How Augmented Reality is Changing Medical School

Augmented reality (AR) is a technology that combines the real world with computer generated enhancements, such as sound, video, and graphics to literally augment the world around you. I’m sure we’re all aware of the most recent phenomenon that attracted kids and adults alike to wander around streets and parks for elusive Pokemon. PokemonGo is the perfect example of augmented reality in action and used for a mainstream purpose.

 

This same technology that puts a cartoon Pikachu in the real grass in front of you is now being put to use in medical schools. This could completely change the way med students learn about anatomy and physiology. Students would be able to interact with a 3D representation of the human body, making it easier for students to transition to actual patients.

 

hololens-20150710-130017-067

Image: Source

 

Cool, right? Check out the video below to see the technology in action!

 

Video: Source

 

3D4Medical‘s newest product, Complete Anatomy Lab (CAL), has the potential to completely transform the way medical students study anatomy and physiology. The software, with a little help from hardware, can place 3D representations of the human body in any space. The 3D models are composed of over 6,500 interactive body structures, complete with descriptions, related lectures, and other useful study tools the user can summon at any time.

 

The technology may help reduce the number of cadavers needed for training in medical schools, as well as enabling students to learn anatomy and physiology outside of lab hours with the aid of complex and comprehensive replicas of the body. Users can even generate their own lectures and share with the community of CAL subscribers.

 

Featured Image: Source

Featured From: The Doctor’s Channel

398 Total Views 3 Views Today
the-doctors-channel

The Doctor's Channel

Take a bite from the adults' table. The Doctor’s Channel is the world’s leading video site for physicians. Get the latest news in clinical medicine, disease resource centers, CME programs, and Doc Life, all in under 3 mins or less.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *