lifestyle

5 Ways How E-Learning Can Simplify Your Medical Studies

E-learning has brought about a great revolution in almost all fields of study, and none more so than in the medical fraternity. Learning from online medical courses has opened up new ways of studying, and brought about more opportunities for students to understand the subject material in a completely novel fashion. Traditional education is fraught with multiple limitations; chief amongst them being their shortage of resources at hand to teach a subject, as well as their relative inflexibility. The high cost and busy classrooms of many medical schools forbid effective learning in an aspiring student, killing their enthusiasm and the joy of learning that makes medicine beautiful, but, the rapid advances of digital technology throughout the world has led to a proliferation of services offering replacement, or supplemental, medical courses online. This has rapidly advanced the learning opportunities for medical students around the world and simplified medical studies. The following article lists the various ways in which online medical courses have simplified the task of delivering high-quality medical education to any willing learner. E-Learning gives students guidance Medicine is vast and often students get lost in that vastness without the right learning and guidance. Good e-learning courses offer an effective way out to master the medical program by providing a learning schedule. Moreover, keeping record of the students’ performance and measuring progress is essential to help students mastering the...

Should Nurses Date Doctors? 6 Reasons Why They Shouldn’t

Most nurses have seen the Grey’s Anatomy episode where Rose, the nurse, and Derek, the dreamy surgeon, take their relationship to the next level. But it’s not that simple. Nurses rarely sneak off to on-call rooms in the middle of a shift. In fact, hospital call rooms have very small, squeaky beds and very thin walls! Doctors used to marry nurses — it was a more common practice in previous generations. Now, nurses are choosing NOT to date doctors. Here’s a list of reasons why you may not want to either. 1. Nurses shouldn’t date doctors because they have crazy hours Typically, nurses enter into relationships with first year interns or residents. After all, most fellows or attending physicians are engaged or married. Interns are assigned quite possibly the worst schedule and on-call rotation in the hospital. So, a relationship can be tough. At a facility I’m familiar with, interns in the ICU and cardiology are on call every third day and cover one week of night call per month. Residents (second and third years) are on call every fourth night. My advice: avoid dating medical trainees. That is, unless you want to coordinate your crazy hours with those of the intern or resident. 2. Nurses shouldn’t date doctors because you get the looks, gossip, and questions When a nurse and a doctor date, it becomes everybody’s business. Coworkers feel invested in these relationships and...

4 Medicine & Science Podcasts to Check Out

Radiolab Radiolab is the holy grail of science podcasts. It’s consistently ranked in the top five on iTunes, and for good reason. Hosted by Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich, the two-time Peabody Award-winner uses sound effects and music to bring great science reporting to life. Often, Abumrad and Krulwich will invite a guest to talk about the issues and raise questions that you probably hadn’t thought to ask. If you’re interested in listening, check out these two episodes: “Update: CRISPR” and “Radiolab Extra: Henrietta Lacks.” The Show About Science The Show About Science is hosted by a six-year-old—yes, you read that right. Nate Butkus started the show when he was five years old, and he’s serious about science. In each episode, Nate invites a guest to talk about their research. For example, MIT’s Kevin Esvelt recently came on the show to talk about gene editing. The great thing about Nate’s podcast is that guests often explain things as if they were talking to a six year old (which they actually are), and this makes science much easier to understand for listeners. Nate already has the quite the following after 28 episodes—check him out on Ellen: Hidden Brain NPR’s Hidden Brain is one of my favorite podcasts. Host Shankar Vedantam uses a blend of science and storytelling to uncover how our unconscious drives our behavior. Vedantam focuses on large-scope issues such as the...

