medschool

The Top Instagram Profiles Medical Students Should Follow

Being a medical student is one of the most challenging, fascinating, motivating and involving things you’ll ever do. Every day brings new problems to solve, new facts to learn, and new cases to investigate but that doesn’t mean you don’t occasionally find yourself lacking a bit of inspiration. However, thanks to the advent of social media, you can not only gain moments of much-needed inspiration from your mobile device, but you can also top up your knowledge while on the go! What are the best practices medical students should follow on social media? Better yet, what are the best Instagram profiles medical students should follow? All over the world, medical institutions and forward-thinking individuals in your field are using Instagram to sow seeds of brilliance across the internet, and the following Instagram accounts aimed directly at medical students are sure to provide real moments of wonder and academic curiosity. These social media accounts are ideal for browsing when on your way to college, sitting on a bus, waiting for a friend at a cafe, or during any other downtime you experience in your busy day. Fun, exciting, and full of surprising facts and unique cases, they can help with your academic performance and problem-solving skills, too. Who’d have thought procrastinating on Instagram could be so useful?  The awesome team at @essentialsofem asked me to make some notes for their...

A List Of Do’s and Don’ts for Your Summer Break

It’s the light at the end of the tunnel. Or maybe more appropriately, at the middle of the tunnel. Your one and only summer break, between first and second year. And to think, this might be your “last” summer. The last one until retirement that you could choose to spend kicking your feet up, watching Netflix, sleeping in, and traveling incessantly. Haven’t you earned it after the most academically rigorous year of your life? The angel on your shoulder chimes in: Look at all this time you’ve got! Time to do research, to get published. Time to make inroads with faculty and participate in community outreach projects and global health initiatives. Time to study undisturbed and set yourself up for second-year success. Only a fool would squander such an opportunity! Surely a compromise must exist…. To put things in perspective, let me give you full disclosure: Like most normal humans, I love having fun, often as much fun as possible. And, like most normal medical professionals, I like succeeding, advancing, and perennially trying to be the best. Can these two forces be reconciled? Yes, they can, as you will find below. Let’s go through some of the DOs and DON’Ts of this rare and magnificent summer break between first and second year: DON’T try to start studying aggressively for Step 1. This coming from a USMLE prep-driven blog? What...

How to Increase Your Chances of a Residency as an International Medical Graduate

Business fields like marketing, HR and finance consider international learning and job experience as a major advantage working in the favor of aspiring candidates, however, this doesn’t hold true in the healthcare industry. If you are an International Medical Graduate (IMG), then the chances of reserving a spot in US residency programs is lower than a typical US graduate due to a number of reasons. However, this doesn’t mean you cannot take steps to make a good competitor. The key is to master IMG matching. Here are some clinical residency matching tips for IMGs: Before Applying Formulate strategy and goals Make a practical strategy that is based on facts and statistics. For instance, if you take a really long time to finish the USMLE steps, your chances of getting in an accredited or preferred residency program will go down. High scores will increase your chances of an early match. Choose your specialty and continue building your resume to increase your chances of acceptance. Choose Your Specialty Sensibly What specialty you choose determines if you get an interview or call for a residency match. Some preferred specialties for IMGs based on the historical data include: Internal Medicine, Psychiatry, Family Medicine, and Pediatrics. Specialties, where your chances are low, are: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Anesthesiology, Orthopedic surgery. However, if you have extremely high scores and superb clinical skill sets, you can expect...

Medical Students Graduate Under Transformative National Curricula Redesign Initiative

CHICAGO — With five medical schools this year graduating their first classes of students fully trained under a transformative national curricula redesign initiative, the American Medical Association (AMA) is highlighting innovations from recent years that have better trained the next generation of physicians. Launched five years ago, the AMA’s Accelerating Change in Medical Education Consortium includes 32 of the country’s leading medical schools working together to create the medical school of the future. The first medical students to graduate after receiving full training using the Consortium’s innovative curricula include, NYU School of Medicine, Indiana University (IU) School of Medicine, the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) School of Medicine, and Penn State College of Medicine. These schools were among the 11 founding medical schools to receive $1 million AMA grants to develop curricula to reimagine medical education and join the AMA Consortium. “Through our work over the past five years, we have made significant progress in a short amount of time toward ensuring future physicians are prepared to meet the needs of patients in the modern health system,” said AMA CEO & Executive Vice President James L. Madara, M.D. “Today, the foundation we created is producing real results through the trail-blazing advancements in medical education developed by the Consortium. These future physicians will be better equipped to provide care in a practice environment of rapid progress, new...

Three Things To Remember When Studying for the MCAT

Studying for the MCAT is truly a marathon, and there are great challenges if you approach this exam like a sprint. I began my MCAT preparation in January of this year, and after waves of triumph and defeat, I had to reevaluate how I was studying and the mindset I had towards doing well. This is because marathons are not as easily affected by things like mindset, weather conditions, opponent capabilities. These are the qualms of a sprint – the short-term, rapid onset of results. Approaching the MCAT must be steadier and more constant than this. You have to be resistant to waves of triumph and defeat, flexible in your training, and open-minded. While I’ve learned a lot about science while preparing for this exam, I’ve learned even more about myself. Be flexible to change. This is applicable to anyone preparing for an exam or in school. I had strategically planned exactly how I would study, when, where, and what content. I learned early on that the way I had designed was not the most suitable way for my learning and that I was worried more about marking something off my checklist than actually reviewing and learning the material. So, you must be open about changing your study plan and constantly reevaluating if what you are doing is most suitable for you. For me, this meant transitioning from mostly...

The Importance of Psychiatry to Medical Students

“Psychiatry is the art of teaching people how to stand on their own feet while reclining on chairs.” – Sigmund Freud After hours of combing through the Internet, I finally laid eyes on this quote that most aptly defines my perception of psychiatry after having rotated in the specialty as a medical student for a mere three weeks. I distinctly remember my first morning as I walked through those double-locked doors on the 14th floor. I can still feel the reverberations of those barrier-like monstrosities shutting behind me as I hurried into the unit. I was apprehensive, no doubt about it, as I found myself under lock and key in the psychiatric ward for the first time in my life. As I searched for my phone in the blind-ending pockets of my white coat to check if I was on time for orientation, I heard someone exclaim “Good morning!” leaving me almost stunned by the unexpected familiarity. As I looked up, I saw a patient with yellow headphones on his head, holding a book and greeting me with a smile. And let me tell you, that was the first of many such greetings. Curious to find out what brought him here, I spontaneously rushed to find the resident and ask him. Obviously, someone this happy and upbeat couldn’t possibly have anything wrong with them now could they? To my...

Here’s What You Need To Know Before Applying to Medical School

College students are always asking “how do I get into medical school?”. Before we even ask that it’s important to know what’s important before applying to medical school. Wouldn’t you want to know the basis of what makes a high-quality medical school applicant? In this post, I break down what I think are essential items you need to know before applying to medical school. Learn how hard medical school really is in my first pre-med post! But first, let me give you some insight into my applicant process. When I was applying to medical school, l I was not a stressed out applicant. In fact, I was anything but. How do you ask? I had developed a strategic plan from the very start. I knew how I would gradually develop a competitive resume. I knew that my gameplan would lead me to become a high-quality medical school applicant. Did I know I would get into medical school on my first try? Did I think I’d receive acceptance offers from every school I interviewed at? Did I know I would get into one of the top institutions in the country? Absolutely not but I was confident I would do well! Now maybe you’re thinking I did well because of a stellar MCAT or a high GPA. I had an average MCAT and a decent GPA. It was the extracurriculars which made me a...

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