medschool

Is It Time Yet To Redefine Medical Education?

The ins and outs of medical education are hard to imagine as an outsider to the field. However, once you are in it, it’s a rabbit hole with not escape. Even as a lowly first year medical student, I am often embroiled in engaging articles or scintillating conversations about the state of medical education. What have we done that has worked well in the past? Is it working at its optimal capacity right now? What kind of scope do we have to improve it for our future generations of doctors? From the times of apprenticeship as the primary way of learning the art of medicine to the current paradigms of systematized education by the 2+2 model (2 years of basic science education followed by 2 years of clinical education), we have definitely come a long way. However, like everything in the world, the new establishment comes with its own set of drawbacks. While I am engaged in the day and night struggle to ingrain those molecular biomarkers of immunology or those atypical antipsychotics commonly prescribed for schizophrenia, the context of it all often seems out of reach. I constantly question myself: How does this all apply to a patient? This imagination process is often unfortunately left to the individual student, pending future patient contact in 2 years time. So what can really be done to improve the current setup...

Why I Didn’t Do Neurology

Neurology was my last rotation of my third year of med school, and you guys, I Loved It. I found it so fascinating that for the first time ever, I didn’t mind staying long hours at the hospital. When I did the consult service, it was like solving little puzzles all day. And the residents and attendings were my favorites… I fit so well with them (being Nerdy McNerderson and all). So why didn’t I do neurology? I could list reasons, but there was one big reason that pretty much explained everything: In the area of the country where I wanted to live to be near my husband, there were a total of eight neurology spots. Four of them were at a highly malignant program. And I felt that I wasn’t competitive enough to win one of four spots in a very desirable region of the country where I had zero connections. So I didn’t bother to try. That said, here are the reasons I’m glad I didn’t do neurology: 1) The job market is tight right now in neurology. 2) Not much in the way of procedures if you don’t do a fellowship. 3) I think neurologists are much better at diagnosing than treating, especially in the area of stroke. I’m not impressed with the medications prescribed by neurologists. A neurologist friend of mine is convinced that neurontin...

Choosing a Medical Speciality Based on Your Personality

When people ask me what I want to be when I grow up, I tell them I’m going to be a doctor. Then, I have a mini-existential crisis when I realize I’m 22 years old and almost a full-blown “grown-up.” Usually, after that, they ask me what kind of doctor I want to be. And then I have another crisis because I don’t really know what I’m going to specialize in. Sure, there are certain specialties that I’m drawn to. But, isn’t it too early to tell? And, how am I really supposed to know, considering there’s so many specialties to choose from? I know, I know, there’s really no need for me to panic. It’s not until your third year of medical school that you actually start rotations, so there’s plenty of time to find the specialty that suits you. But, regardless, I’m still very fascinated by what speciality I’ll end up in, and I often day-dream about the types of illnesses I’ll be treating as a physician. I’ve asked the doctors I shadowed about what drew them to their specific specialty. One of the answers that really stood out to me was that each speciality has a certain personality type—you’re often drawn to a specific speciality based on whether you possess its distinct personality. It turns out many people use this personality-specialty match to figure out what specialty would...

Does It Sometimes Feel Like I’m Married To Medicine?

There’s so much love in the air this month. Every time I’m on Facebook, I see an engagement announcement. Despite being in a relationship myself, the longest commitment I have had is not with an individual. It’s with medicine. At this point, it would be appropriate to change my relationship status to: married to medicine. I have been loyal to medicine since I was 15. And I’m almost 30. That’s 15 years of pure devotion. I don’t even have the time to be fickle-hearted. Long before I took The Hippocratic Oath on my white coat ceremony, I said my vows to medicine. I didn’t realize at the time but when I declared a pre-medical academic track, my heart whispered to medicine: from this day forward, for better, for worse, for richer, or poorer, in sickness and in health, until death do us part. I guess my acceptance letter was medicine telling me it loves me, too. On Valentine’s Day this year, I spent 12 hours at school during the day (from 7 AM – 7 PM) and less than 5 hours with my boyfriend. During dinner, I even felt guilty for not studying for an upcoming exam. I work my absolute hardest and concentrate fully on this one relationship to the exclusion of all others. I would love to have some flexibility and freedom to devote to other people...

Here’s How To Study Less And Get Better Grades

Do you want to know how to study in medical school? Interested in knowing how you can study efficiently medical school? More importantly, how do we study less by studying actively in medical school? What study methods help you study less and make higher grades? Keep reading to learn how! Now notice how I said methods instead of method. The truth is different study techniques in medical school will work for different people, but a single person may use many different types of techniques. You must identify which methods will get you the best results with the least amount of time. In this post, I’ve included suggested ways to enhance the effectiveness of commonly used study techniques in medical school. After reading this post you will know many the ways on how to study in medical school. If you prefer a video format then check out my YouTube Video below and my the channel here! This is the first of many to come so be sure to subscribe for weekly videos. Passive vs. Active Studying in Medical School You will hear a lot about passive vs active learning in medical school. If you’re not familiar, passive studying refers to strategies such as reading the syllabus, glancing at the slides, copying your notes verbatim, etc. Active learning, however, includes methods such as practice questions, flashcards, asking questions, and explaining concepts to your peers. While it may seem obvious which method...

The Difference Between Pre-Med and Pre-Dental

Your position on the application waitlist seems to be moving at a glacial pace. And official application decisions begin to trickle in for another group of budding health professionals. Given the abysmal reality of the uncertain application cycle, it becomes easy to develop the “I’ll go anywhere as long as I’m a doctor” mentality. Often students interested in becoming a doctor apply to multiple medical programs (both DO and MD) as well as pre-dental programs with little reflection on how the training and the career trajectory differs. While there is subtle difference between DO and MD program, there is an unmistakable difference between becoming a doctor and becoming a dentist. Students who find themselves in this predicament – choosing what kind of doctor they wish to become – should not make this decision with a fickle heart. As a college student, I remember standing at a career crossroads and genuinely conflicted between choosing medicine and dentistry. I was fiercely passionate about emergency medicine and working as a physician in level 1 trauma center. I was also fired up about medical journalism and so medicine seemed like the best option, allowing me to intertwine two passions into a career. But, the lifestyle and compensation of a dentist was undeniably appealing. Looking back, my rationale for choosing one career over the other was entirely superficial. I wish I was more contemplative...

How To Write A Nursing Resume That Will Get You Hired

When trying to figure out how to write a nursing resume, it’s important to keep in mind your primary goal: show all of your experience and education to set yourself apart and entice hiring managers to call you for an interview. But this focus on getting hired doesn’t mean that once you land a job you should forget about your resume until you start looking again. Instead, as the nursing resume samples show below, your resume is a living document that you should continuously update. Once you understand the basic elements and common mistakes, you can look for ways to improve it, whether by earning an advanced degree, volunteering, or by joining professional organizations. Nursing Resume Basics There are 4 key areas that must be covered when writing your nursing resume. Locations you’ve worked Where you studied and degrees earned Your clinical rotations and how many hours you worked in each Your placements in school Normally, the details of each are included in the nine elements of how to write a nursing resume, listed below. #1: Contact Information Your nursing resume should have all of your contact information front and center. After all, you want your potential employer to be able to easily contact you. Some essential contact information includes: Name Address Phone number Email You should also include any information that can help you stand out from other...