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INFOGRAPHIC: Film’s Most Frightening Medics

Halloween only comes once a year, but the scariest movies and tales of evil can stay with you long after the dusty decorations have been stowed. From the unthinkable evil acts of Dr. Hannibal Lector, the cannibal psychiatrist, to the misguided misdemeanors of Ernest Menville, the submissive plastic surgeon, the horror genre is littered with downright dangerous doctors. But, characters and crimes aside, why do we even watch horror movies in the first place? The side effects of such viewing in many people include a racing heart, perspiration, goosebumps and even nightmares, so why put ourselves through the mental anguish when we could be watching Scrubs? Dr Linnie Blake (not included in our list of evil doctors!), Head of the Manchester Centre for Gothic Studies at Manchester Metropolitan University in the UK, answers this question. “Horror cinema offers its audience rather more than squealy thrills. In focusing on what frightens us and pushing our endurance to the limit – though in a highly controlled and essentially safe manner, it opens a creaking door on the workings of the human mind and the cultural norms of our societies. “Horror may make us feel – the racing heart, the laughter of relief, the howl of disgust. It also makes us think – about outsiders and deviants, the monster and those made monstrous by the societies in which they live. It enables...

QUIZ: Learn To Stay In Shape With The Right Exercise Program

So, you’re thinking of getting into shape. There are plenty of options available ranging from the rush of competitive sports to the tranquillity of yoga. Not everything is going to be a perfect match for you and it’s best to do some research before you dive head first into a new fitness regime. Whatever your personality, it’s vitally important to keep fit and make sure you exercise regularly. This quiz will help you decide which type of physical activity is right for you. Find Your Ideal Exercise Match Group Activities You’re a competitive, spontaneous exercise machine. You thrive testing your abilities against others whether it be on the track or at the gym. Recommended Workouts: – Team Sports – Competitive Running – Martial Arts – Zumba – Spinning Solo Workouts You’re confident in your abilities and don’t mind being around others when working out but prefer to focus on your own development. Recommended Workouts: – Weight Training – Jogging – Mountain Biking – Skiing – Cardio Conditioning Calming Exercises You prefer to be alone when you exercise and predominantly use it as a way to decrease stress. The perfect work out is one that not only keeps you fit but also centres you. Recommended Workouts: – Yoga – Thai-Chi – Swimming – Cycling – Walking Do you like to be spontaneous? What is your biggest motivation to exercise? Would...

So, How Do I Stay Busy In Medical School?

Medical school is hard. There is no denying that hard-set fact. However, in order to make it through with your sanity still intact, you need to look outside the classroom. Here’s how to stay busy in medical school. The time you spend going through those basic science courses, organ systems, and patient cases is undoubtedly going to give you enough on your plate. However, I believe that it is a person’s interest beyond his or her core passion for learning the art of clinical practice that made them want to come to medical school. For most of us, it started when we took a hard look in the mirror and asked how we can make an impactful change in the world. You may have been someone who wanted to improve access to services and volunteered in the community or you might have worked at an HIV clinic to further detection and management of the ailment. For me, health literacy and public education was my calling. As I went through high school and college, I gradually and surely began to witness a huge divide in what health care providers can tell their patients. Be it through counseling or direct prescriptions, there often seemed to be a deficit in receiving that same guidance by the patients. Part of the reason was a lack of clear communication and consideration from the provider...

Three Med School Career Paths, and Their Alcoholic Drink Compliments

Modern Culture makes college out to be a never ending party filled with alcoholic beverages galore.  So if you’re a med student, here are three different career and the alcoholic drinks that compliment them.  Thoracic Heart Surgeon – Whiskey Neat Both the drink and the trade involve precision and a careful hand.  When pouring out the 50 year old shot of whiskey, that your surgeon budget can most definitely afford, you must have a careful unshaken hand as to not spill a single drop.  Just as when operating on a patient the thorax is not the place to be handling a knife with a trembling hand. Both can lead to tragic mishaps of spilt liquor and deceased patients.  Whiskey is a burning yet classy drink much like the fire that burns inside of the surgeon.  They stay locked into their work at all times and get the job done, but at the same time dressed down in full scrubs and gloves, make it look good too.  Yet the reason it is whiskey neat instead of on the rocks, is that the surgeon is straight up with his patients, they don’t have time to mess around or give false hope.  They’ll give you the diagnosis straight up, not watered down or with ice, just straight whiskey, making whiskey neat the official drink of the Thoracic Heart Surgeon.   Pediatrician –...

