medschool

Learning Anatomy Through Painting on Human Body

Remember the Will Ferrell SNL skit “Sculpture Class”? Besides a good laugh, the skit might have also provided some inspiration to one medical school professor. Dr. Claudia Diaz, Professor of Anatomy at RMIT University, has incorporated art into her lessons by having students paint on a human body. She explains that having students paint the different tissues onto the body, they are learning through deep conditioning and changing their bad habits of memorizing textbook information. Watch the video to see how the body of student Zac O”Brien is transformed into an “Anatomical Man”, masterfully combining artistic inspiration and learning objectives.   Featured image is screenshot from video...

The Top 10 Pick Up Lines that Never Fail for Med Students

These pickup lines would surely work on a nerd like me. If not, at least they would make me smile 🙂 1. Did you cut my phrenic nerve? Cause I can’t breathe when I’m around you. 2. Baby, you are so sweet that even my GLUT 2 transporters are at Vmax. 3. Nice antibody. Wanna conjugate? 4. You must be stage 3 syphilis, cause I can’t get you out of my head. 5. If I were an enzyme, I’d be DNA Helicase so that I can unzip your genes. 6. Are you free tonight? I really need an anatomy partner. And if things go well, we can study physiology. And if they go really well, we can study embryology. 7. Hey baby, why don’t you get your ligase working on my okazaki fragment and lengthen my strand. 8. My zygomaticus muscle contracts everytime I see you. 9. If I was an endoplasmic reticulum, how would you want me: smooth or rough? 10. Do you have 11 protons? ‘Cause you’re So…dium fine! And two bonus ones, they were a little rated R, so I put them here: 11. Hey baby, why don’t you get your ligase working on my okazaki fragment and lengthen my strand? 12. My love for you is like diarrhea. I can’t hold it in! Featured Image: Flickr | Nikki...

3 Problems Doctors Face When Prescribing Medical Marijuana

Ziva D.Cooper, PhD, discusses the limitations doctors face when prescribing medical marijuana. Dr. Cooper explains that a lack of controlled studies and unknown risks to pulmonary health are the main concerns for many...

Surgery for Rare ‘Brainy’ Scalp Changes Man’s Life

Ramtin Kassir, MD, Plastic Surgeon, describes the symptoms of cutis verticis gyrata, or CVG, a condition in which the skin of the scalp starts resembling the folds of the brain. The condition is extremely rare, and the procedure to remove the folds is delicate in nature, due to the various factors and complexities involved with removing part of the...

15 Helpful Hints for New Residents

I was a general surgery residency program director for 24 years. I’ve seen them come and go. Here is some advice for those of you who are beginning residency training.   1. Never be afraid to say “I don’t know.”   2. Never be afraid to ask for help. Some of the worst disasters I have ever seen were because a resident didn’t want to bother a more senior resident or an attending and blundered badly.   3. Respect your colleagues and your patients.   4. Until you gain a great deal of confidence, do not manage things over the telephone.   5. A patient who is restless or anxious may be hypoxic. Make liberal use of the pulse oximeter. Do not sedate a restless patient without personally seeing him.   6. Sometimes postoperative abdominal pain is due to urinary bladder distension. Learn how to use the bladder scanner yourself. 50 mL of urine output could be overflow incontinence.   7. Trust, but verify. [Or better yet, at first trust no one.] For example if someone tells you a lab result, say thanks and look at all the lab results in the computer yourself. Many times the nurse will say, “The labs are normal” and later you will find that the serum CO2 was 15. 8. Listen to the nurses (if they seem to know their stuff). They can...

NEW: Doximity Residency Rankings

Doximity, the social network for physicians, has recently launched Residency Navigator, a new online tool that evaluates and ranks medical and surgical residency programs. Through a peer nomination process (view methodology), Residency Navigator is the first-ever national attempt to create a ranking system for programs that train future physicians. University of California, San Francisco and Johns Hopkins University came out as big winners in the process. UCSF placed in the top 10 for 16 specialties and Johns Hopkins placed in the top 10 for 14 specialties across the board. Sorting Through Residency Programs With the annual opening of ERAS on September 15th, Residency Navigator offers students a chance to generate a list of residency programs based on location, training preference, and fellowship placement.  From there, users can view specific programs for affiliated hospital sites, board pass rate, subspecialty percentage, alumni percentage, and percentile ranks for research. Since launching on September 10th, more than 20% of the 15,000 medical students on Doximity have already used the tool to view the data. Ranking the Best Programs In addition to shining light on residency programs, Doximity’s Residency Navigator is also the first nation-wide attempt at create a public formal ranking of training programs. Recent reports from both the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ) have recently issued calls for transparency into the performance of residency programs. This is the first time...

The 5 Best Classes to Prepare Yourself for Med School

It’s the beginning of a new school year and whether you’re a pre-med in undergrad, a post-bac student or a current applicant, it’s time to start thinking about important courses to take to prepare for medical school. Here are a few suggestions that I’ve had off current medical students who swear that these classes helped them to make it through their M1&M2 years unscathed. Anatomy & Physiology Becoming familiar in even the simple basics of the human body structure and function will be invaluable when you’re struggling through gross anatomy and trying to learn how to draw out the nerves of the brachial plexus, I promise.   Statistics/Epidemiology This may actually be a requirement for some of the schools you end up applying to so get it over with early and you won’t have to stress about taking it during the application cycle. Biochemistry Honestly, I feel like Biochem has a bad rap. I really enjoyed the class I took and I think the amount of misery inflicted by this subject is inversely proportional to how awesome your professor is. Choose wisely!   Humanities/Sociology It’s important to be well rounded as a student so you should take a few classes in the humanities or sociology that interest you. Even more important is the valuable practice you’ll get reading, condensing and summarizing large amounts of information. It might not seem...