Make the Right Choice: Best Paying Healthcare Careers in 2017

Choosing to go into healthcare has always been an admirable career decision, but you need money to make it through every day. The industry pays well and might be the motivation behind some individuals choosing to take this route. If you are going to study to become a professional, you might as well do it in the direction of the highest paying jobs. Here is a list of the healthcare careers that could help you earn good money. Surgeons A surgeon has an earning potential of around $187 000, which is not a small amount of money at all. It does take some time to become a surgeon, but I would say that it is completely worth it. Perhaps it’s time to work on that residency personal statement. Dentists I have seen a lot of jokes going around stating that dentists are people who failed at becoming doctors. Well, if their salaries is anything to go by, I’d reconsider that joke. Dentists can earn around $155 000, which is enough to live a comfortable lifestyle. Pharmacists Prescribing medicines to patients is a very important part of the healthcare industry and without pharmacists, the industry would not function at all. With earnings around $120 000 and many jobs available for pharmacists, this would be a wise career choice. Podiatrists Podiatrists are usually required to do their residencies earlier than some physicians. Research some...

How Much Your Health Affects Your Wallet

Smoking, fast food, and lack of exercise can both affect your wellness and your money. Learn how much bad health affects your wallet.  Creating positive health changes in patients can be a difficult task. Once habits are ingrained, they become harder to break. Exposing more pain points for these habits can change a person’s viewpoint and lead them to change. Physical inactivity and poor diet choices continue to surge, and a new motive is needed to help people improve their health. Smoking has been one of the biggest health concerns for decades now, but did you know smoking can cost a person between $6,500 and $13,500 a year? The average cost of a cigarette averages out to be around 31 cents, which comes out to $1,358 a year. The hidden costs come in the form of higher insurance premiums and loss of insurance credits. The total cost of smoking with these factors adds up to a much greater financial sacrifice. The increase in fast food consumption has also made for a costlier lifestyle. Consumers spend an average of $1,200 a year on fast food which can lead up to an additional $5,500 a year in healthcare costs. The caloric increase not only leads to weight gain, but is generally coupled with an inactive lifestyle as well. Physical inactivity, according to the World Health Organization, is the 4th leading risk factor...

Chef Uy Presents: Blackberry Chia Parfait

Natalie Uy is a resident in Internal Medicine who loves to eat and doodle. Her food blog, Obsessive Cooking Disorder, is a collection of recipes she made during her study breaks and stories on my medical / life adventures. Here is her recipe on how to prepare Blackberry Chia Parfait. Hi everyone, I’m officially done with intern year! Yay! I finished off intern year with VA hospital nights which can be exhausting – if you’ve never been jolted awake from pages at 3am (or worse, hammer pages, which is non stop back to back paging), you’re not missing out on anything. Sometimes you’ll even get 2 or 3 pagers going off simultaneously (“Oh nice, they’re harmonizing” – my med school surgeon attending). While finishing intern year is always a cause for celebration (goodbye waking up earlier to pre-round on patients, endless note-writing, and answering constant pages), I can’t help but have mixed feelings about stepping up to second year, since now I’ll be in charge of the team when it comes to running the team, making decision and handling emergencies. I’m going to miss the ability of saying, “Wait, let me ask my senior…” Although I’m know I’ve learned so much intern year, I still feel like there’s so much I don’t know (I have no idea how doctors managed without internet -all of our medical resources are there, from looking up medication doses...

The Reasons Why Sleep Matters

My personal experience has taught me that consistently getting decent sleep is THE most important factor in my overall well-being—more than relationships, exercise, diet, money, or anything else. Let me list the reasons why sleep matters. Obviously I don’t currently, and likely never will (except maybe during research sabbatical), get 8 hours of sleep 7 days per week. But I always get as much sleep as possible. This means that sleep almost always comes before my husband, family, friends, studying, drinking, TV, and whatever else keeps me away from my bed.  (Of course there are exceptions.) A mentor once told me, “Whenever you say ‘yes’ to something, you’re saying ‘no’ to something else.” Sometimes saying ‘yes’ to sleep means my life appears pretty boring from the outside. For example, when I was a 4th year med student on my surgery sub-internship, I woke up at 4:00am every day and usually didn’t get home until 7pm or later. When I got home, I ate dinner while I talked to my husband, showered, and then got in bed around 8:00pm. This was also in July, so I was actually in bed before the sun set every night. This sounds like a really pathetic existence, but I swear I was happy. Giving up some time with my husband after work in favor of getting enough sleep was worth it because I wasn’t...

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