medschool

Top Resources I Used for the OB-GYN Rotation

So many babies and contraception! This sums up my OB-GYN experience. In this post, we will take a few minutes away from labor and IUDs and discuss the top resources for the OB-GYN rotation! UWISE (A): I never thought I’d find a question bank I liked as much as UWORLD. But UWISE for the OB-GYN rotation is it. UWISE is an online module which has over 600 questions. The best part of UWISE is the questions are split into their respective sections. The sections are each 10 questions. You can thus do 10 questions on contraception, another 10 on post-term labor, and finally 10 on post-menopausal bleeding. This allows your studying to be very focused. The questions are overall well written and high-yield information. The only caveat I would give is the explanations are at times hard to decipher on which answer choice is correct. But otherwise, the question bank is solid. I highly recommend you schedule in time to complete them all. If you can’t get access to UWISE then try out this Anki cards which cover the topics. Full disclaimer I didn’t know of these during my rotation! Hope they help! At the end of your rotation, it would be helpful to do the random 50 or 100 question tests. They do reuse the questions from each section, but I found them helpful as a final review before my shelf. Case Files for...

What Does It Mean To Be Successful Outside of Academics?

When I was young and naïve at the beginning of my medical training, I defined success and accomplishment quantitatively – class rank, GPA, exam results. Getting an A meant I was successful and getting any other grade else meant I was not. As students, we are constantly overwhelmed with people telling us how to attain “success.” Following someone else’s expectations can be destructive and counterproductive to your personal goals. One year later, how I came to define succes achievement is entirely personal. Defining what success means to me is important to be able to groom myself as a young doctor. Measurements defined by others are no longer significant to me. And I am not concerned about my grades as long as I am passing. But, even when I fail, I never feel bad about it anymore. Instead, I congratulate myself on trying my best and try to learn from my mistake. I no longer abide by other’s ideas of success imposed on me. And I most definitely don’t compare myself with other classmates. By defining my own standards that I want to live up to, I have actually created higher standards for myself as a person. My life does not revolve around school; it is simply one aspect of my life over all. Previously, success meant doing good in school to the exclusion of all else because that was an...

Here’s What To Do If You Fail The USMLE Step 2 CK

If you recently found out that you’ve failed USMLE Step 2 CK and are wondering, “What next?”, start by taking a deep breath and trying to calm down. MANY people have failed Step 1 and/or 2 and the majority of those people went on to finish medical school, match into residency, and become very successful practicing physicians. Focus on getting yourself back on track, addressing what went wrong the first time, and making a plan to put yourself in the best possible position for success on the second attempt. Not sure where to begin? Use these five tips: Examine Your Score Report Did you fail by a few points or a lot? What were your strengths and weaknesses? These are going to be important questions to ask as you try to determine when to retake your test and how to go about making a study schedule. If you failed by only a few points, you’ll probably need less time to study than if you failed by a significant amount (though you don’t want to rush back into things). Also, if you were weak in only one or two particular subjects, you’ll have an easier route to improvement than someone who was weak across the board. Regardless, start by taking an honest assessment of where things went wrong and prepare to make the necessary changes to improve your knowledge in...

These Are Five Movies Every Medical Student Can Relate To

Studying medicine is an enormous challenge; it takes more time, dedication, and willpower than almost any other type of academic degree. As such, medical students are often in need of inspiration to drive them to their ultimate goal – and whether you’re specializing in general medicine, psychiatric medicine, orthopedics or even just want to draw inspiration when writing an application to med school, you’ve reached the right place. The world of cinema is a rich seam for medics to mine for inspiration. Although medicine has been the basis for plenty of horror movies (the early Italian horror ‘Eyes Without A Face’ is a particular favorite), it has also brought us several tear-jerkers, emotional journeys, and genuinely astonishing films along the way too. We’ve put together five movies every medical student can relate to. We strongly encourage watching them in their precious downtime… get the popcorn ready, check these flicks out, and remember why you started this incredible journey in the first place. 1) Awakenings (1990, USA), IMDB – 7,8 This movie – starring the inimitable Robin Williams and Robert de Niro – is undoubtedly one of the most admired and widely-loved medical movies in the canon. Based on the fantastic memoir by Oliver Sacks, whose writings have inspired medical students for decades, it tells the story Dr. William Sayer, and his discoveries in the study of encephalitis lethargica – otherwise known as...

