medschool

Best Approaches to Radiology Personal Statement Writing

A radiology personal statement has a unique approach. There are some people who believe that a personal statement is not necessary in a radiology application. I don’t believe that it could hurt an application. If you are at that space where you want to write a killer personal statement, it is completely possible. With any big task that you take on, you need to plan properly. A personal statement is a reflection of who you are and what you have achieved. There are some approaches you can take to make the process streamlined and break the task up into smaller sections. It is important to cover all of the needed areas in your radiology personal statement, but also go a little further. When you break a large task up into smaller tasks, you can focus on one section at a time. We are going to break it up in this article to give you a better understanding of how exactly to approach each section. Radiology Personal Statement, Section 1 It is a rule in writing that your opening line has to be the winning line. This is where you are going to hook the readers. With a personal statement, you need to take the same approach. Leave the radiology jokes for another day. The way you begin your article is going to determine your success. Always keep in mind...

Step-By-Step Method to Study for Rotations in Medical School

Are you a clinical student and still not sure how to study for rotations in medical school? Are you coming home most evenings too tired to study? Do you lack the motivation to do more UWORLD questions? How should a student study for rotations in medical school anyway? In this post, I break down the steps to help you study for rotations in medical school. These are the strategies I’ve used to achieve honors on my rotations.  At the end, I also break down step by step how I use my study resources and text to study for the shelf exams using my notebook method.  If you prefer this post in a video form, check out the YouTube video and also check out the channel! Pick Your Study Resources Of Choice: Every rotation will have their recommended selection of resources. I’ve written detail posts about each rotation I’ve completed thus far. Click a particular rotation below to receive specific advice and resources. Internal Medicine Pediatrics Family Medicine Surgery Neurology Ob/Gyn Medical students become stressed by having too many choices. Often, especially early in their clinical years, students will try to use a little bit of everything. I was one of them. But trust those who have done it before you (such as myself) and stuck to no more than 2-3 resources. Often this will include one question bank (almost always UWORLD), a...

The Numbers Game: What Scoring a 260 on USMLE Step 1 Really Means

I have been putting off the writing of this post for a while. I’m not sure why. I guess I wasn’t sure how to say anything genuine that would convince you guys that you shouldn’t be hard on yourself for falling short of the lofty goals that you set for yourself before beginning the arduous process of studying for the USMLE Step 1. Perhaps it’s because I was in your shoes once, and no amount of reason could penetrate my longing for that perfect score, the one that I believed would either complete my application to dermatology residency (and therefore complete me), or dash my chances at my dream job against the harsh rocky shores of reality. I’m currently on the residency interview trail, and I am gratefully tired from having not been home to New York for five weeks. At a chicken and waffles brunch in Dallas, Texas, yesterday (NOMS!), I was reunited with one of my best friends from medical school. He and I spoke more frequently during the USMLE Step 1 period than I spoke with anyone else. I remember visiting his room periodically to mutually vent about the ridiculous nature of the beast that left us sitting in chairs inside small, quiet rooms for 12 hours a day. He would complain about the hours and remark with surprised candor about how poorly he was performing on his USMLE...

How to Distinguish Yourself the Residency Letter of Intent

A residency letter of intent can be a challenge, but not impossible. If you attack this mountain of a task in an organized manner, you can get it done. You want to avoid writing a letter of intent that comes across as generic. There needs to be some feel to it and allow the reader of the letter to get to know you. Don’t believe that your achievements are borderline and sell yourself short. Everything that you have achieved came with hard work and this is just another step towards your end goal. Take time to write your residency letter of intent because it is a valuable piece. This letter can determine the outcome of your acceptance. A lot of people wait until they basically run out of time and then just rush through it. This is when you write a generic version. If you want to stand out amongst the masses, apply these tips. Brainstorm before you start No one ever said that brainstorming is a waste of time and you should apply it to your letter of intent. Really take some time to think about what distinguishes you from those who are applying as well. Write down your strengths and weaknesses. Now establish which of these you are going to include in your letter of intent. The time spent on this brainstorming session won’t be wasted. Instead,...

6 Books for Future Doctors to Read, Part 2

Medical students and aspiring health professionals may already read their fair share of literature, but check out these books for future doctors. Click here to check out Part 1! “Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic” by Sam Quinones The opioid epidemic is perhaps our greatest public health crisis. To put this in perspective, overdoses claim more lives in the U.S. annually than car accidents. As a doctor, you’ll very likely see patients who are struggling with addiction. In “Dreamland,” Sam Quinones humanizes these patients by depicting how powerful opioids lay claim on our nervous systems. Quinones also delves deep into the forces that have driven the epidemic, including pharmaceutical companies’ heavy reliance on barebones research to support the widespread usage of pain meds. “When Breath Becomes Air” by Paul Kalanithi Paul Kalanithi was an accomplished neurosurgery resident, well on his way to becoming a prominent surgeon-researcher. But, his life plans completely changed when he was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. In “When Breath Becomes Air,” Kalanithi examines the meaning of life when on the brink of death. Although Kalanithi passed away in 2015, his memory lives on with his beautifully written, insightful memoir. “Do No Harm: Stories of Life, Death, and Brain Surgery” by Henry Marsh In “Do No Harm,” Henry Marsh talks about his life as a neurosurgeon. Aspiring doctors will learn a ton from...

Rheumatology Personal Statement Writing for Foreign Medical Applicants

Writing a personal statement for an application in another country brings on its own set of challenges. This is not something new and a lot of students had to master the art of doing so. It does not make it any easier, but there are some steps you can take to overcome this challenge. Every country has its own procedures and application criteria. Before you start writing your personal statement, you want to study the information of the set country’s personal statement rules. Do not assume that you can do it in the same fashion as you would in your home country. One would believe when it comes to medicine, the rules should remain unchanged. The reason behind the different set of rules is that every country faces its own challenges and needs. When you adhere to this understanding, it becomes easier to master. If I think about rheumatology personal statement writing, the information will be similar, but the format and application thereof will differ. Here are some of the best tips to write a rheumatology personal statement and come out on top. Copy Carefully It is easy to find personal statement samples online for any career, but you want to be careful with that one. You could just copy a sample rheumatology personal statement, but it is going to cost you a lot. Even if you are applying...

Why Sharing Your Medical School Story is Important

This semester, as I endure the long but exciting application process to medical school, I’m taking an upper-level English writing class that is appropriately titled “Writing in the Community.” This course is designed to liberate stories, both within ourselves and within our community. My community placement choice is with Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital, and I hope to have the honor of connecting with pediatric cancer patients to share their stories and give a voice to their fears, joys, worries, and smiles. I think there is immense power in telling stories, especially as I peer into my future career where I will meet people daily that have interesting and important stories to share. One of the reasons I chose to become a physician is to meet people from every background and every situation and get down and dirty with them in their biggest fears, mistakes, worries, and concerns. To get to this point, though, I must be able to effectively share my story and even more importantly, listen to someone else’s story. In a society that is fogged up with noise from ourselves, social media, and a busy schedule, taking the time to stop and listen is an often-neglected skill. In this class, I’ve learned that to tell someone else’s meaningful, honest story, I have to tell mine. Everyone has a story to share, even if it is buried under layers...