tech

Nurse Nicole Uses Tinder to Publicize Men’s Health Month

June is Men’s Health Month and although men have higher death rates for all top 10 leading causes of death, it seems many are unaware of the need to take preventative health measures, such as visiting a doctor annually for a check-up. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, women are twice as likely as men to visit their doctor for an annual checkup, But no worries, Nurse Nicole is on a mission to help change this through the most unlikely of platforms: Tinder. Luring men to swipe right with her charm and undeniable good looks, Nurse Nicole soon reveals that she is more than just a pretty woman. Actually, she’s not a woman at all: “In honor of Men’s Health Month, two male advertising students, Vince Mak, 23, and Colby Spear, 24, of the Miami Ad School, created Nicole (yes, she’s fake) to urge men to get regular checkups,” The Huffington Post explains. “[They] chose Tinder because they know a lot of men in New York City use the app, and they thought it would be an effective way to educate them about a good cause” says Think Progress. Perhaps because Nurse Nicole is controlled by men, she responds very aptly to sleazy pick-up lines, turning any comment into an opportunity to help educate her matches on the need to get checked for anything from prostate cancer and...

5 Doctors You Should Be Following on Twitter

With Twitter’s IPO hitting the NYSE last week, it’s unmistakably clear how popular the social networking service has gotten since it’s 2006 inception. It’s used by a wide variety of individuals, from your everyday teenager tweeting on how hard life is to the drunken Iowa State college girl sending YOLO messages from jail. What you may not realize is that it’s a source for dispensing and receiving information on trending medical issues from reputable physician sources. Here are 5 physicians to follow on Twitter: #1 Kevin Pho: Internist and founder of KevinMD (www.kevinmd.com), Dr. Pho started blogging on his namesake website over 10 years ago to give the public an expert medical opinion on trending healthcare topics. Nowadays, over 1000 authors with various medical backgrounds contribute to his blog, which he continues to edit while maintain a full-time job as a primary care physician. His writings can also be found on CNN.com, USA Today, and the New York Times. Follow him on Twitter : @kevinmd. #2 Scott Weingart: An emergency department intensivist and associate Professor at Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine, Dr. Weingart specializes in ED care of the severely ill patient and strives to “bring upstairs care, downstairs”. He shares his knowledge with the interwebs via his blog, EMCRit.org, which garners >180,000 podcast downloads a month. Follow him on Twitter: @emcrit. #3 Oliver Sacks: Dr. Sacks is a British...

She Thought He Wasn’t Going to Make It Until a Pair of Google Glasses and Some Teamwork Saved the Day

As the lines between technology and medicine continue to blur and blend, the utility of wearable devices in clinical practice has never been higher. As we can see in the video, the ability for physicians, emergency response teams, and other health providers to cohesively assess and treat a patient is significantly augmented by the integration of Google Glass technology. Wearable Intelligence’s HIPAA-compliant platform wirelessly enables doctors, surgeons, and nurses to achieve greater efficiency, collaboration, and patient...

All the Eerie Glory of Human Cadavers. Without the Formaldehyde?!?

A new video from Slate shows the product of the latest collaboration between computer scientists and biologists at the University of Michigan. The Michigan Immersive Digital Experience Nexus, or MIDEN, “allows students to warp virtual human cadavers however they wish, pulling back flesh and segmenting bodies with the switch of the hand. The futuristic tool could prove essential to anatomy classes.” The possibilities for this type of training technology are...

Top 3 Coolest Medical Innovations of March

Here are the 3 latest innovations in medicine that will be sure to make a difference in clinical practices of the future: 1. Evoked Potential Assessment Device Prevents Arms and Legs from Falling Asleep During Surgery Often during surgery, arms or legs may be in positions for long periods of time. Nerves and blood vessels may be stretched and squeezed, and if a patient’s position is not adjusted in time, permanent tissue damage, compartment syndrome, and other risk factors may occur. SafeOp, a Maryland company has developed The Evoked Potential Assessment Device, which uses SSEPs (somatosensory evoked potentials) to detect abnormal nerve signaling that is indicative of poor patient positioning, to warn clinicians to reposition a patient in need.     Additional features include: – Wireless tablet control and display with wired backup – Real waveform data and graphical displays – Integrated neuromuscular junction testing including train of four, single simulation and post-tetanic count – Convenient easy clean, easy place headbox that can be rotated for supine or prone surgeries – Patent pending electro-cautery recognition and removal from averaged signals – Patent Pending distributed ground to reduce stimulus artifact – Single 6 layer board for durability and tight integration of functions – Simple and easy snap-on cable connection – Unified flat lying, fully shielded cables to minimize clutter and block out electrical interference – Easy place and connect surface electrodes...

3D-Printed Tracheal Splint Implant Saves This Baby’s Life

Born with Tetralogy of Fallot with absent pulmonary valve, a condition that leads to severe pulmonary regurgitation and dilation of pulmonary arteries, 18-month-old Garrett Peterson developed severe tracheobronchomalacia, leading to airway collapse and trouble breathing even on a ventilator. Using polycaprolactone, a biodegradable polyester, University of Michigan doctors and engineers worked together to 3-D print a biodegradable splint and implant it into the airway. Although doctors received FDA clearance to perform the surgery, the procedure itself has not received FDA approval. Garrett’s doctors hope that after the surgery, naturally occurring tissue will form over the splint, growing a fully functioning airway by the time the splint dissolves. For more on the 3D printing system that was used to print the tracheal splint watch the video...

How A Washing Machine Can Help Design a Safer ICU

Berg, the company the brought along fun internet-connected concepts and products such as the Little Printer released this interesting video recently. The amazing part of this is that Cloudwash is foundational and will just be built on. It shows where the current state of the Internet of Things is and where it can go in the future. What Berg did was amazing to me. It took a regular “dumb” appliance with software and electronics that were trapped in and made the interaction richer and its meaning and value richer. In a way, they radically changed the way I viewed how devices could be connected and created the possibility for a new class of devices in our daily lives. And in a way, I saw so many parallels to healthcare. In the video, Berg mentioned how the action of washing clothes can be quite complicated. There are baroque symbols on how clothes should be treated and this in turn is reflected by different sets of complicated icons on machines. Healthcare delivery can be far more complex though. “In any given hospital, as many as 15 medical devices, including monitors, ventilators and infusion pumps, are connected to an ICU patient, but because they are made by different companies, they don’t “talk” with one another. Patient-controlled analgesic pumps that deliver powerful narcotics, where a known side effect is respiratory depression, aren’t linked...