medschool

Tips for Medical Students: How to Make Money While You Study?

Being a medical student comes as a very expensive cost and it can leave students with no extra money to spend on things they enjoy. Then of course you have to deal with the enormous amount of work that comes with medical school, which leaves you with very little free time. With all that being said, there is a way for you to make some extra cash while completing your studies. Many students live away from home during their studies which can make life even more unaffordable. You simply have to find the options that work for you and your schedule. Here are some ways you can make money while being a medical student. Writing As a medical student you are going to learn a lot of valuable information that can be shared with the rest of the world. You can do freelance writing for a medical blog or website and be a guest contributor. If the blog is high end, you can earn a significant amount of money per article. The great thing about this is that you can fit it into your schedule and write when you have some extra time. All you have to do generally is meet the deadline and you got some money in your pocket. Just be careful not to waste too much of your time writing for blogs that pay you next...

My First Patient Death: From Admission to Expiration

As a medical student, we’re “taught” how to act when during patient death: how to actually perform the necessary exams, how we are supposed to treat the deceased and, to a much smaller degree, how to interact with the loved ones. I went through this. I saw my share of patients who died during my rotations. This story is in that vein, but unlike all the ones I “treated” as a medical student, this patient is the one I claim as my first death. He was mine from evaluation in the ER, to care in the ICU, to the end. So here goes… “Time of death, sixteen hundred.” It’s such an easy statement to make, 5 short words, but, in the understatement of all understatements, that simplicity belied the enormity of the situation. He was 47. He spent his last ten days in the ICU, most of that heavily medicated and intubated. When were finally given permission to initiate comfort measures, he lasted ten hours. I remember getting paged down to the ER from the call rooms. My PGY-3 and I were having a normal call night, 8 admissions, 2 deaths, so we knew this would be something “good.” As was my privilege being the intern (and with no medical student), I was the first at bedside and I remember thinking “This guy is sick as sh*t.” Pick a...

Why I Didn’t Do Pediatrics

I love kids. In college, my advisor was a pediatrician, because I thought that’s what I wanted to be. When I was in medical school, I was the co-President of the pediatric club. During third year, I scheduled pediatrics to be my third rotation because that’s the order in which you’re supposed to do the field that you’re interested in. (You don’t want to do it too early because then you’ll look like an idiot, but not too late in case you hate it and change your mind.) I’m not a pediatrician. So what happened? Here’s why I decided against pediatrics: 1) I spent my whole damn rotation sick with URIs and GI bugs. 2) Really sick kids make me desperately sad, to the point where even doing a practice question about a child with cancer ruined my whole day. 3) I am really, really bad at looking in screaming baby ears. And that’s like half of what pediatricians do. 4) I found medicine involving non-sick kids to be really boring. Strep throat? Boring. Rashes? Boring. Otitis media? Boring. 5) Parents = mega aggravating. (Of course, now I deal with adult children, which are also mega aggravating.) 6) When I saw a cute baby, I mostly just wanted to play with the baby, kiss him all over his cute little pudgy face, and then go home and make lots...

How to Find The Best Medical School For You

With so many factors to consider when applying to medical school, it’s difficult to figure out what school is truly the best fit for you. I didn’t fully realize what I was looking for in my best fit medical school until I started interviewing. Sure, any medical school’s website will give you lots of important details, but after actually seeing the school in person and talking to students about the program, the real differences between schools begin to crystallize. So, for everyone out there who’s applying to med school, I’m going to try to make your selection process easier. Based on my experiences interviewing and interacting with med schools, here are 4 factors to consider when figuring out what med school’s the best fit for you: MD vs. DO There are two types of medical schools: MD (allopathic) and DO (osteopathic). Choosing between MD and DO will likely be the first step in your med school selection process. While both schools teach the same basic curricula, DO schools also teach osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT). MD also schools tend to require higher GPA and MCAT scores from applicants than DO schools. MD schools may also offer additional research opportunities for their students. Despite these differences between schools, remember that one isn’t necessarily more or less than the other. Whether you attend an MD or DO school, you’ll still come out...

Summer Work Experience For Medics – How To Ramp Up Your All-Important Applications

When you’re considering your future career as an MD, what’s the biggest factor that will likely contribute to you landing a place at that college, or even scoring your dream residency? Could it be how long you kept your head in a book? Well, clocking up the hours in the library certainly helps! Will it be your bedside manner? Fortunately, this is something you can hone during your ward rounds, as you gain more and more exposure with the patients in your care. What about what extracurricular activities you committed yourself to during the summer break? That could certainly be a factor – bear with me, here! The short answer is relevant, educational and vocational experience: both fantastic grades as well as being able to show dedication to the field you’re interested in. The power couple of good grades (or, moreso, a good degree) and strong extracurricular experience can get you very far – as you’ll know from both your college and med school applications. For both pre-meds, and those anticipating their college days with a keen interest in medicine, the perfect time to build up your relevant experience is during the long summer break. Yes, of course this is a time to wind down, but why not build up a bank of solid, relevant work experience hours? We’ve pulled together our top tips for gaining relevant work experience...

You Come First: The Hippocratic Oath Matters To Students, Too

The Hippocratic Oath, an oath historically taken by physicians to uphold certain ethical standards, states, “I will apply, for the benefit of the sick, all measures which are required“. A pretty straightforward statement, something that pre-med and medical students typically understand – we have to do everything in our power to help our patients. We spend countless hours in libraries, labs, and hospitals trying to better ourselves so one day we can help others. The stress is very apparent, medicine is obnoxiously competitive and it takes a toll on everyone involved, students included, whether we like to admit it or not. We’re always so engrossed in our studies and endeavors that we forget one simple, but significant detail: we’re human too! Throughout history, healthcare (especially mental health) of healthcare professionals has been stigmatized. It is often viewed that since we take care of others, it is a sign of weakness on our part when we have those same problems, those that we encounter and treat on a daily basis. A lot of the times, the stress faced by students and practitioners of medicine leads to a hypocrisy, in the sense that we cope with our stress in the very ways that we advise our patients not to. Whether it is excessive, poor eating habits, lack of exercise, smoking or drinking, etc, all of it is detrimental to our physical...

7 MCAT Study Tips For The Busy College Student

There is no getting around it, the MCAT may make you or break you. Yes, you are more than a number. Yes, your extracurricular activities count. But, in order to show the admissions board what you “bring to the table,” you must meet that schools minimum score requirement for the MCAT. The MCAT is scary, it is, but the test can be conquered with the right prep and planning. I’m here to help calm your nerves, offer you a pillar of hope during your time of studying, and give you some tips on how to make your study time more efficient. The most important thing you can do is have a schedule and try not to deviate from it. There are numerous websites and companies who have sample study plans to choose from that can make your planning easier or you can devise on your own. Most of the templates follow a general trend and look something like this: 6:30-8:00 am – Wake up, eat breakfast, exercise, shower 8:00-12:00 pm – Study for the MCAT (Prep with questions, read material etc.) 12:00-2:00 pm – Break 2:00-5:00 pm – MCAT prep 5:00-7:00 pm – Break 7:00-9:00 pm – MCAT prep 9:00-10:30 pm – Unwind, go to bed. This schedule makes the MCAT look not too scary am I right? Well, usually if you’re scheduled to take the MCAT, you’re in...

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