This Year’s Match Week Broke The Record Books

Match Week has always been a stressful time for medical students looking for their next big break — after all, why would this many people put in countless hours of studying, volunteer work, and resume building in the medical field if you didn’t think it was for you? Many apply, yet few get in. Last year’s Match Week broke a number of records, but this year broke the ceiling. We break down the numbers and see why we received the most Match registrants in history, and which specialties they matched on. Match Week, By The Numbers 37,103 applicants submitted program choices for 33,167 positions. The number of available first-year (PGY-1) positions rose to 30,232, an increase of 1,383 over 2017. The number of Match registrants was the highest ever at 43,909. The increase was due primarily to students/graduates of U.S. osteopathic medical schools, whose numbers grew by 1,054 over 2017 to 6,054 this year. Seniors Lead The Way In Match Week Every student, regardless of year or experience, wants to get the match. Despite the heavy competition, seniors were able to fill the most positions. According the NRMP, U.S. allopathic seniors filled more than 90% of most positions, mostly in Integrated Interventional Radiology (95.5%), Orthopedic Surgery (93.1%), Integrated Plastic Surgery (92.9%), Radiation Oncology (91.5%), Neurological Surgery (90.2%), and Otolaryngology (90.2%). Specialties with more than 30 positions that filled less than 45 percent with U.S....

5 Things You Need To Get Into Medical School

How do you get into medical school? Below I will go over the top 5 things that everyone medical school applicant should have on their application.   1. A Legitimate “Why” I’m not just talking about your personal statement. To get into medical school, your “why” should be all throughout your application. In reality, not one medical student has only one reason to become a doctor. We’re influenced by a variety of experience to pursue medicine. So the real question is, what are your “whys”? If you first, second, and third answers are “I want to help people”, try again. Everyone wants to help people. You can become a stockbroker and “help people” become rich (or try to). But do you also want to become a stockbroker? Of course, you don’t. (Maybe you do) What is it about becoming a physician that attracts you? Is it the leadership? Is it the lifelong learning? Is it the privilege to work with sick patients and their families? Once you come up with you “whys”, try to convince yourself.  Do you believe it when you hear yourself saying “I want to become a doctor because of X, Y, and Z”? Are those reasons truly your “whys”? Only you will know. 2. Shadowing Experience: Too often students try to get into medical school with limited shadowing experience. You can’t just shadow a doctor once or twice and make a life...

Internal Medicine Rotation Resources I Used To Receive Honors

In my post, I laid out my top tips to honor your internal medicine rotation. In this post I’ll walk through each resource I used to score well on the shelf and ultimately receive honors in the internal medicine rotation! Once you pick your resources, check out my study schedule on how to study for the internal medicine shelf.  Internal medicine covers a lot of material so no time to waste. Let’s get to it. UWORLD: (A+) This is the granddaddy of them all. You’ll use UWORLD for almost all of your rotation. But UWORLD for the internal medicine rotation is a must. You can argue, in fact,  it’s all you need. The question bank has over 1400 questions! You’ll be well prepared for the rotation and the shelf if you complete them all. How is it even possible to fit 1400 questions into a busy internal medicine rotation? It’s challenging but doable. My next post about the internal medicine will break down exactly how I studied during my clerkship. I’ll include a week by week breakdown and how I used all the resources. Spoiler alert, expect to do at least 40 questions every day. Some days will be easier than others, but that’s the blunt truth of how to get through them all. After completing UWORLD 1.25 x, I had little anxiety before the test. Make this question bank a...