medschool

Here’s How A Social Media Medical Community Can Help You Through School

I didn’t know much about MD/PhD programs as an undergraduate. I found some resources online and met with the program director at my school, but I didn’t really have easy access to any current MD/PhD students to go to for advice as I was preparing to apply to medical school. I also didn’t know many pre-meds or join any pre-med clubs. I hadn’t planned on going to medical school until late into undergrad, so I didn’t have a supportive group that would be going through the same grueling process that I was about to undertake. Therefore, I went to social media to find my community. The summer I applied to medical school, I made a Twitter account specifically for connecting with the medical community. Twitter was an ideal platform for this purpose because of the short character limits for posts, the ability to make public posts and follow others who do not necessarily have to follow you back, the easy ability to retweet (or share) another account’s post on your own timeline, hashtags to connect posts to those of related content, and handles that allow you to establish your identity while also maintaining anonymity if desired (for example, I started being known as only pre-MD/PhD Life). While other social media sites have incorporated some of these aspects, Twitter remains the best site I’ve found for a robust discussion within...

How To Renew Your Love For Medicine By Being Like A Kid

On a recent outreach trip to a public school, I spent the morning with children in the 3rd grade. I was the one who was supposed to give a presentation and teach them about healthy habits and routines. Instead, I learned from a classroom full of 9 year olds. As we get older, we tend to lose the vibrancy and enthusiasm for life that is characteristic of childhood. As soon as we experience a hint of stress, adults become bland. We lose zest and zeal for living. These are some of the small things I noticed in the classroom that served as necessary reminders for me in order to renew your love for medicine: Speak your mind During the presentation, I could not help but notice some kids interrupting to give their opinion. They really did not care if they were called on. Few actually raised their hand and waited their turn. The beauty of this was noticing that children value their opinion enough to blurt it out loud. They demand to be heard. Never once did the kids think that someone was judging their comments, or did they fear voicing their opinion.  I think this is something adults should embrace more. Often, we are too scared to share our opinion and fear judgement from others. This is especially pertinent in the class when we are too to ask...

The Perfect Medical School Morning Routine

One of the original posts from the blog was about my miracle morning in medical school. Since then I’ve adopted a consistent 4:30 wake up time and a new morning routine. In this post, I will go over my updated perfect medical school morning routine. Wake Up At 4:30: Yes I still wake up at this ungodly hour. In fact, today I woke up at 3. Why? Read this post on how waking up at 4:30 changed my life for the better.  To help myself get out of bed by 4:30 I start setting alarms at 3:30 and 4. To be honest, even after 1.5 years of waking up at 4:30, it’s still not easy. But as soon as I swing my legs over the bed and get up – I’ve won. The thing I’ve found which makes this easier is to have a solid evening routine. When I wake up I already know what I will be working on. This takes the decision making out of it. All I need to do is get my butt out of bed. “To be honest, even after 1.5 years of waking up at 4:30, it’s still not easy. But as soon as I swing my legs over the bed and get up – I’ve won.“ Read for 30 Minutes: If you follow my mini resolutions post (you should if you aren’t) then you’re aware that I’ve read 12 book before the end of February. What?...

Being a Doctor is Like Working in Customer Service

I feel like as a doctor, part of my job is customer service.  Because when I see inpatients, a lot of the time when I ask at the end of seeing them if there’s anything else I can do for them, they have a complaint about their call button taking too long to be answered, the food being bad, their roommate being too loud, etc.I try to handle the complaints best I can.  I never ignore them.  I say something like, “I’m so sorry that happened.  Let me see what I can do to fix it.” Then I tell them my plan, which involves anything from talking to the nursing supervisor about nursing issues or to the unit coordinator to get them a room change.  I can’t personally fix the problem, but at least I try to show I’m taking it seriously and addressing it. It’s made me a lot less tolerant of bad customer service. Recently, I got an email at 6PM from our leasing office, saying that tomorrow (a holiday when kids were off from school), they were doing repairs and our water would be shut off intermittently “after 8AM.”  I was horrified.  We didn’t even have a day’s notice of this!  I was going to be home with the kids all day and how can you do anything at home when you don’t know if you’re...

How To Handle Your Most Ambitious Med School Classmate

Having trouble handling your most ambitious med school classmate? Here’s the 411 on medical school “Gunners”. I consider my desire to be liked by everyone to be a blessing and a curse. It’s a blessing because it forces me into being, well, the “best” version of myself with people. It’s a curse because of the inevitable sensitivity and the occasional times where I refuse to stand up for myself because I want to avoid conflict. Avoiding conflict is generally a good thing, but that doesn’t mean avoidance is the best way to approach problems. You have to learn to stand up for yourself, to be assertive; I don’t think anything really taught me this quite like dealing with medical school Gunners. Now let’s be clear: If you are in medical school at all, you are on the Gunner Spectrum. When I refer to Gunners in this context, I am referring to the person who always has to blurt out the answer, even if the question is directed at someone else. This person may consciously or unconsciously undermine you in front of an attending by correcting something you say about YOUR patient. This person may slip in to scrub in on YOUR surgery. This person is just overall very aggressive, can be condescending, and has no concept of the word “teamwork.” Ugh. Gunners. There are a few different ways to respond to...

Why I Didn’t Do Family Medicine

Family Medicine might have been a better choice for me. I liked outpatient medicine much better than inpatient medicine. I like procedures, even pap smears. The hours are generally regular. Several people suggested family medicine as a good choice for me. Here’s why I decided against it: 1) Family medicine is very regional. In some parts of the country, many of the docs are family practitioners. In other parts of the country, there are few and they are not well respected. I trained in an area of the country where family medicine was not as common. Our family med sub-I was a disorganized joke. Almost all the people in my med school class who were interested in primary care did internal medicine or primary care residencies. Only a couple of people matched in Family Medicine. 2) I never wanted to deliver another baby for the rest of my life. 3) If I was overwhelmed by the idea of having to “know it all” in primary care, it’s even worse in family medicine, where you’re taking care of an even larger spectrum of patients. (Yes, you could restrict your practice, but you don’t always have that option.) 4) I worried that family med residency would be like a repeat of third year of med school, where you’re always in unfamiliar territory, always fumbling, and always the one who knows the...

How to Hack Your Work Week and Be More Productive

As doctors-in-training, we know we are smart. But somehow that intelligence doesn’t always directly translate to productivity. It is possible to work non-stop and try very hard, but still be ineffective and unproductive. The goal is to make it through medical training without burning out. In other words, in addition to students must learn to work smarter, not harder. How should we make the most of our work week? My biggest piece of advice is to conserve your energy. Misconception that you have to wake up early to get more done in the day. In fact, my personal experience and advice says otherwise. Sleep is imperative and naps are encouraged. In order to wake up early and be effective, you also have to sleep early. It is true that you can’t do everything perfectly all of the time, but cutting corners on your health and sacrificing your 8 hours. Your early morning power routine will come to a crashing halt if it does not include adequate sleep the night before. It is important to alter your routine to allow yourself to wind down. For example, it is best to avoid drinking coffee 6 hours before bedtime. Try to experiment and identify what helps you to fall asleep versus keeps you up at night. Some also advise against going to the gym at night, but I personally have not had...

Page 1 of 72123...10...Last ›