medschool

Specialty That is Right For You

Link from The University of Virginia School of Medicine, Material from book “How to Choose a Medical Specialty”, by Anita Taylor Flickr | steven…ng   Decisions…decisions…every medical student has enough on their plate to begin with so the added stress of trying to choose which specialty suits you best is an unnecessary burden. BUT have no fear; there is a fast, easy and effective test to help you make this decision. Click below to check it out!   Specialty Test   Website from University of Virginia School of Medicine.   This material was originally published in the book “How to Choose a Medical Specialty”, by Anita Taylor. Anita graduated from Bryn Mawr College with an B.A. in Sociology and from Wake Forest University with a master’s degree in education and counseling. She is an Associate Professor and serves as the director of Volunteer Faculty Outreach and co-advisor to the Family Medicine Interest Group for the Department of Family Medicine. The author of “How to Choose a Medical Specialty,”, 4th edition, she is the OHSU Director of Career Advising for the medical students. She also has a special interest in physician and medical family life planning as well as faculty development. She and her husband, Robert B. Taylor, M.D. have 2 children and 4...

Preparing to Apply to Medical School

Wondering if a career as a physician would be a good fit for you? Applying to medical school is a long road and it’s important to make sure that it’s right for you BEFORE you apply.  Here are a few things to think about when deciding if medicine, or any career, is the right one for you: 1. What do you love? 2. What are you good at? 3. What can you be paid for? 4. What does the world need?   Most would agree that a career as a physician comes with a reasonable salary and is definitely something the world needs.  However, is it something that you love and/or would be good at? To figure this out, you should work with pre-health advisors (available at many undergraduate institutions) as well as find a mentor in the field of medicine. Make sure this mentor is someone who has the time to get to really know you and can guide you in the right direction. After you find a mentor or two, it’s good to get involved in a wide range of opportunities that can introduce you to different aspects of healthcare such as research studies, volunteer experience with clinical patients and leadership/advocacy roles.  When choosing what kind of activities to get involved in, it’s important to remember not only to go broad but to also go deep and show...

How Augmented Reality is Changing Medical School

Augmented reality (AR) is a technology that combines the real world with computer generated enhancements, such as sound, video, and graphics to literally augment the world around you. I’m sure we’re all aware of the most recent phenomenon that attracted kids and adults alike to wander around streets and parks for elusive Pokemon. PokemonGo is the perfect example of augmented reality in action and used for a mainstream purpose.   This same technology that puts a cartoon Pikachu in the real grass in front of you is now being put to use in medical schools. This could completely change the way med students learn about anatomy and physiology. Students would be able to interact with a 3D representation of the human body, making it easier for students to transition to actual patients.   Image: Source   Cool, right? Check out the video below to see the technology in action!   Video: Source   3D4Medical‘s newest product, Complete Anatomy Lab (CAL), has the potential to completely transform the way medical students study anatomy and physiology. The software, with a little help from hardware, can place 3D representations of the human body in any space. The 3D models are composed of over 6,500 interactive body structures, complete with descriptions, related lectures, and other useful study tools the user can summon at any time.   The technology may help reduce the number of...

Essential Apps for Med Students

Admit it: you’re always on your phone. Instead of spending another hour trying to catch that elusive Pokémon, check out these essential apps for med school students. These apps are specifically designed to help you increase your productivity, stay organized and survive.   Image: Source   Anatomy Apps These anatomy apps will give you quick access to all the anatomy you need and help you learn along the way –   1. Muscle & Bone Anatomy 3D iOS Android With a 3D view of the body, this app can isolate muscle groups by actions with animations and commentary. When you’re ready, use one of the built-in quizzes to put your skills to the test.   Image: Source   2. Radiology 2.0: One Night in the ED iOS In a series of case studies, this app walks you through everything you need to know when reviewing CT scans.   3. 3D Brain iOS Android Study all parts of the brain with zoom and rotation features on 29 interactive structures. Learn how different brain regions function, how they are involved in mental illness and what happens if they’re injured.   Clinical Practice Apps These tools are particularly convenient for clinical practice –   4. EBMcalc Complete iOS Android Perform complicated medical calculations on the go with EBMcalc Complete.   5. Epocrates iOS, Android This comprehensive reference tool covers almost everything and includes...

Tips For The New Semester

Ahh, a stack of new syllabi, unopened textbooks, unused notebooks, and fresh packages of pens, pencils, and highlighters…it’s the start of a new semester. Going in, you may think you have a plan, but somehow it always gets derailed. You find yourself pulling all-nighters, losing track of your diet, missing deadlines, and spending too much money on coffee. Then suddenly, you emerge after finals exhausted, surprised that you even made it to the end.   We’re here to change that!   Here are some tips to help you stay on track this semester.   1. Stay Organized If you find yourself forgetting deadlines or exam dates, it’s definitely time to think about more effectively organizing your school calendar. Make sure that you have a planner, calendar, or set reminders (or all of the above!) so that you never miss a beat. It really helps to look ahead at all of your assignments and exams for each class throughout the semester and note the important dates. You can even color code each class to make staying on top of your work even easier.   Image: Source   2. Make a Plan …And stick to it. If you often feel like there aren’t enough hours in the day to get everything done, you should think about making a schedule. By carving out a schedule, ahead of time, you will be more likely to fit...

7 Ways to Be a Remarkably Average Pre-Med

Date: Tuesday, February 7th, 2017 Time: 6:00-7:00PM Location: Online Classroom Cost: FREE Register here!   Volunteering, shadowing, research, leadership…the list goes on. Pre-meds work so hard to stand out for medical school, but they all end up doing the same activities. When the time comes to apply, so many of them look identical on paper.   The checklist is good, but it’s only half the battle. Successful applicants not only do the checklist, but they find a way to make themselves stand out from the crowd. You can either: 1) be better than everyone else (4.0 GPA, 38 MCAT), or 2) be different from other students applying to med school.   Come to this class, led by Savvy Pre-Med author and Passport Admissions founder, Rob Humbracht, to learn what you can do to stand out (while also staying true to yourself!) Warning: it’s not easy to figure out the best path for you; this presentation will challenge you to take bold steps toward becoming the very best applicant you can be.   Register...

3 Tips for “Average” Pre-Meds to Stand Out in Their Medical School Admissions Essays

The dreaded “diversity question.”   Each year, as students fill out their secondary applications, they’re bombarded with essay prompts about their “diverse qualities,” “unique insights,” or “unusual life experiences.” Schools will usually ask how these qualities, insights, or experiences will contribute to their campus or environment.   Pre-meds are quick to label themselves as average, normal, or even boring. Every example or topic they can muster sounds lame. What was once a crisis of writing is now a crisis of identity, and they start calling their whole application (and life?) into question.   Does this sound like you? Never fear! We have three tips for helping self-proclaimed “average” students find something to say.     TIP #1 – THINK SMALL A student might profile herself and think, “I’m white, middle class, and suburban. I’ve played on the tennis team, volunteered clinically, and written for my school’s academic science journal. How the heck am I supposed to sound diverse?”   The problem here is that she’s thinking too broadly. But if she narrows her scope, let’s say to one summer or maybe even one afternoon, she has a better chance to find an interesting angle for her essay. She could also choose to focus on one small aspect of her “average” activities.   For example, let’s say she petitioned to change the format of her school’s academic journal to increase...

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