6 Books for Future Doctors to Read, Part 2

Medical students and aspiring health professionals may already read their fair share of literature, but check out these books for future doctors. Click here to check out Part 1! “Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic” by Sam Quinones The opioid epidemic is perhaps our greatest public health crisis. To put this in perspective, overdoses claim more lives in the U.S. annually than car accidents. As a doctor, you’ll very likely see patients who are struggling with addiction. In “Dreamland,” Sam Quinones humanizes these patients by depicting how powerful opioids lay claim on our nervous systems. Quinones also delves deep into the forces that have driven the epidemic, including pharmaceutical companies’ heavy reliance on barebones research to support the widespread usage of pain meds. “When Breath Becomes Air” by Paul Kalanithi Paul Kalanithi was an accomplished neurosurgery resident, well on his way to becoming a prominent surgeon-researcher. But, his life plans completely changed when he was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. In “When Breath Becomes Air,” Kalanithi examines the meaning of life when on the brink of death. Although Kalanithi passed away in 2015, his memory lives on with his beautifully written, insightful memoir. “Do No Harm: Stories of Life, Death, and Brain Surgery” by Henry Marsh In “Do No Harm,” Henry Marsh talks about his life as a neurosurgeon. Aspiring doctors will learn a ton from...

Should Nurses Date Doctors? 6 Reasons Why They Shouldn’t

Most nurses have seen the Grey’s Anatomy episode where Rose, the nurse, and Derek, the dreamy surgeon, take their relationship to the next level. But it’s not that simple. Nurses rarely sneak off to on-call rooms in the middle of a shift. In fact, hospital call rooms have very small, squeaky beds and very thin walls! Doctors used to marry nurses — it was a more common practice in previous generations. Now, nurses are choosing NOT to date doctors. Here’s a list of reasons why you may not want to either. 1. Nurses shouldn’t date doctors because they have crazy hours Typically, nurses enter into relationships with first year interns or residents. After all, most fellows or attending physicians are engaged or married. Interns are assigned quite possibly the worst schedule and on-call rotation in the hospital. So, a relationship can be tough. At a facility I’m familiar with, interns in the ICU and cardiology are on call every third day and cover one week of night call per month. Residents (second and third years) are on call every fourth night. My advice: avoid dating medical trainees. That is, unless you want to coordinate your crazy hours with those of the intern or resident. 2. Nurses shouldn’t date doctors because you get the looks, gossip, and questions When a nurse and a doctor date, it becomes everybody’s business. Coworkers feel invested in these relationships and...

Your Next Box of Mac & Cheese Could Be Your Last

Most of us enjoyed mac and cheese from the box as children and we loved it! All the non-nutritious goodness that was filled inside that little box was what we wanted daily. Looking back on my mac and cheese filled childhood, I get a feeling of regret and that is because a new study has revealed that mac and cheese from the box has a toxic chemical called phthalate. Phthalates are chemicals of high concern. They are used in the plastics industry and are found in rubber coatings, adhesives, sealants, and printing ink, but they are not directly added into food. However, through the food packaging process, phthalates can find their way into food products indirectly when they leave from food contact materials. This is a serious problem. Phthalates are dangerous to pregnant women and children because many studies have linked prenatal exposure to phthalates with birth defects in children. They are hormone-disrupting chemicals that have been shown to threaten the health development of babies’ endocrine and reproductive systems. In order to protect people’s health, the EU has banned most phthalates for plastics in contact with fatty foods. However, the US has not taken this type of action yet. Per a new study by The Coalition for Safer Food Processing & Packaging, the average phthalate levels found in macaroni and cheese powder were more than four times higher than in...

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