New Jersey. This would also not be Nestle’s first investment into the health sciences either. They have also invested $65 million in Seres Therapeutics that researches the healthy bacteria in the GI tract and has signed a deal with a swiss based company that is developing diagnostic tests for Alzheimer’s. Reuters says that it could be a move on Nestle’s part to both quell concerns about “unhealthy” foods that they sell and also to branch out into new and lucrative healthcare markets.    PBS    What does this have to do with med school? As med students and future physicians, we are exposed to a lot of articles and information. Therefore, it is important for us to analyze this information and understand bias’ that might be present. Am I implying that health information from Nestle will be skewed? No, not necessarily. However, it is important to be aware of where information is coming from and be able to critically analyze it as well. Personally, I will be...

What is Organized Medicine Anyway?

  What is organized medicine and why does it matter? Organized medicine is when physicians join an organization in order to advocate for themselves and their patients. The American Medical Association (AMA) is a great example of this and an organization that I am a part of. In addition to the AMA, each state also has their own medical society, and since I attend school in Pennsylvania, I am a member of the Pennsylvania Medical Society (PA Med). Organized Medicine Groups are typically broken up into physician, young physician, resident, and medical student sections. Each group works together but also advocates for their own interests. A specific example of this is that students in the PA Medical Society all advocated for the society as a whole to fund sending one student from each school in the state to the AMA annual meeting. Having this kind of funding as a student is crucial since we all know that budgets are tight.   The Details: Organized medicine is what gives physicians and students a voice. It is what allows physicians to advocate for the best quality care for their patients while also ensuring that doctors are treated fairly on both a national, state and local level. Below are examples of different policies that organized medicine groups lobby for.   Fiscal Policy Examples: • Increase funding for residency slots • Reduce the cost of medical...

Interviewing From The Other Side

Of course in order to be accepted into medical school, you go through a long process consisting of applications, secondary applications, and interviews (not including all of the work you did as a pre-med). I remember going in for my interview and sitting down with a second year student for my student interview.   What did I think first? Well, at first I remember thinking, “Wow, this person really has their stuff together.” I am across a table looking at someone who not only got into medical school but also has been successfully completing their medical school curriculum as well. I remember seeing them as though they were some kind of superhero.   What did my first time being interviewed feel like? I was nervous, but having interviewed for other jobs and positions in the past I knew how important it was to “be myself”. And, I feel like I did that. I had a good conversation and I got to ask questions about the school as well as talk about my own personal interests. I remember feeling prepared since I went online to the school’s website before hand and read and learned everything that I could about the school’s mission and values, etc. Despite the fact that it went well and I ultimately did get accepted, I still couldn’t shake the nerves completely. You analyze and think about it...

Top Application Resource: MSAR

  The Best Resource for Comparing and Contrasting Medical Schools: MSAR – Medical School Admission Requirements   What is MSAR? Think of MSAR as the hotels.com of medical schools. This is a resource sold by the AAMC (cost: $25) and is incredibly valuable. I actually found the medical school I  currently attend, The Commonwealth Medical College, through MSAR. Of course we all think of the “brand name” medical schools when we go to apply. However, MSAR has information on all MD schools in the US and Canada. It has data on the average MCAT and GPA of matriculating students, percentage of students at the school who did research, those who have clinical experience, if research is required to graduate and how many students they accept from in-state versus out of state, just to name a few features.   Some Additional Features: One of the best features I thought, much like hotels.com or Expedia, was the ability to compare schools side by side. This helps to evaluate your competitiveness, as well as gauge where you might be the best fit. When I initially applied, I did not know which schools had more of a research focus and which had more of a clinical focus. MSAR helped me compare schools to look for my best fit. Also, knowing what percentage of students the school accepts from in-state or out-of-state is very helpful. You...

10 Insider Tips For Passing Anatomy Lab

  University of California Research   1. Talk to upperclassmen. This tip can be very helpful because they have already gone through exactly what you’re about to do. They can have some good insights into helpful study materials.   2. Attend reviews sessions held by upper classmen. Often times there will be outside of the classroom review sessions held by students who have, again, already gone through what you are doing. Use them in the lab as a resource, too.   3. Ask your librarian about free online anatomy study resources. Often times schools already have purchased subscriptions to online tutorials and learning tools, so be sure to take advantage of these.   4. Find out when you have access to the lab and go. There is no better way to learn anatomy than to be hands on. Remember, you will have a practical on the bodies you work on in the lab. So, you essentially have a great study guide in front of you.   5. Write down questions you have as you go along and follow up with your teachers. Your teachers are usually happy to help so be sure to take advantage of them as a learning tool.   6. Study with a group in the lab. Usually among a group of a few people one person will know the answer. Therefore, don’t feel left out...

Classes I Wish I Took Before Med School

Four Classes I Wish I Took Before Med School   Immunology I had probably about 5 hours total of immunology in undergrad. Needless to say, this was not enough. Until med school I did not realize that immunology played such a role in medicine. It seems obvious now, but before hand I thought that immunology was just the study of mostly autoimmune diseases like HIV. However, I quickly learned that I was wrong. A lot of med school actually focuses on the pathological and molecular levels of medicine. Therefore, immunology plays a role in just about everything you learn. Any disease or injury that needs healing involves, in some fashion, the immune system. Therefore, having a basic understanding of different immunological mechanisms and factors will be very helpful.   Histology I had about zero hours of histology before med school (I do not think that introduction to biology lab counts much here). However, I had a rude awakening in school when every exam I have had has involved a significant amount of histology and pathology. Now, a lot of the images are used to supplement the understanding of disease, but I am only now in my second year starting to understand how to look at and process these images. Looking at stains and microscope slides requires a lot more practice than I would have anticipated. Also, if you understand...

Page 1 of 5123...Last ›