medschool

Divine Comedy On The Road: Dante’s 9 Circles of Hell, Commuters Edition

For commuters, medical students, or both: I like having real talks with people, heart to hearts; so let’s go heart to heart on the fact that commuting is hell. According to one of my favorite writers Dante Alighieri, there are nine circles of hell, a person is placed in one of them based upon their sins.  Have you sinned on your commute? Let’s find out. Limbo You and all the other zombies on that train, you know them.  Or maybe when your in your car pumping out casual jazz music to relax before a long day of surgeries and you look over and see all the other cars stuck in traffic with you, doing the same exact thing. Limbo. Stuck in endless casual peril.  Nothing bad is happening, but there sure is nothing good going on. Let’s be real there’s only so much smooth jazz you can listen to. Lust Now while defined differently then Dante had intended it to be, commuter lust does exist.  Jazz pumping in your ear, you can almost hear the sound of all the babies crying in your pediatric office later that day. Glancing out the window you see an open lane that leads right to the exit off the highway and you could be home free within 30 minutes.  Take that route, and you’ll end up in the second circle of commuter hell. Gluttony...

The Best Cover Letter Template For Doctors

Doctors are highly educated and skilled professionals, but they still need to write a cover letter to get hired. Cover letters are a great way of getting the attention of a hiring manager and expanding on things you were only able to touch on in your resume. A good cover letter should convince the reader that you know exactly what they’re looking for and can provide it, and a sample cover letter template can get you there. The first thing to remember when you’re writing your cover letter is that you are not rehashing your resume. Use your letter to expand on details you weren’t able to fit in your resume. Start with a summary that is basically a showcase of your most impressive abilities and qualifications. When you talk about the responsibilities you had at a previous facility, use action verbs rather than writing “responsible for,” or “duties included.” Get specific and provide examples, and if possible provide hard numbers. Give them some stats to give your potential employer a clear idea of how effective you are. “You should customize each cover letter to the position you’re applying for. Start off with a template if you like, but ensure you modify it and tailor it to the medical facility you’re applying to,” recommends Michael Acuna, cover letter editor at Ukwritings. Canned cover letters get thrown in the trash....

5 Best Ways to Spend your Lunch Break

You’ve only got an hour; do you make the most of it, or are you a lazy breaker? Find out as we discuss  the 5 best ways to spend your lunch break. 1.The Cultural Experience Enrichment. This one is more determined based upon where you work, but a quick cultural break is both fun and informative.  One of my favorite spots to visit was the Carnegie Art Museum which was two blocks down from my office. Nothing like a sandwich and a little Dali to go with it.  I felt myself being more relaxed but also enjoyed learning about the art. Now in NYC I enjoy walking through the parks and stopping to listen to music along the way or any pop up galleries.  The point is, enrich yourself during your lunch break. Simple searches online can point you towards a good cultural connection in your area. Who knows you may even make some friends with the same interests in the meantime. I guarantee you’ll find yourself not only being re energized but also have a sense of accomplishment after the lunch break which can be a great transition into the afternoon.     2. The Heavy Workout GRIND.  Nothing like a strong workout to get the middle of the day going again.  I would especially recommend doing this on a slow day. It’s excellent stress relief and personal gain....

Here’s A Resource I Used To Raise My Step 2 Score By 15 Points

In this post, we’re going to do something that’s really popular on the blog which is going over one of my top recommended resources. This resource has really helped me raise my Step 2 score by 25 points from my Step 1. It also raised my Step 2 score by 15 points over my goal score! What’s that resource? Dum roll… OnlineMedEd! In this post, I’m going to give a full OnlineMedEd review and insight into how I used it to study for shelf exams and my Step 2 CK exam! I know a lot of you guys know about OnlineMedEd and for the few of you don’t, I hope you stick around the whole post just to understand what this resource can offer you. For those of you guys that are familiar with OnlineMedEd, stick around because I’m going to go over how I used it to do well in my rotations, how I used it to do well on my Step 2 exam and  I’ll provide you guys a discount for any of you interested in their premium content, which I highly recommend.  If you’d like a video format of this post, check out the YouTube channel! So without any further ado, let’s get to the post! What Is OnlineMedEd? So quick intro into OnlineMedEd for any of you guys that aren’t familiar. It’s what I like to definitely consider...

How To Stay Productive During Long Study Days

As almost doctors, when we say we are “studying all day”, we really mean it. It’s definitely not an exaggeration, but our attention span lasts for about an hour before we start to procrastinate or lose focus. Many people have suggested working uninterrupted for 50-60 minutes and taking a 10-15 minute break during long study days to optimize productivity and brain energy. My years in medical school enabled me to perfect this strategy. When I try to multitask, I tend to flounder. I see friends and classmates trying to take notes but simultaneously on Facebook. I find that this is not the best use of time because not only are you sitting in class getting nothing done, but you have to repeat all the information you’ve tried to retain later on. It’s tough retaining the information from Step 1 and your sister’s cousin’s wedding photos. One huge tip for incoming almost doctors is to physically remove myself from my desk space or room where I study and do the following. The same can be said about studying in your bed. Only go to bed when you’re ready to sleep or take a nap. Creating these habits really help to train your mind. When I’m sitting at my desk, I know that I have to get my work done. If I am studying on my laptop in my bed, I know I will...

5 Steps to Writing The Perfect Doctor’s Resume

Writing a doctor’s resume requires precision. You have to compose, in just one or two pages, a summary of your education and career. It’s crucial not to leave the wrong information out, but you also need to avoid making it too long. There is no magic formula that will guarantee your resume is a perfect fit for a recruiter, but there are some basic guidelines that will improve your chances. Here are five steps to writing a doctor’s resume. Contact information For the most part, it doesn’t matter what order you put your sections in, except your contact information. This part needs to go first, and should be kept straightforward. State your name, your address, your email, LinkedIn profile, cell phone, pager, and fax, if you have one. Don’t forget to include your license or any other registration numbers.  Education and certifications If you’re a recent graduate, you’ll want to emphasize your education section, since you probably won’t have any work experience. State the medical school where you obtained your education, the location of the institution, your degree, and the year you obtained it. Be sure you double check your names and dates, because a recruiter absolutely will. You don’t want to come off as careless or neglectful. “Remember to include any internships you have completed, making sure to include where you worked and what your area of specialization...

Four Twitter Accounts Med Students Should Follow

Studying medicine is not exactly the easiest task to tackle. With the increasing proliferation of social media, many people continue to insist that the many social media platforms that exist today pose a pretty real distraction for medical students. However, it does not actually have to be this way, since but many people have now taken ownership of the various platforms out there so as to help medical students, rather than hinder them. Let us check out a few Twitter accounts to follow, that have been set up to effectively help medical students with their test reviews, studies, work ethic, or just about anything that will help them cope with everyday life as a student of medicine. The BS and fake news detector extraordinaire: @CaulfieldTim Tim Caulfield is a professor at the University of Alberta and teaches health law and science policy. His claim to fame is the fact that he always seems to know how to read scientific studies and distinguish the same from the ‘fluff’ that masquerades as real science. He has an intuitive knowledge of just when fake people are trying to make health claims that are either not backed by science or for that matter, are backed by pseudo-science at the very most. And what is more, he is definitely not afraid of calling out all such individuals who actually make such fake claims. A case in point being his very...

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