global

Top 5 Reasons Why Studying Medicine in Israel is Sababa (Hebrew for: Awesome)

Many people often would study abroad for medical school, especially if they want a different experience. Dahlia Pasik lists the best reasons why studying medicine in Israel is a unique and fulfilling experience.  Kosher Food. And a lot of it – Whether you are Jewish, Italian, Christian, or perhaps a bit of all three, there is one thing Israel is in no shortage of for one to enjoy – and that’s kosher food. Sure, you will likely find kosher products distributed amongst various supermarkets in countries in the USA and in Canada, but not close to the proportion that Israel has to offer. So whether it’s falafel, shawarma, or just a good taste of steamy fresh potato kugel (Yiddish for pudding) you’re craving, the Holy Land has got you covered. More Hands-On Medical Experience – Israeli culture is quite different than typical American/Canadian culture. I remember when I was a premed and was looking to shadow a doctor in a locally based hospital in NY, there were so many permission forms to fill out and medical records to be tracked, I might have been better off just never shadowing. Once approved to follow this particular doctor, the hospital was so stringent about non-medical professionals being able to observe medically related procedures, I probably would’ve gained more exposure from watching a few melodramatic Greys Anatomy episodes. Well, Israel is different in...

What The Most Futuristic Hospitals Have That Others Don’t

Technology has certainly made great advancements in medicine, and our friends at GapMedics provide a glimpse into the most futuristic hospitals in the world. Featured on the list are: University of Missouri Health System: University Hospital in Columbia, Missouri; Hackensack University Medical Center in Hackensack, New Jersey; Wooridul Spine Hospital in Seoul, South Korea; Vale Hospital in Hensol, South Wales, United Kingdom; and Asklepios Klinik Barmbek in Hamberg, Germany. Many leading hospitals are already making profound changes and improvements that could not even have been imagined a decade ago. Science and technology working together are bringing hope and progress to patients and medical staff alike. In this infographic, we take a look at some of the most futuristic hospitals in the world, where state of the art equipment and high tech medical care is advancing healthcare across the world. What does the future of hospitals look? Some are incredibly optimistic, with hospitals developing more specialized technologies and groups to optimize their systems and to tread as many patients as possible. Even in 2015, we saw developments in prosthetics. Futurism reported that by 2030, hospitals may be a thing of the past: Predictions from the co-chair of the World Economic Forum’s Future Council, Melanie Walker, say we’ll soon enter a post-hospital world due to advances in personalized medicine, health monitoring, and nanotechnology. New and evolving technologies in medical science convince Walker we’ll live...

From SXSW to SHM: Our Tour to Promote Value Conversations Between Doctors & Patients

At a movie premiere for the new Terrence Malick flick, “Song to Song”, Ryan Gosling, Michael Fassbender, and Rooney Mara walked the red carpet to flashing cameras and screaming fans in front of the famous Paramount Theatre in Austin. The next day, down the street, to a lot less fanfare, our Costs of Care team – Neel Shah and both of us – took the stage at the annual SXSW festival for own version of a premiere. We were about to step out of the normal medical conference crowd (i.e. no screaming fans but some with #pinksocks on) and see for the first time if videos we made depicting scenarios of doctors and patients confronting healthcare costs would translate to the real world. Would it work, or would the critics, like with the “Song to Song” premier, give us a rotten tomato? Luckily, we had a very positive response, and our session was dubbed one of the most interactive on Twitter and even garnered a tremendously generous “Best Picture” nod from the healthcare round-up by Medical Marketing & Media (not exactly the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science, but we will take it!). In our first “public”-facing debut, it was clear that the public increasingly wants physicians to address costs of care with them – conversations that have been historically controversial. The patients in the room wanted to...

Is alcohol now a better pain reliever than Acetaminophen‬‬?

Well here’s something to drink to: a new study from the University of Greenwich’s Journal of Pain suggests that alcohol might be a better pain reliever than Acetaminophen‬‬ and other common pain relievers. The study suggests that alcohol contained analgesic, or pain relieving effects. According to their researchers, a blood-alcohol content (BAC) of .08%, or three to four standard drinks, provides a small increase in pain threshold. The research also suggests that “higher blood alcohol content is associated with greater analgesia”, and “a moderate decrease in pain ratings was also observed”. From the Journal of Pain study, titled Analgesic Effects of Alcohol: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Controlled Experimental Studies in Healthy Participants: Despite the long-standing belief in the analgesic properties of alcohol, experimental studies have produced mixed results. This meta-analysis aimed to clarify whether alcohol produces a decrease in experimentally-induced pain and to determine the magnitude of any such effect. PubMed, PsycINFO, and Embase databases were searched from inception until April 21, 2016 for controlled studies examining the effect of quantified dosages of alcohol on pain response to noxious stimulation. Some evidence of publication bias emerged, but statistical correction methods suggested minimal impact on effect size. Taken together, findings suggest that alcohol is an effective analgesic that delivers clinically-relevant reductions in ratings of pain intensity, which could explain alcohol misuse in those with persistent pain despite its potential consequences for...

You Have A Lot To Be Grateful For

There are things that those of us in the developed world are not forced to consider. Those “things” happen to be the often deadly diseases that are still very prevalent throughout developing nations. The same diseases, meanwhile, are virtually gone in many developed nations. Developed nations enjoy early access to vaccines, largely accessible healthcare, and cleaner conditions. Traveling outside of your country can actually be dangerous: different places can really differ down to the microbe. Here are some diseases that, while you may not be likely to see, still plague the developed world. Hopefully this reminds you just how good you have it.   1. Malaria     2. Polio   3. Yellow Fever     4. Measles     5. Tetanus      6. Small Pox Small Pox was included here to show that it is possible to completely eliminate a disease. Small Pox is a disease that no one anywhere, developed nation or developing nation, has to worry about. In 1979, after aggressive action by several countries and the World Health Organization, Small Pox was declared eradicated....

Have Medical Degree – Will Travel

        Featured From Gap Medics Blog   Featured Image:...

Diagnosing Genetic Disorders with Facial Recognition Technology

With advancing technology, you can see a doctor from home using FaceTime or send a pic of your mole for a cancer diagnosis. And now, the same technology that automatically tags your photos on Facebook can help doctors diagnose rare genetic diseases.   Facial recognition technology dates all the way back to 1964, when computer programmers starting teaching their computers how to recognize human faces. Early operations could process about 40 pictures an hour in an attempt to match similar features using coordinates between pupils, outside corners of the eyes, hairline, etc. Early attempts struggled to cope with variations from photo to photo if the subject wasn’t posed in exactly the same position. In the mid-2000s, the Face Recognition Grand Challenge was sponsored by the FBI and Department of Homeland Security, among others, to bring attention and innovation to facial recognition technology.   Image: Source   Now, researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) have produced software that uses facial recognition technology to help diagnose DiGeorge syndrome. A rare genetic disease, DiGeorge syndrome is caused by a defect in chromosome 22. Although its effects vary from person to person, the syndrome can result in cleft palate, low calcium levels, heart defects and a weakened immune system. There is no cure, but early interventions can improve the patient’s outlook through relevant treatments.   The breakthrough is particularly important...

Page 1 of 9123...Last ›