medschool

This Yale Professor is Tackling Mental Health Through Her Unique Class

Laurie Santos’s, a Yale Professor and her class “Psychology and the Good Life” made headline news for enrolling the most amount of students – a whopping 1,200 students – in its 316-year history. Most other classes do not exceed 600 students. In her lectures, Dr. Santos teaches students how to change their behavior in order to lead a happier life. According to Dr. Santos, students were drawn to the course because she believes students at Yale experience anxiety and depression. In her course, she addresses the rampant mental health crisis that permeates Yale and other elite colleges and universities. Santos wants students at Yale to be happier and lead more fulfilling lives, but also aims to change the culture at the university. According to the NYT article on the course, a 2013 report by the Yale College Council discovered that more than 50% of the undergraduate student body sought after mental health care services at the university. The course focuses on theories in positive psychology as well as strategies to make behavioral lifestyle changes  to live better, more fulfilling lives. Course assignments include quizzes and exams like a regular college course, but also includes an innovative self-improvement project she has called the “Hack Yo’ Self project.” The weekly assignments are far more traditional, encouraging students to perform random acts of kindness and form new social connections. The course has 24 teaching assistants spanning...

What It’s Like Being At A Caribbean Medical School

I distinctly remember sitting in one of my undergrad pre-med classes joking to a friend of mine after getting a below average MCAT score that, “I guess I’m gonna end up at a Caribbean medical school.” About 10 years later, after finishing Medical School at Saint George’s University, I sit here laughing at the person I was. The truth is, Caribbean Medical School was really an abstract concept at that point. I wouldn’t have been able to even tell you what the top 3 schools were—or even how their programs were even structured.  At that point in my life, I was always an honors student.  I graduated with over a 4.0 in high school, went on to earn mostly A’s in undergrad (except for those 3 C’s and one D in some of my chemistry courses), graduated with honors from The Ohio State University with so much volunteer, work and well rounded life experience under my belt.  Despite my 23 on the MCAT (whew, that was liberating), I had this faith that as long as I got a few interviews, I could easily win over an admissions committee and show them why I would make an excellent addition to their program.  My Ohio State pre-med advisor thought otherwise. When she told me I shouldn’t even apply because I wouldn’t get in, I thought she was being callous and pessimistic.  Well, I guess she was...

Why Use Speed Listening in Medical School?

Wouldn’t you just love to have a fast-forward button in medical school? Or wouldn’t you just crave for the ability quickly get through the boring lectures that you have every day? Have you ever avoided watching a Pathoma or Sketchy Pharm video because they were too long? What if I told you that you could use speed listening in medical school and cut your studying time in half? In this post, I will go over how to use speed listening in medical school. I will break down my step by step method that I used for my first two years of medical school. I also break down how I used speed listing to study for my Step 1. Why Use Speed Listening in Medical School? Many people get scared away when I mention speed listening in medical school. But honestly, I can’t think of going through medical school without it.  I had so much free time and my grades remained high while using speed listening, Thus I think speed-listening is something that should be tried by every medical student! Maybe you’re not a believer just yet. You may argue that it’s hard enough to listen to your lectures at 1x much less increasing that to 2x. I’d first argue that you don’t remember much of what you hear anyways. The typical saying is that you remember 10% of what you...

Expanding Medical Education to Address Physician Shortages

The American Medical Association (AMA) adopted policy at its Annual Meeting reaffirming the need for an increased number of medical residency slots to ensure that patients have access to an adequate physician workforce. As new medical schools have been established and enrollment in existing schools has expanded in recent years to help ease existing and predicted physician shortages, the new policy calls on legislators, private sector partnerships, and existing and planned medical schools to create and fund graduate medical education (GME) programs that can accommodate the equivalent number of additional medical school graduates, consistent with U.S. workforce needs. “Current data show that the number of U.S. medical student graduates is growing at a higher rate than the number of residency slots. Without expanding the number of residency positions available to future classes of medical school graduates, the number of graduates seeking positions will eventually exceed what is available,” said AMA Board Member and medical student Karthik V. Sarma, M.S. “The AMA will continue to vigorously advocate for the continued and expanded contribution by all health care payers at the federal, state, and local levels, as well as private sources, to adequately fund GME. We believe that it is imperative that efforts to expand the number of medical school graduates also address the need to ensure the availability of an adequate number of GME slots to meet the newly created...

The One Thing You Must Do After Taking The MCAT

RELAX. I took a two-week vacation right after my MCAT. Taking time to not think, or speak, about the MCAT is important for self-renewal. Once the exam was over, I went through the questions I was unsure of in my head and made a declaration to never think about them again. This is important both for your sanity and for the binding-non-disclosure policy you sign when you take the MCAT. What happens during that day is between you and the MCAT lords and never to be discussed or spoken about again. So, after your MCAT take a moment to go through everything you questioned (if you remember those questions like I do) and then flush them away for good. While relaxing, catch up with friends, family members, emails, Netflix shows, exercise, or anything else you’ve put on pause for the past few months during preparation. The night before my exam, my boyfriend surprised me with a family dinner to calm my nerves. Seeing my family and having their support reminded me of the confidence people have put in me and my abilities to succeed. So, after you complete what you consider the biggest exam of your life (right now at least) call and thank those that have battled this journey with you. Relax – but not for too long. If you are applying this cycle, the AMCAS application opened...

How to Write the Best Thesis and Thesis Protocol

How to Write the Best Thesis and Thesis Protocol Writing a thesis is hard work and anyone that has been through it will tell you that. By the time you get to this part of your studies, you have already been through a long road. This does not mean that it is going to be a walk in the park. Besides working on your actual thesis, you have to adhere to a lot of rules. This in itself can be frustrating to manage. There are some rules that need to be followed, but the process should have a level of excitement for you. After all this time, you have the opportunity to share your views with others. It does not matter if you are doing Ireland Thesis Writing or a UK Thesis. Everyone wants to write the best thesis ever written and it is possible for you to be in that group. You simply have to stick to the guidelines and give it your best shot. Here are some guidelines you can use to write the best thesis. Proposal You are going to be required to submit a thesis proposal before you write your actual paper. This is going to be reviewed and is the first challenge. Make sure you indicate what you are working on and how this information will be of value. State why this issue is...

What To Expect In Medical School Applications, From A Doctor

There is already an abundance of information online regarding medical school applications, how to submit letters of recommendation, etc. During today’s Q + A session, Dr. Andrew Nimmich of Tutor the People, addresses the more difficult questions commonly asked by pre-meds. The types of questions that are responsible for the most misinformation regarding the medical school applications process. Andrew Nimmich, is an incoming PGY-1 in vascular surgery, a recent graduate of Boston University School of Medicine, and co-founder and pre-med advisor at Tutor the People, where he has worked with many pre-meds to help them apply to medical school and increase their scores on the MCAT. What are medical schools looking for? Medical schools are interested in applicants with excellent academic abilities, strong interpersonal skills, clear dedication to medicine and medical science, and demonstrated compassion. That’s great, but how do we show this on the application and what activities are best? Below I will breakdown how to demonstrate each attribute on your application with examples. Academic abilities – Everyone knows that strong grades and MCAT scores demonstrate academic excellence. But what about freshman year where you received a 2.9 GPA? The good news is that the admissions committees are made up of humans, some of whom had 2.9 GPAs their freshman year. They understand that not everyone is perfect, however, what they like to see is an uptrend in grades....

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