lifestyle

Four Ways to be Merry While Working on Christmas Day

Are you on a hospital shift this Christmas? It stinks, but you have to shake the feeling of irritation or it will hound you all day. Even though the occasion should be celebrated among loved ones don’t let the Grinch steal your joy. Look at the bright side: there are patients and coworkers in the same boat. Instead of being the sullen one, take it as an opportunity to show the true spirit of the season. How can you make the holiday work merry? Plan ahead The work rotation didn’t happen overnight, it was released in advance so plan ahead. Notify your family and make adjustments, rearrange some of your valued Christmas traditions to a time when you are not working. If you are scheduled on the day shift to celebrate on Christmas Eve. Kids don’t mind opening presents any time, so open these when you’re around and leave some behind for Christmas Day. You might find a co-worker who is willing to trade shifts. Trim your workplace Christmas celebration is about decoration that makes a place cheerful. Decorate the pantry or the nurse station it will bring a festive atmosphere that will bring joy to you and your coworkers. Have each coworker bring a decoration that they would use at home, it’ll go a long way. Remember, it’s the season to celebrate, enjoy the moment. Rub the Christmas spirit...

Five Medical Student New Year’s Resolutions

Now that 2017 is almost at its end, and the new year is waiting for us, it is the time to sit and reflect on what we have done the past year and what we want to do differently the coming year. For most of us, new year’s resolutions are all about losing weight, adopting more healthy eating habits and exercising, the case for medical students is different. Medical students lead a unique life and thus their new year’s resolutions ought to be different from others too. If you haven’t yet decided about what your new year’s resolutions are going to be for the coming year, here are some the medical student New Year’s resolutions. 1.    Make a Sleep Schedule One thing that tends to get affected the most when you are in the medical school is your sleep cycle. Early morning lectures and late night study sessions lead to irregular sleeping hours. The cycle leaves you tired and you are unable to concentrate, which is the basic thing you need to do when in medical school. As your new year’s resolution for 2018, you should try to sleep well, and most importantly at normal hours. Your mind and body needs rest. Thus, make a resolution that you will make a sleep schedule and try to stick by it. 2.    Preview the Materials before Class We all have made...

How to Make the Most out of Working During Christmas and The Holidays

The holidays are a time when people make happy memories with their loved ones and give presents. However, it is not always fun and games for the brave souls who work in the medical field. Medical emergencies don’t take the day off and neither do the doctors, nurses and other health care providers who can manage them. Most are on active duty during the holidays even when others have the day off. Across the country, thousands of HCPs will be spending Christmas in health care facilities. Those who do return home will be on call for emergencies which they have to drop everything to attend to. For these professionals, finding balance between their career obligations and family can be the biggest stressor of the year for them. So how do they do it? Here are some ways HCPs across the country are making their holiday season as jolly as they can without ignoring their duties. Bringing festive cheer to work Just because they don’t have to be home for the holidays doesn’t mean they cannot bring the holiday cheer with them. It is not uncommon to see hospitals and clinics decorated for Christmas with decked out halls twinkling with lights. Each employee brings their own ideas to the table not only for themselves, but also for the patients who are nursing their own ailments in the hospital. This speaks...

Giving Thanks During The Holidays

The holidays are all about gratitude and thanks. I can’t help but think about the people and experiences that have shaped my academic year and helped me grow as a health care professional. This year, I was lucky to travel to new places for district and national conferences. I am grateful for the students and colleagues on the district and national leadership who planned and executed these large-scale professional events despite having their own exams and academic commitments. Thank you also to the speakers who left their families and loved ones and work obligations to attend these conferences and inspire us and motivate us to be better professionals. I am thankful for the staff members that work in the supply room. Despite the daily demands of maintenance and upkeep for a brand new lab, these two women never show stress or frustration when students ask them the same question multiple times. I feel like I always turn to them when I have a problem whether or not they know how to solve it. I am very lucky to have made new, loyal friends in a new city when I started my program. There are a handful of friends who get me through the day, every day, and make the stress of school a little more enjoyable. Recently, a friend of mine shared traditional Malaysian food for lunch because she...

Four Qualities that Unlock Positive Mental and Emotional Health

The journey to becoming a doctor is a marathon, not a sprint, we are often told. I am three years into a potentially 8-13 yearlong journey toward becoming the physician and researcher that I aspire to be. In this short glimpse into what will undoubtedly be a challenging and rewarding experience, I have learned there are a few important qualities that every student should obtain – both to be a better future doctor and a happier student in the process. These traits have been picked up by seeing my friends who possess them, mentors and advisors that dispense wisdom to me, and through self-evaluation. While many of the qualities are easily obtainable and maintainable, sometimes the hardest part about self-reflection and improvement is taking the time to do it! In 2018, one of my goals is to practice self-reflection more often as a way to monitor my mental and emotional health. Here are some of the qualities that I think make life better, happier, and easier. Humility It is so easy to get caught up in the competitive, sometimes cut-throat nature that fosters itself among high-achieving and highly successful students. In these times, I have found it imperative to practice humility among your accomplished peers. While this quality is often resisted because of the need for self-validation, I believe the best feeling of accomplishment is in the celebration of...

How Much Could Nurse Practitioners Earn?

Becoming a nurse practitioner may offer a number of perks, which, depending on the employer, can include flexible work schedules, childcare services, and educational benefits.[i] While these can be great benefits, many students considering whether or not to pursue a career as a nurse practitioner want to know how much could nurse practitioners earn. According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the average median salary for nurse practitioners across the country is $107,460 a year or $51.67 per hour.[ii] But those figures can range depending on the industry, the work environment, and where you live. This infographic from GradSchools.com, the authority resource on everything about graduate schools and graduate degrees on the web, breaks down the highest paying states and metropolitan areas, the top paying industries and work environments, and how much you might make as a nurse practitioner in your area. In the coming years, there may even be more opportunities for you enter this profession. In fact, the BLS projects the number of nurse practitioners will increase 36% for the ten years 2016 to 2026.[iii] So, if you’re considering pursuing a career as a nurse practitioner or if you have any questions about the potential earnings, click on the infographic for all the answers. How much could Nurse Practitioners Earn Courtesy of gradschools.com [i] bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/nurse-anesthetists-nurse-midwives-and-nurse-practitioners.htm#tab-5 [ii] https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/nurse-anesthetists-nurse-midwives-and-nurse-practitioners.htm#tab-1 [iii]...

How To Handle Long-Distance Relationships in Medical School

This month alone, I heard about five classmates who recently broke up with their significant other due to distance. Relationships, in general, are hard let alone maintaining a special bond with someone miles away. FaceTime just can’t replace being with the one you love in real life. And each subsequent year of school comes with its own stressors which in turn weighs heavily on the relationship, especially with someone who is not a student. But, despite the challenges, long distance relationships can absolutely last in school. I’ve frequently heard others say that long distance relationships never work. I think this generalization is far too extreme. A relationship, after all, is between two people. And if those two people are both willing to commit and to sacrifice, then the relationship is bound to last. For those who prefer to focus on the positive aspects of a long-distance relationship, it can a reliable source of stress relief and a much needed escape from the monotony of studying and test-taking. Knowing you can pick up the phone at the end of the day to hear a loving, supportive voice helps to make harsh faculty feedback less hurtful, to make a bad grade less important, to make endless studying more manageable. Spending most of your 20’s as a financially dependent student can be defeating. Being in a relationship can give you a strong...