research

Study on Fist Bumping Could Literally Save Lives

“A short, sweet fist bump will transmit the least bacteria,” says British biochemist David Whitworth, a professor at Aberstwyth University-Ceredigion in the UK. A new study shows that handshakes transmit almost ten times the amount of bacteria than the short, sweet fist bump. The study looked at high fives too, which ranked in the middle, transmitting half the amount of bacteria as a handshake. Despite the study’s findings, most people aren’t as quick as we might hope to swap hand shaking for fist bumping. It seems to be catching on though… ABC News Dr. Whitworth suggests that the fist bump is more hygienic because of the limited skin contact and the tendency of its length to be much shorter than that of a handshake. Though Sheldon might not get it yet… Warner Bros.  Even Shawn and Corey knew what was up… Touchstone Television Featured Image: Flickr | Davis...

This 15-Year-Old Can Diagnose Pancreatic Cancer

Jack Andraka, recipient of the 2012 Gordon E. Moore Award, explains the process of developing a cheap, fast, and 100% accurate diagnostic test for pancreatic cancer. Drawing from lessons on antibodies from his high school biology class and research on carbon nanotubes, Jack developed a diagnostic strip that tests for mesothelin levels to determine whether a patient has early-stage pancreatic cancer. Read more about Jack Andraka. Filmed at FutureMed, in February 2013, at Singularity...

Scatological Study Says Smelling Farts Is Healthy

Flatulence may not be the most appealing to your olfactory senses, but it may benefit you in other ways, an article published by CNET says. According to a study conducted by the University of Exeter, flatulence contains certain compounds which drive energy production in blood vessel cells, contributing to the prevention or reversal of mitochondrial damage. Hydrogen sulfide, a compound that is naturally produced in the body, is also present in flatulence, and when smelled, plays a role in protecting mitochondria and warding off common ailments such as stroke, heart failure, diabetes, arthritis,dementia and aging. Read the article published by CNET. Read the study from the University of Exeter. – See more at:...

Can a Robotic Needle Safely Eliminate Blood Clots?

A new video from Scientific American introduces a new tool that may be able to treat patients with dangerous blood clot in the brain. Researchers at Vanderbilt University are perfecting a robotic needle that will suck blood clots free without harming healthy tissue around it. The technology will use steerable needles to penetrate the brain with minimal...

Calling All Nerds: We Are the Cool Kids Now

Remember those kids in middle/high school? The ones who wore belly shirts and rocked long beautiful hair? The ones who teased you for being a “nerd”? A new study shows, not only are they probably not amongst your med school classmates, they also may be suffering pretty long-term negative outcomes. NPR’s Shots blog reports that “kids who try to act cool in early adolescence are more likely to have problems with drugs and alcohol, and have trouble managing friendships as they grow older. And their popularity tends to fade by the time they’re 22.” In the study, published in Child Development, Researchers followed 180 individuals from age 13 to age 23. They administered questionnaires to the subjects themselves as well as to their parents and friends. At the end of the 10 year study, researchers found that subjects who were more “popular” during their youth were 45% more likely to report issues related to alcohol or substance abuse. In fact, “pseudomature behaviors,” behaviors reflecting a desire to achieve social maturity without a concomitant level of emotional and behavioral maturity,” during adolescence were “far and beyond” more predictive than adolescent deviant behavior in predicting deviant behavior later in life. Researchers call this “The High School Reunion Effect.” According to the experts, the effect may be caused because young children are increasingly being led to believe, by TV Shows, movies and music, that acting “older...

8 Women Who Beat the Medical Odds

Lizzie Velasquez Not only has Lizzie beat medical odds, but she’s overcome the unique cruelty of the internet: Google “World’s Ugliest Woman” and her picture pops up. But instead of firing back at internet trolls, Lizzie has taken the higher road and used the damnation to propel her into the inspiration stratosphere: she’s given a TED Talk, written a book and traveled far and wide as a motivational speaker. Not just in the hope to raise awareness around her unnamed disease, but as a defendant against bullying. Lizzie suffers from a disease that has no name, and only two people in the world are known to suffer from it. Lizzie’s body essentially stores no fat, so she has an emaciated appearance from lack of adipose tissue. Just to stay alive, she has to eat upwards of 5,000 calories a day. Though her condition is unknown, it’s similar to progeria, a disease of rapid cellular aging.   Jerri Nielsen Dr. Jerri Nielsen was a highly trained doctor who was hired to spend a year in Antarctica in 1998. She would serve as the only physician to the research scientists working at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. At the time, Dr. Nielsen was 46 years old and had extensive medical training. Having the opportunity to participate in “adventure medicine” was thrilling, if not also remotely terrifying. A few months into her work,...

How Can Oxygen Be Delivered Without the Lungs?

We hear about amazing innovations in medicine all the time: miracle drugs, the artificial heart, bionic contact lens. These ideas don’t pop up out of nowhere; many of them come from pressing need, accidents, and in certain cases, a situation of huge emotional impact. John Kheir, MD, discusses his journey to find a way to oxygenate blood without the use of lungs. Using microparticles injected with oxygen, Kheir and his team were able to keep rabbits with blocked windpipes alive for up to 15 minutes without a single breath. The technique has the potential to prevent cardiac arrest and brain injuries induced by oxygen deprivation.   Featured image is screenshot from video...