medschool

Ridiculous Things Pre-Meds Say

Getting a medical school acceptance is one of the most exciting moments in a Pre-Med’s life. We found that this joy might alter the state of mind of some students, in turn causing them to post some pretty ridiculous things on internet blogs. After reading through The Student Doctor Network thread “Class of 2017”, we found a few of these gems to share with you. Pre-Med #1 Haha! I actually created a formula to determine the price of dinner: If you win (your guess <= my score) then I will buy you a dinner according to the brackets below: Guess: 1-20 then (score/10) ie. You guess 15 then I will buy you a dinner that costs at least than 1.5$ Guess: 21-27 then (score/8) Guess: 28 – 29 then (score/5) Guess: 30-38 then (score/2) Guess 39+ then (score/1) This is to limit the amount of people who guess low numbers to insure free food and to reward someone who takes in insane guess by guessing >39 which is almost statistically impossible. If I win you owe me a dinner according to the following formula (Your Guess – My Score) x 2 I.e. if you guess 35 and I score a 28 then you owe me a 14$ dinner. Well even if I don’t do well I am planning to make sure everyone else does equally bad. (not you guys but the...

Five Careers For Health Degree Graduates

One of the main problems that students often tend to face after they complete their degree and/or certification is the big question of, “Where do I go from here?”. Must health degree graduates go to medical school or are there alternatives? It might have once felt like getting a health degree meant building the foundation of your career but now that you’ve done it, you start to understand how lost you truly are. Don’t be discouraged, there’s a lot that you can do with your health degree which most people are not necessarily aware of. Opening the doors to great opportunities One thing is for sure, your health degree can never go to waste. Here are a few ways you can make sure to enhance your health career: #1: Health Coach Health coach is allows you to have a one-on-one setting with your clients and lay out a plan to promote a healthier lifestyle. This plan is often related to their current health requirements and as their health counselor, your main responsibilities will majorly be: – Educate and promote health maintenance – Guide lifestyle changes such as diet, smoking cessation, mental health management, etc. – Counsel the client on health management – Develop health seminars These are only a few responsibilities place on you. Remember, before opting for this field, research the type of certification you want since health...

Why I Didn’t Do Pathology

In a lot of ways, I would have been a good match for pathology. I’m a huge nerd, for starters. I’m lazy, so I’m sure I would have enjoyed sitting in one place, looking at slides. Plus you don’t have to do an intern year. You don’t have to do an intern year! I mean, why isn’t everyone a pathologist? Here’s why I didn’t do pathology: 1) I am very prone to eyestrain and looking in a microscope was possibly the best way for me to do it. If I were a pathologist, I’d be walking around with a headache 100% of the time. 2) I didn’t enjoy my histology OR my general pathology courses. So… yeah. Pathology was taught badly, but histology was just hella boring. 3) I think it would freak me out having to be so detail-oriented. You miss one cell and that could mean your whole career. 4) It seems like pathologists are people who need to know everything about everything, which is a lot of pressure. Although this wasn’t the reason I didn’t do pathology, but I’ve heard the job market in path is dire right now. But the biggest reason is that if I had done path, I’d probably have gone blind from looking at all those slides. Originally on Dr. Fizzy’s...

Your Guide as a Medical Student Next Summer

It can be tough to decide what you want to do as a medical student next summer. For me, the natural choice has always been research internships, for a few different reasons. First, I like that you get paid to work and that you get to experience what it’s like to be in graduate school. I also genuinely like research and find that the lab is a very fulfilling place to be (even when everything goes wrong). So, I have always done research. But this summer I am contemplating a few different options and the struggle to decide is very real! There are many considerations whenever deciding how to spend your time as a pre-medical or medical student. There are important considerations and not-so-important considerations. It can be challenging to decide what is important, both to you and to your future, and what is not important. This upcoming summer will be my last one while in undergraduate and last one before applying and interviewing (hopefully) for medical school. Here is my thought process for deciding what to do when there are too many wonderful options out there for students to choose! The important decisions are those that revolve around your own satisfaction and happiness. Will you be happy with the day-to-day expectations that your plans involve? Are you doing this for yourself or for someone else? If you received nothing out...

Five Ways To Keep Your Brain Alert In Medical School

Reading a Fast Company article this morning,  I was inspired to consider the ways I can keep my brain alert for the long haul. As a student, I do study most of the time so one could argue that my brain is constantly alert. It’s true that I do have to make a conscientious effort to relax my brain.  But, the suggestions in the article were very helpful. I’ve slightly modified the five daily habits that were recommended to the general public to be more school friendly. With a schedule as busy as ours, the following five suggestions may not be feasible to do on a daily basis. I think weekly is more manageable. Change your diet. I recently made changes to my own diet by drinking more water. If you’re anything like me, spending money and investing in a more expensive product such as the trendy Swell bottle could motivate you to drink more water. Or, adding fruit like berries, or lemon slices, or herbs like mint, help to change the flavor of plain water. Take inventory of what you could benefit from the most. For example, if you order Domino’s 3X a week, perhaps making home cooked meals would be an appropriate swap to incorporate more greens and vegetables to your diet. I have also found that switching the grocery store you shop for food adds some...

Top Five Graduate Degree Careers and Jobs

If you are wondering what you should ‘get a masters in’ by going back to school, you may want to consider one of the 5 fastest growing careers that require a graduate degree. All five choices represent occupations with the most projected growth between 2016-26 as reported by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), where the typical entry-level education is a master’s degree.i Earning a master’s degree is a big commitment. First, you likely want to make sure it’s worth the investment – of time, money and energy. In addition to considering your interest, it could be important to look towards your future career. Why not match your strengths with some solid data about job growth and salary potential? You could explore topics you love while preparing to pursue a potentially dynamic career path in the future. What Are the 5 Fastest Growing Careers That Require a Graduate Degree? The fastest growing careers that require a graduate degree are: (1) Physician Assistant – PA, (2) Nurse Practitioner – NP, (3) Statistician, (4) Mathematician, (5) Genetic Counselor. ii Just what does it mean to be in this category? Fastest Growing Careers That Require a Graduate Degree Courtesy of gradschools.com   Employment Outlook for the Fastest Growing Careers With a Graduate Degree (2016-2026) The number one factor in determining the top 5 fastest growing careers requiring a graduate degree is the employment outlook from 2016-2026. This is a...

What Happens If You Overuse Antibiotics?

I went to med school in a place where Lyme disease was endemic. So when I was on my Medicine rotation and one of my co-students complained about feeling tired and achy for a few days, our attending immediately said to him, “Get tested for Lyme disease.” The student was reluctant. He didn’t have a rash. Our student health plan was crappy with a huge deductible, so he would have had to pay for the test out of pocket. Also, I pointed out (from a personal Lyme scare) that he could get a false negative this early on. “Well, if you don’t want to get the test,” the attending said, “I’ll write you a prescription for doxycycline and you can just treat it.” And then we saw another attending, who totally agreed with this. Even years later, I still find this offensive. The course of treatment for Lyme is 10-21 days of antibiotics. Would you really give someone up to THREE WEEKS of antibiotics because they were tired and achy a few days? I took doxycycline and it made me throw up… not something I’d personally be excited to take for weeks for no reason. And… hello, antibiotic resistance? I’d like to believe that the attendings were just over-treating because it was a colleague and not something they recommend to all their patients. Originally syndicated from Dr. Fizzy’s Blog...