global

TED Talks For Food Lovers #8: Teach Every Child About Food

Ignorance is one of the first concerns in encountering a global issue. According to the TED prize winner Jamie Oliver, obesity needs to be targeted with this very angle in mind, going even further by incorporating childhood learning and understanding in order to help prevent the issue from precipitating in the first place.     Diet and health are highly interdependent. The food people eat over the course of a lifetime often plays a huge role in determining many of the ailments they incur. Referring to some recent exploration into the field of microbiomics, the large quantity and variety of bacteria in our body may likewise be acutely as well as chronically transforming due to the food we eat and the changes we make to our diets. Lastly, for aspiring medical personnel, quick food sources such as cold pizzas, Chipotle veggie bowls, and espresso shots often make up our daily sustenance. What effect do these have on our health?   Over the course of the next several articles, I would like to take you all on a run through some of the most interesting TED talks on food, some quite interesting and others downright genius. As you watch these videos, reflect on the close ties between nutrition and medicine, and what we can due as future clinicians to best counsel our patients in the face of changing food consumption...

This Isn’t Your Average Toy – The Mine Kafon

Inspired by the makeshift wind-powered toys of his Afghan childhood, Massoud Hassani is on the verge of something special.   The Mine Kafon is a low-cost wind-powered mine detonator with the appearance of a giant, spiky-armed tumbleweed. Check out his Kickstarter campaign. As a child living in war-torn Afghanistan, Massoud Hassani was well acquainted with the devastating nature of war and the long, perhaps endless road to recovery. Landmines concealed underground are a ubiquitous threat to countless communities in Afghanistan. A report from the Electronic Mine Information Network states that “over one million Afghans (3.7% of the total population) live within 500 meters of landmine contaminated areas.” Growing up, Hassani was a tinkerer; of particular interest to him was the creation of wind-powered toys, which he would race with other children in the windy, desert outskirts of Kabul. His interest in engineering led him to pursue a degree at the Design Academy Eindhoven.   Out of this tumultuous past sprung the idea for the Mine Kafon, a wind-powered mobile constructed from biodegradable plastic and bamboo. Hassani’s creation has caught the eyes and imaginations of many, and the prototype has been exhibited all across the globe. It was exhibited by The Museum of Modern Art in March of 2013.   Featured image is a screenshot from the video...

TED Talks For Food Lovers #3: Aquaculture

Well, I promised you something offbeat, so here it is. In this TED Talk by Chef Dan Barber, listen to his discovery of a delicious fish that he could bring and keep on the menu for those salivating mouths, incorporating the novelty of a revolutionary farming method in Spain. In the future, this new aquaculture could give us a sustainable way to keep fish in our diets, as well as our future patients’ diets.     Diet and health are highly interdependent. The food people eat over the course of a lifetime often plays a huge role in determining many of the ailments they incur. Referring to some recent exploration into the field of microbiomics, the large quantity and variety of bacteria in our body may likewise be acutely as well as chronically transforming due to the food we eat and the changes we make to our diets. Lastly, for aspiring medical personnel, quick food sources such as cold pizzas, Chipotle veggie bowls, and espresso shots often make up our daily sustenance. What effect do these have on our health?   Over the course of the next several articles, I would like to take you all on a run through some of the most interesting TED talks on food, some quite interesting and others downright genius. As you watch these videos, reflect on the close ties between nutrition and...

Healthcare Around The World #10: Brazil

Finally, we end our series of healthcare around the world with Brazil. Though I can’t believe the summer Olympics have already come and gone, I remember leading up to the event there was a lot of controversy surrounding how the country’s healthcare system would be able to support a huge influx of people from all over the world. After the fact, it seems that there was no problem. How exactly did they handle it? Still, that doesn’t mean the system is perfect.     To at least some degree, we are all aware of the dynamics around healthcare in the United States, centering around the struggles to make services affordable, ensuring equal access to care, and juggling the politics of party-line views between private and federally-sponsored healthcare (with everything along the middle of that spectrum). But how do other countries around the world offer healthcare to its people? Can their models provide us with some insight into how to modify our system to make it better?   Over the course of the next several articles, we will be viewing some interesting clips on the general model of healthcare in select countries across the globe. While this sampling is in no way representative of all possible models out there, it undoubtedly provides us with intriguing information to ponder.   Also, a disclaimer before we start. Some of the videos may...

Healthcare Around The World #9: Ethiopia

Transitioning from countries such as the United States, England, and France, developing countries such as Ethiopia carry a whole new set of challenges. The conversation shifts from long-term sustainability to establishing a system that can have the right resources and allow people equal access. Considering the relatively low standard of living across of country, Ethiopians require care that is highly affordable. As shown in this video, several steps need to be taken in order to even start to overcome the struggle against healthcare challenges.     To at least some degree, we are all aware of the dynamics around healthcare in the United States, centering around the struggles to make services affordable, ensuring equal access to care, and juggling the politics of party-line views between private and federally-sponsored healthcare (with everything along the middle of that spectrum). But how do other countries around the world offer healthcare to its people? Can their models provide us with some insight into how to modify our system to make it better?   Over the course of the next several articles, we will be viewing some interesting clips on the general model of healthcare in select countries across the globe. While this sampling is in no way representative of all possible models out there, it undoubtedly provides us with intriguing information to ponder.   Also, a disclaimer before we start. Some of the...

Healthcare Around The World #8: Norway

Second only to the United States, Norway spends the most per person on healthcare. Given its government-sponsored system resulting from high taxation coupled with long waiting times, the country has grappled with the issues with moderate success. However, the question again arises as with New Zealand: What if we were to try a government-sponsored system for a country as large as the United States?     To at least some degree, we are all aware of the dynamics around healthcare in the United States, centering around the struggles to make services affordable, ensuring equal access to care, and juggling the politics of party-line views between private and federally-sponsored healthcare (with everything along the middle of that spectrum). But how do other countries around the world offer healthcare to its people? Can their models provide us with some insight into how to modify our system to make it better?   Over the course of the next several articles, we will be viewing some interesting clips on the general model of healthcare in select countries across the globe. While this sampling is in no way representative of all possible models out there, it undoubtedly provides us with intriguing information to ponder.   Also, a disclaimer before we start. Some of the videos may be presenting biased opinions about the superiority of certain healthcare systems. My intention is to simply deliver the...

Healthcare Around The World #7: China

How does healthcare work in China? As shown in the video below, the Chinese healthcare system as reported several years ago was marked by many flaws, including a government-sponsored plan with high out-of-pocket costs, more care given than needed to increase charges, and undertrained providers. Currently, the Chinese government is devoting greater focus to shore up its dysfunctional healthcare system in order to make it more effective as well as more affordable for its citizens.     To at least some degree, we are all aware of the dynamics around healthcare in the United States, centering around the struggles to make services affordable, ensuring equal access to care, and juggling the politics of party-line views between private and federally-sponsored healthcare (with everything along the middle of that spectrum). But how do other countries around the world offer healthcare to its people? Can their models provide us with some insight into how to modify our system to make it better?   Over the course of the next several articles, we will be viewing some interesting clips on the general model of healthcare in select countries across the globe. While this sampling is in no way representative of all possible models out there, it undoubtedly provides us with intriguing information to ponder.   Also, a disclaimer before we start. Some of the videos may be presenting biased opinions about the superiority...