medschool

ZDoggMD Drops Some Knowledge on the Pros and Cons of Medical Specialties

Featuring pediatrician Dr. Harry. Internal medicine, emergency medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and Justin Beiber…all in there,...

15 Steps to Rocking the USMLE I (And Celebrating Afterwards)

It’s a wonderful time of year. Birds are chirping, flowers are beginning to bloom, the weather outside is just perfect for bike rides and patio brunches, but you, my friend, are stuck inside making color-coded flashcards and learning the TCA cycle in preparation for step I. Relax, young medical Padawan. Fear not this beast of an exam and take some time to frolic amongst the daffodils. Here’s some advice from myself and other senior medical students on how to rock the heck out of this exam: Before the test: 1. Buy First Aid early. We’re talking first year, folks. While this may be too late if you’re currently signed up to take the exam, if you are just starting medical school, pick up a copy of First Aid. I’m not saying to all-out gun and read the entire thing within the first weekend of having it, but use it in conjunction with your block textbooks. It’s a good outline that won’t teach you concepts necessarily, but gives you a good idea of the topics you should really understand.  You should know this book inside and out. Also, don’t forget about the errata that is published online since the book does contain mistakes interspersed throughout. Just because it was written by a bunch of really smart people, doesn’t mean that they’re infallible humans! 2. Tailor when you begin studying according to...

5 Tips on How To Be A Gunner

Gunners get a lot of hate in the medical school community. It’s something I have never been able to completely understand, despite my obvious genius; however I have formulated a few theories as to why in the mean time. First, people are stupid. Second, the world is full of haters. Third, and most importantly, I’m the best. Regardless, the point is, being a gunner is amazing. You get to constantly feel better than everybody. Everybody likes you, despite rarely, if ever, showing it. And most importantly, you will probably get the best residency. So, how does one get to be a gunner? Well Gunnees and Gunnettes, I got a list that will help you be as awesome as me. 1. Raise your hand… a lot of the time. Did the professor just say something you know? Perfect. This is your opportunity to ask the perfect question. The perfect question allows you to take the material one step further, but most likely in a direction that doesn’t matter at all, and simply to show how smart you are. For instance, did they just talk about cardiac hypertrophy? Well, you should ask a hypothetical question about cardiac hypotrophy. Bam. Sure it is completely irrelevant. But, just say the opposite of whatever the guy said, use big words, insert pauses where you scratch your chin and furrow your brow to make it...

5 Endocrinology Pearls for the Internal Medicine Shelf and ABIM Board Exam

Endocrinology is an essential part of the Internal Medicine Medical Clerkship and ABIM Board exam. According to the ABIM exam blueprint, questions testing endocrinology topics comprise ~8% of the exam. Approximately ~5-10% of the NBME Clerkship exam is composed of endocrinology questions.   1. Don’t let thyroid nodules intimidate you. Check out the following post ABIM Exam Prep: How to Work Up a Thyroid Nodule This systematic approach will help you workup a thyroid nodule.   2. Workup of hirsutism is not as difficult as it seems. Follow this approach and you will be able to diagnose the cause of hirsutism. – Hirsutism is caused by either excessive testosterone or excessive 17-OH steroids (DHEA-S) production. – Excessive Testosterone production is seen in ovarian cancer or polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)Ovarian cancer: worked up with trans-vaginal ultrasound to look for adnexal mass. In addition, CA-125 marker is usually elevated in ovarian cancer. – PCOS: Amenorrhea, insulin resistance, and LH:FSH ratio of greater than equal to 3:1 – Excessive DHEA-S production is seen in congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), Cushing’s disease, or adrenal carcinoma – CAH: Usual cause is 21 beta hydroxylase deficiency, which is used to convert 17-OH progesterone to cortisol. Since this enzyme is deficient, 17-OH progesterone levels remain elevated. Decreased cortisol levels will cause an elevated ACTH level through a negative feedback mechanism. With increased ACTH, hyperpigmentation will also occur. – Cushing’s...

5 Lessons From Medical Student Entrepreneurs

“You have an idea and the company becomes the oxygen for that idea. In these times, a company is the best way to spread that idea” – Jack Dorsey, co-founder of Twitter  Would you take a year off from medical school to launch a startup? For many medical students, the idea of running a business as a doctor, let alone as a student, is a terrifying thought. We are trained in pathology and best-practice guidelines, not spreadsheets and business plans. A group of trailblazing medical student entrepreneurs, however, are breaking the traditional medical career mold. I recently interviewed four entrepreneurs who took time off from medical school in order to run a startup. Each at different parts of the startup process, they had lots to say about the steps leading up to their companies, juggling coursework and running a business, deciding to take time-off from school, and how they thought residencies would view them. The interviewees included: Adeel Yang of Picmonic Shiv Gaglani and Ryan Haynes of Osmosis Craig Monsen of Symcat   1. Launching a startup takes more than a great idea A common misconception about starting a company is that the key to success lies in just finding a great idea. The backgrounds of these medical students shows otherwise. Yang worked for a venture capital firm where he met with entrepreneurs and reviewed business plans, Monsen used his...

Know these 7 Vaccinations for the Boards and Shelf Exams, No Matter What Jenny McCarthy Says

While most of the ABIM Examination topics fall neatly into organ system categories, not all of them fit into this schematic. These include: primary care screening guidelines, substance abuse, vaccinations, etc. Here at Knowmedge, we’ve incorporated this important group of subject areas into General Internal Medicine, similar to the American College of Physicians’ Internal Medicine In-Training Exam Blueprint. Earlier this week, we reviewed the 5 key eye diseases seen on the ABIM board and NBME shelf exams. Today we explore the high-yield topic of vaccinations.   A comprehensive adult immunization schedule, by Vaccine and Age Group, can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website (unlike other preventive health measures, vaccination guidelines are not released by the USPSTF). Fortunately, you don’t need to memorize the entire CDC chart. Instead, for the ACP Internal Medicine in-training exam, ABIM boards and NBME shelf exam, focus on these 7 vaccinations:  1. Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis (Tdap) – Administer Tdap to all adults who have not previously received Tdap or whose vaccination status is unknown. – Boost with Td every 10 yrs.   2. Influenza – All individuals age 6 months and older should be vaccinated yearly since the targeted influenza strains changes on a yearly basis.   3. Herpes zoster (Shingles) – Adults 60 years of age and older should receive a single dose of the zoster vaccine. This is regardless of whether the patient has had...

Best of the Best: Our 6 Favorite Tweets From Match Week

Match Day is just a day away! While this day causes many 4th year med students an almost unbearable about of anxiety, let’s not forget that it is also a very exciting and rewarding time! We’ve had our eyes out for the best tweets of Match Week to share and celebrate the success of all M4s. Good luck!!   1. I feel like you can’t look at this picture and without feeling happy and excited. We truly enjoy seeing smiling faces for dreams made a reality!   2. As difficult as it is sometimes, following your dreams wholeheartedly will be worth it.   3. It’s always nice to hear someone who has already been in your shoes explain that going into medicine brought them happiness. I think that hearing these words of encouragement during times of great stress and uncertainty is reassuring and reminds med students of how fortunate they are to have reached their goals.   4. Awesome to see so many med students who’ve likely been through the rough times together now with huge smiles and enjoying each other’s success. For me, this demonstrates the importance of collaborating and building relationships in med school. Gotta have people by your side for the good times and the bad!   5. Not only is Match Day exciting for the M4s who match, but also for their friends and family....