medschool

Here’s A Resource I Used To Raise My Step 2 Score By 15 Points

In this post, we’re going to do something that’s really popular on the blog which is going over one of my top recommended resources. This resource has really helped me raise my Step 2 score by 25 points from my Step 1. It also raised my Step 2 score by 15 points over my goal score! What’s that resource? Dum roll… OnlineMedEd! In this post, I’m going to give a full OnlineMedEd review and insight into how I used it to study for shelf exams and my Step 2 CK exam! I know a lot of you guys know about OnlineMedEd and for the few of you don’t, I hope you stick around the whole post just to understand what this resource can offer you. For those of you guys that are familiar with OnlineMedEd, stick around because I’m going to go over how I used it to do well in my rotations, how I used it to do well on my Step 2 exam and  I’ll provide you guys a discount for any of you interested in their premium content, which I highly recommend.  If you’d like a video format of this post, check out the YouTube channel! So without any further ado, let’s get to the post! What Is OnlineMedEd? So quick intro into OnlineMedEd for any of you guys that aren’t familiar. It’s what I like to definitely consider...

How To Stay Productive During Long Study Days

As almost doctors, when we say we are “studying all day”, we really mean it. It’s definitely not an exaggeration, but our attention span lasts for about an hour before we start to procrastinate or lose focus. Many people have suggested working uninterrupted for 50-60 minutes and taking a 10-15 minute break during long study days to optimize productivity and brain energy. My years in medical school enabled me to perfect this strategy. When I try to multitask, I tend to flounder. I see friends and classmates trying to take notes but simultaneously on Facebook. I find that this is not the best use of time because not only are you sitting in class getting nothing done, but you have to repeat all the information you’ve tried to retain later on. It’s tough retaining the information from Step 1 and your sister’s cousin’s wedding photos. One huge tip for incoming almost doctors is to physically remove myself from my desk space or room where I study and do the following. The same can be said about studying in your bed. Only go to bed when you’re ready to sleep or take a nap. Creating these habits really help to train your mind. When I’m sitting at my desk, I know that I have to get my work done. If I am studying on my laptop in my bed, I know I will...

5 Steps to Writing The Perfect Doctor’s Resume

Writing a doctor’s resume requires precision. You have to compose, in just one or two pages, a summary of your education and career. It’s crucial not to leave the wrong information out, but you also need to avoid making it too long. There is no magic formula that will guarantee your resume is a perfect fit for a recruiter, but there are some basic guidelines that will improve your chances. Here are five steps to writing a doctor’s resume. Contact information For the most part, it doesn’t matter what order you put your sections in, except your contact information. This part needs to go first, and should be kept straightforward. State your name, your address, your email, LinkedIn profile, cell phone, pager, and fax, if you have one. Don’t forget to include your license or any other registration numbers.  Education and certifications If you’re a recent graduate, you’ll want to emphasize your education section, since you probably won’t have any work experience. State the medical school where you obtained your education, the location of the institution, your degree, and the year you obtained it. Be sure you double check your names and dates, because a recruiter absolutely will. You don’t want to come off as careless or neglectful. “Remember to include any internships you have completed, making sure to include where you worked and what your area of specialization...

Four Twitter Accounts Med Students Should Follow

Studying medicine is not exactly the easiest task to tackle. With the increasing proliferation of social media, many people continue to insist that the many social media platforms that exist today pose a pretty real distraction for medical students. However, it does not actually have to be this way, since but many people have now taken ownership of the various platforms out there so as to help medical students, rather than hinder them. Let us check out a few Twitter accounts to follow, that have been set up to effectively help medical students with their test reviews, studies, work ethic, or just about anything that will help them cope with everyday life as a student of medicine. The BS and fake news detector extraordinaire: @CaulfieldTim Tim Caulfield is a professor at the University of Alberta and teaches health law and science policy. His claim to fame is the fact that he always seems to know how to read scientific studies and distinguish the same from the ‘fluff’ that masquerades as real science. He has an intuitive knowledge of just when fake people are trying to make health claims that are either not backed by science or for that matter, are backed by pseudo-science at the very most. And what is more, he is definitely not afraid of calling out all such individuals who actually make such fake claims. A case in point being his very...

Private and Public Education: You Get What You Pay For

You truly get what you pay for – in life and in education. A Forbes article listed 25 expensive colleges and universities and deemed them “worth every penny.” Having gone to one of the top 10 schools on the list, I can attest that there is a significant difference between private and public education. When it comes to pre-medical and medical studies, we are told when applying to college and medical school that it doesn’t matter where you go because you’ll be a doctor anyway. In fact, we are often discouraged to rake up more student loans by refuting an acceptance from a better, more expensive school.  Some students even turn to combined programs (gaining entry into medical school after just 2-3 years of college) to save a year or two of tuition. The decision to attend a private or public school for either college or medical education is entirely personal. When I was younger, of course, I listened to the advice of my elders because I didn’t know any better. Now, having my own experiences in higher education, I vow to only send my future children to the best schools they can get into. While a private school affords more opportunities, students at public colleges can end up at good medical schools and medical students at public schools do end up getting competitive residencies. It boils down to your...

What Is The Best Way To Get The Most Out Of Clinical Clerkships?

It’s been a mere 4 weeks since I started my third year of medical school. I was one of the few brave (or foolish, whichever you prefer) souls to start on internal medicine. I’ll be honest, clinical clerkships are no walk in the park. I’m in the hospital 6 days a week, waking up at 5:30 AM and hoping to trudge back home by 7 PM, grab a little bite to eat, and pass out on the couch. But don’t get me wrong, I would never trade this for the first two years of medical school. The fatigue definitely hits you everyday, but the reward of finally learning what I came to medical school to do in the first place is unparalleled. So now that you are finally a third year, what is the best way to get the most out of rotations? In my opinion, it comes down to three simple rules: 1. Know your patients AND know other people’s patients I know what you’re going to say. I can already see you nodding your head from side to side and judging me. Let me be clear, I’m not that guy who tries to know everything about everything in order to show off, because honestly, I have the attention span of a squirrel. I am, however, a proponent of the principle that you learn by doing. I still...

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Step 2

First of all, you know how everyone says Step 2 is much easier than Step 1? They are correct. If you were conscious during your 3rd year clerkships and you spend a reasonable amount of time studying, you will be able to get a better score than you did on Step 1. Many people have asked me how I studied for Step 2, so I decided to write a quick blog about. (Disclaimer: If you’re applying to Ortho, Neurosurg, Derm, or Ophtho, none of this applies to you. You just need to talk to one of your people.) I chose not to take any time off to prepare for Step 2 because I had a six-week Psychiatry rotation at the end of 3rd year.  This rotation is lovingly referred to as “Psych-cation” because the hours are pretty amazing (usually 8:30-ish to lunchtime). In other words, I knew I would have time to study. So I scheduled Step 2 for June 29th, which was three days after my Psych shelf, and two days before the first day of 4th year.  (Yay! One day of vacation!) I ordered First Aid for Step 2 CK and Step 2 Secrets. (I didn’t use the latter very much, although it is a good resource and has great derm pictures.) Because I had used UWorld for my 3rd year clerkships, I reset the Qbank and started over. The Step 2 Qbank has ~2,200 questions...