lifestyle

4 Great Podcasts That’ll Make You Laugh, Cry, and Maybe Think

4. JAMA Audio Commentary Catherine DeAngelis, Editor-in-Chief of JAMA, summarizes and comments on each issue of the journal. So you get the latest medical news straight from the source delivered right to your tympanic membrane … and your brain, of course.   3. NPR’s all songs considered  For the music lovers out there, all songs considered brings you the freshest new music in a wide range of genres that may indirectly lead to a pissed off roommate.   2. The Johns Hopkins Medicine News Roundup Another awesome source of medical news, this podcast covers the latest medical headlines of the week. It’s perfect for up-to-date, well informed medical professionals like yourselves.   1. Radiolab This is one of my all-time favorites. Hosts Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich craft a show that weaves personal narrative and some fascinating ideas in science for  incredible hour-long podcasts. So take a good long sip of the sweet nectar of knowledge.   Featured image taken from Flickr |...

How to Distinguish Yourself When Applying for Gap Year Jobs

There is a lot of pressure to get a job after graduating college, and it’s especially tough when you are trying to find one for only a year between graduating and beginning medical school. If you’re a recent grad and scrambling to land a job or you’ve been accepted for a position that you don’t think will be worth your while, check out this unique way of developing your resume and it might just be your ticket to the perfect, dream job! The website Sumry allows you to “tell your story” in a non-traditional way and “showcase your personality as well as your goals”. Share your Sumry resume with us!     Featured image...

The 9 Things I Learned During Intern Year

1. The first two times your pager goes off are exciting! …every time after that is progressively more gut-wrenching.   2. Whoever your co-intern is will be your new BFF …or your most hated enemy.   3. There is an inverse relationship between amount of crap in your pocket and level of training   4. When you give a presentation, everyone in the room will know more about the topic than you do.   5. You will never escape the hospital…even in sleep.    6. Free food is the greatest joy in life!   7. White coats stay white for ~5 minutes.   8. There is no such thing as privacy…even in the bathroom..even with the door closed.   9. When in doubt, tylenol or stool-softeners will usually buy you some breathing room.   See the original cartoon and more by Dr. Fizzy.  ...

Should Doctors Get MBAs?

Arlen Meyers, MD, MBA, President and CEO, Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, discusses the benefits of an MBA for physicians. He explains each of the vital 4 C’s offered by MBA programs: 1) Connections 2) Credentials 3) Credibility 4)...

8 Ways Working in Medicine Has Made Me An Annoying Girlfriend

Relationships are hard work enough; but throw in the complexities of pursuing a demanding medical career and it can feel impossible at times. Luckily, I have a pretty solid relationship. . .despite the fact that sometimes, my job makes me pretty obnoxious. 1. Anatomical terms roll off my tongue when I attempt dirty talk. “Your mandible is looking really chiseled today, baby.”   2. There’s a medical explanation for everything. Everything. I get up off the bed and stumble after a romp. Boyfriend has a smug grin. “Don’t get too excited that’s just my orthostatic hypotension.”   3. My vacation ideas aren’t usually very good. “Let’s go to Philadelphia.” “Okay, what do you want to do in Philly?” “Mütter Museum.” “I like museums. What kind of museum is it?” “Uh. . .a medical one.” “. . .” “. . .”   4. I don’t give good directions. “No, no, laterally.”   5. I’m too literal to appreciate Valentine’s Day. “This doesn’t look like a heart at all. At best it’s an antiquated and crude rendering of a woman’s buttocks.” “It’s the best heart I could draw!” “Do I need to dig out Gray’s Anatomy again?”   6. I ruin movies and tv shows. “What on earth does he think he’s going to do with that banana bag? Really? Where he’s poking around right there? Acting. Not gonna find a...

5 Keys to Maintaining a Healthy Relationship in Med School

Maintaining a healthy relationship with a significant other can be tough stuff. Add the stress of medical school to the mix and you can make a difficult situation nearly impossible. But ain’t love worth it? I certainly think so. My story? I met the love of my life while in high school. I went to college in Connecticut and he in North Carolina. As if it were not enough that we spent all of college apart, we remained hundreds of miles away from one another while pursuing our graduate degrees. I (as you probably figured out) began medical school, and much to my dismay, soon learned that it significantly complicated the already difficult battle of dating long distance. The amount of time we had to chat everyday dwindled as my workload surmounted. I found it increasingly difficult to devote m y attention to much outside of school. Clearly, I was not alone. As the year went on, I witnessed most of my fellow classmates’ relationships burn to a crisp, a reality that I found far from inspiring. Fortunately for me, our story ended happily. Four years after beginning medical school, I married m y high school sweetheart and am now living the happy life I have always wanted for m yself. It wasn’t always easy, but all good things are worth the wait, and needless to say- the occasional struggle....

Beat Late Night Zombie Eyes With F.lux

Consider yourself a night-owl studier? Medical students’ eyes tend to be fixated on the bright hue of laptop screens throughout the day, producing Zombie Eye Syndrome (not officially on Step 1… yet). With the most study-intensive period of medical school, board preparation, just a few months away, there’s an easy way to help reduce eye-strain during those long nights with your First Aid.   F.lux takes control of your computers display colors and adjusts them to mirror the lighting of the room around you. In the morning, f.lux has your laptop displays its natural bright colors, but at night f.lux adjusts the color scheme to a calmer hue in order to take the strain off the eyes. From a physiologic basis, the theory is that reducing the bright light exposure to your eyes at night can help restore the natural balance of melatonin secreted by the pineal gland, but there aren’t any studies to back f.lux’s effect on this. From a personal perspective, I can’t study at night without f.lux on my laptop, and even briefly switching off the app at night produces a noticeable difference in screen brightness. As a free app, there’s no downside to giving f.lux a try and seeing if it helps benefit your eyes from those long nights of studying.     Featured image from Flickr...