global

Is alcohol now a better pain reliever than Acetaminophen‬‬?

Well here’s something to drink to: a new study from the University of Greenwich’s Journal of Pain suggests that alcohol might be a better pain reliever than Acetaminophen‬‬ and other common pain relievers. The study suggests that alcohol contained analgesic, or pain relieving effects. According to their researchers, a blood-alcohol content (BAC) of .08%, or three to four standard drinks, provides a small increase in pain threshold. The research also suggests that “higher blood alcohol content is associated with greater analgesia”, and “a moderate decrease in pain ratings was also observed”. From the Journal of Pain study, titled Analgesic Effects of Alcohol: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Controlled Experimental Studies in Healthy Participants: Despite the long-standing belief in the analgesic properties of alcohol, experimental studies have produced mixed results. This meta-analysis aimed to clarify whether alcohol produces a decrease in experimentally-induced pain and to determine the magnitude of any such effect. PubMed, PsycINFO, and Embase databases were searched from inception until April 21, 2016 for controlled studies examining the effect of quantified dosages of alcohol on pain response to noxious stimulation. Some evidence of publication bias emerged, but statistical correction methods suggested minimal impact on effect size. Taken together, findings suggest that alcohol is an effective analgesic that delivers clinically-relevant reductions in ratings of pain intensity, which could explain alcohol misuse in those with persistent pain despite its potential consequences for...

You Have A Lot To Be Grateful For

There are things that those of us in the developed world are not forced to consider. Those “things” happen to be the often deadly diseases that are still very prevalent throughout developing nations. The same diseases, meanwhile, are virtually gone in many developed nations. Developed nations enjoy early access to vaccines, largely accessible healthcare, and cleaner conditions. Traveling outside of your country can actually be dangerous: different places can really differ down to the microbe. Here are some diseases that, while you may not be likely to see, still plague the developed world. Hopefully this reminds you just how good you have it.   1. Malaria     2. Polio   3. Yellow Fever     4. Measles     5. Tetanus      6. Small Pox Small Pox was included here to show that it is possible to completely eliminate a disease. Small Pox is a disease that no one anywhere, developed nation or developing nation, has to worry about. In 1979, after aggressive action by several countries and the World Health Organization, Small Pox was declared eradicated....

Have Medical Degree – Will Travel

        Featured From Gap Medics Blog   Featured Image:...

Diagnosing Genetic Disorders with Facial Recognition Technology

With advancing technology, you can see a doctor from home using FaceTime or send a pic of your mole for a cancer diagnosis. And now, the same technology that automatically tags your photos on Facebook can help doctors diagnose rare genetic diseases.   Facial recognition technology dates all the way back to 1964, when computer programmers starting teaching their computers how to recognize human faces. Early operations could process about 40 pictures an hour in an attempt to match similar features using coordinates between pupils, outside corners of the eyes, hairline, etc. Early attempts struggled to cope with variations from photo to photo if the subject wasn’t posed in exactly the same position. In the mid-2000s, the Face Recognition Grand Challenge was sponsored by the FBI and Department of Homeland Security, among others, to bring attention and innovation to facial recognition technology.   Image: Source   Now, researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) have produced software that uses facial recognition technology to help diagnose DiGeorge syndrome. A rare genetic disease, DiGeorge syndrome is caused by a defect in chromosome 22. Although its effects vary from person to person, the syndrome can result in cleft palate, low calcium levels, heart defects and a weakened immune system. There is no cure, but early interventions can improve the patient’s outlook through relevant treatments.   The breakthrough is particularly important...

Infographic: Future Pandemics

Featured From Gap Medics Blog   As predictions go, pandemics are one of the scariest. Inevitable and with a huge unknown quantity, pandemics are something that even the World Health Organisation are urging people not to ignore, with the frightening forecast that there will be, “sometime in the future, an event that will kill…somewhere between 80 and 90 million people.”   There are lots of hypothetical situations and theories about where a virus will come from, what it will do and the devastation it will have. In fact, there are already scientists working on vaccines that the human population may need in the event of a global outbreak. There’s actually a World Health Organisation Global Vaccine Plan!   In this infographic, we take a look at some of the possible pandemics of the future and how you can best prepare yourself against the spread of germs....

How Global Health Can Help With Student Loans

Match Day may have come and gone, with fourth year students having visions of residency dancing through their heads. Unfortunately, no such vision would be complete without the hulking monstrosity that is our loan burden. The Committee on Global and Public Health within the AMA-MSS has put together a piece about ways to address the elephant in the room, but first, credit where credit is due. This article would not have been possible without the work of Van Kenyon, Chethan Rao, Sagar Chawla, Morgan Hardy, Nafeeza Hussain, Josh Eikenberg, Allen Young, Tyson Schwab, Brian Yagi, and Stephen Belmustakov under the leadership of Divya Sharma (Chair), and Jessica Peterson (Vice Chair).   Now let’s dive in: With the ever-increasing interest in global health, students looking to assist international health care efforts may be searching for means to obtain financial support for their work.   Medical Scholars Program from the Infectious Diseases Society of America The Medical Scholars Program was established in 2002 and has awarded over 500 medical students interested in the sub-specialty of infectious diseases the opportunity to pursue independent clinical or research activities outside their institutional program and explore the field of infectious diseases. It helps attract the best and brightest to the field by giving medical students a first-hand look at the challenges and opportunities of working in infectious disease. Projects should be classified as belonging to...

Tips for Getting the Most Out of Field Visits

By Alanna Shaikh Flickr | ILRI Here’s how to get the most out of your field visits: 1) Don’t call them missions. That’s just offensive. It’s a field visit, a site visit, or a trip out to see your programs. Unless you are trying to convert people to the one true faith of your choice, it’s not a mission. Calling it one implies that you’re heading out there to teach the locals what’s what. You are heading out there so the locals can teach you. Don’t forget it. 2) Always keep this in mind: your two primary goals in any trip are to learn more about your programs, and more about the context they operate in. You may have specific tasks to achieve on your trip, but if you fail at those your trip still has value as long as you learn. Flickr | highersights 3) Listen. Talk to people. Talk to your staff. Talk to your beneficiaries. Talk to government officials and community leaders, and taxi drivers. It doesn’t take probing questions, or special insight on your part, just a willingness to sit down and hear what people have to say. Pack your schedule with as many meetings as you can humanly stand. By listening, you learn how your project and organization is perceived, what your community thinks of you, and what your own staff is thinking. You...